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Puppy shot in legs in Pell City, donations sought

PELL CITY, Ala. (WIAT) — The Pell City Police Department is asking the public for help in locating those responsible for shooting a puppy Sunday night.

According to PCPD, the puppy, named King, was shot in both rear legs at 8 p.m. in the 100 block of Shady Dale. Authorities say the incident was done for “no apparent reason except to inflict pain and bodily injury.”

PCPD says they have found the owner and that the veterinarian bills will be large and are asking for donations to be made at the Pell City Animal Shelter for King.

Anyone with information on the incident are asked to contact PCPD at 205-884-3334.


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Pres. Trump to hold Monday briefing

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is scheduled to hold a briefing Monday afternoon.

The briefing is scheduled to begin at 5 p.m. Eastern and can be streamed live right here.

Slow, grinding negotiations on a huge COVID-19 relief bill are set to resume Monday afternoon, but the path forward promises to be challenging and time is already growing short. Republicans are griping that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi won’t drop her expansive wish list even as concerns are mounting that the White House needs to be more sure-footed in the negotiations.

Both the Trump administration negotiating team and top Capitol Hill Democrats remain far apart, and talks since Saturday — when the combatants announced modest progress — have yet to lend momentum. Both sides used television appearances over the weekend to showcase their differences.

Ahead of Monday’s talks, all sides predict a long slog ahead despite the lapse of a $600-per-week supplemental COVID-19 jobless benefitthe beginning of school season and the call of lawmakers’ cherished August recess. Several more days of talks are expected, if not more.

The White House is seeking opportunities to boost President Donald Trump, like another round of $1,200 stimulus payments and extending the supplemental jobless benefit and partial eviction ban. Pelosi, the top Democratic negotiator, appears intent on an agreement as well, but she’s made it clear she needs big money for state and local governments, unemployment benefits, and food aid.

Appearances by the principal negotiators on Sunday’s news shows featured continued political shots by White House chief of staff Mark Meadows at Pelosi for turning down a one-week extension of the $600 benefit in talks last week.

Meadows, however, is understaffed during the talks and seems to struggle with his read on Pelosi. He spent much of his time on CBS’ “Face The Nation” attacking her for opposing a piecemeal approach that would revive jobless benefits immediately but leave other items like food stamps and aid to states for later legislation. She is insisting on a complete package.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is so far playing a low-profile role. But he has been a constant in negotiations in four prior COVID-19 response bills, and he is facing time pressure as an antsy Senate yearns to exit Washington. The Democratic-controlled House has left for recess and won’t return until there is an agreement to vote on, but the GOP-held Senate is trapped in the capital.

Areas of agreement already include the $1,200 direct payment and changes to the Paycheck Protection Program to permit especially hard-hit businesses to obtain another loan under generous forgiveness terms.

But the terms and structure of the unemployment benefit remains a huge sticking point, negotiators said Sunday, and Meadows hasn’t made any concessions on the almost $1 trillion Pelosi wants for state and local governments grappling with pandemic-related revenue losses.

“We still have a long ways to go,” Meadows said, adding, “I’m not optimistic that there will be a solution in the very near term.”

Pelosi said she’d consider reducing the $600 benefit for states with lower unemployment rates. Republicans want to cut the benefit to encourage beneficiaries to return to work and say it is bad policy since it pays many jobless people more money than they made at their previous jobs.

“Right now, today, we have an emergency,” Pelosi said Monday on CNN. “A building is on fire and they are deciding how much water they want to have in the bucket. This is very important to stop — millions of people could have fallen into poverty without this $600.”

Another sticking point is that Republicans want to give more school aid to systems that are restarting with in-school learning, even as Dr. Deborah Birx, Trump’s top coronavirus adviser, cautioned that schools in areas with spikes in cases should delay reopening

“In the areas where we have this widespread case increase, we need to stop the cases, and then we can talk about safely reopening,” Birx said on “This Week.”

The House passed a $3.5 trillion measure in May, but Republicans controlling the Senate have demanded a slower approach, saying it was necessary to take a “pause” before passing additional legislation. Since they announced that strategy, however, coronavirus caseloads have spiked and the economy has absorbed an enormous blow.


260 Georgia school district employees call in sick due to COVID-19

SUWANEE, Ga. (NEXSTAR) – One week before the school year is set to begin for one of Georgia’s largest public school districts, officials say more than 250 employees have tested positive or been exposed to COVID-19.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that Gwinnett County Public Schools teachers began in-person planning last week in suburban Atlanta. Officials confirmed within 24 hours about 260 employees had called in to report a positive coronavirus test or possible exposure. Because of that, they’re now unable to work.

“Given the number of COVID cases in Gwinnett (County), we would expect to see positives among our employees based on the community spread in our county,” a district spokesperson told CNN.

The district plans to teach online courses only when the 180,000 student district opens for classes on Aug. 12.

Despite the high case count across the state, CNN reports some parents held a protest last week demanding that children be allowed to return to in-person learning.

The Associated Press contributed to this report


Commissioner of ADAI discuss test results of unsolicited seed packages delivered to Alabama residents from China

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WIAT) — Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries Rick Pate will hold a press conference Monday to discuss test results of unsolicited seed packages delivered to Alabama residents from China.

Last week, the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) received hundreds of reports from citizens who received packages of seeds from China they did not order.

ADAI established an online reporting system to track deliveries of the unsolicited seeds. ADAI field inspectors collected packages of seeds to be analyzed for identification and tested for unknown compounds, noxious weed seed, and invasive species.

Commissioner Pate will share the results collected so far.


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DA seeking President Trump’s taxes cites reports of ‘protracted criminal conduct’ at Trump Organization

NEW YORK (AP) — A Manhattan prosecutor trying to get President Donald Trump’s tax returns told a judge Monday that he was justified in demanding them, citing public reports of “extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization.”

Trump’s lawyers last month said the grand jury subpoena for the tax returns was issued in bad faith and amounted to harassment of the president.

Manhattan District Attorney District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. seeks eight years of the Republican president’s personal and corporate tax records, but has disclosed little about what prompted him to request the records, other than part of the investigation relates to payoffs to women to keep them quiet about alleged affairs with Trump.

In a court filing Monday, though, attorneys for Vance said Trump’s arguments that the subpoena was too broad stemmed from “the false premise” that the probe was limited to so-called “hush-money” payments.

“This Court is already aware that this assertion is fatally undermined by undisputed information in the public record,” Vance’s lawyers wrote. They said that information confirms the validity of a subpoena seeking evidence related to potentially improper financial transactions by a variety of individuals and entities over a period of years.

They said public reporting demonstrates that at the time the subpoena was issued “there were public allegations of possible criminal activity at Plaintiff’s New York County-based Trump Organization dating back over a decade.”

“These reports describe transactions involving individual and corporate actors based in New York County, but whose conduct at times extended beyond New York’s borders. This possible criminal activity occurred within the applicable statutes of limitations, particularly if the transactions involved a continuing pattern of conduct,” the lawyers said.

The lawyers urged Judge Victor Marrero to swiftly reject Trump’s arguments, saying the baseless claims were threatening the investigation. Marrero, who ruled against Trump last year, has scheduled arguments to be fully submitted by mid-August.

“Every day that goes by is another day Plaintiff effectively achieves the ‘temporary absolute immunity’ that was rejected by this Court, the Court of Appeals, and the Supreme Court,” Vance’s lawyers said. “Every such day also increases the prospect of a loss of evidence or the expiration of limitations periods — the precise concerns that the Supreme Court observed justified its rejection of Plaintiff’s immunity claim in the first place.”

The Supreme Court last month rejected claims by Trump’s lawyers that the president could not be criminally investigated while he was in office.

Vance’s lawyers said Trump was not entitled to know the scope and nature of the grand jury investigation. But they said information already in the public domain about Trump’s business dealings provided satisfactory support for the subpoena of his tax records.

They cited several newspaper articles, including one in the Washington Post examining allegations that Trump had a practice of sending out financial statements to potential business partners and banks that inflated the worth of his properties by claiming they were bigger or more potentially lucrative than they were.

Trump’s former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, described such practices during congressional testimony.

Vance sought the tax records in part for a probe of how Cohen arranged during the 2016 presidential race to keep the porn actress Stormy Daniels and model Karen McDougal from airing claims of extramarital affairs with Trump. Trump has denied the affairs.

Cohen is serving the last two years of a three-year prison sentence in home confinement after pleading guilty to campaign finance violations and lying to Congress, among other charges. He said he plans to publish a book critical of the president before the November election.


FAA mulls ordering 4 safety fixes to Boeing 737 MAX as fleet remains grounded

Safety flaws put in spotlight after two deadly crashes forced international grounding in 2019.


1st big Southern California wildfire of 2020 keeps on raging

A huge wildfire in mountains east of Los Angeles that is Southern California's biggest blaze so far this year was still raging Monday, with thousands of people forced to evacuate … Click to Continue »


B.C police oversight agency investigates after man bitten by Kelowna police dog

The suspect was taken to Kelowna General Hospital with serious injuries related to being bitten by the police dog. 


Injury Crash SH7 near Ahsahka

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

DO NOT REPLY

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 2 Patrol 2700 North and South Highway Lewiston, ID 83501-1732

(208) 799-5151

Fax (208) 799-5146

For Immediate Release: 08/03/2020 12:34 pm

Please direct questions to the District Office

On August 2nd 2020, approximately 1600 hours, ISP responded to a two vehicle serious injury crash that involved a pickup pulling a boat and a motorcycle with one rider at the intersection of SH7 and A Road in Ahsahka, Idaho. The rider was transported to Clearwater Hospital in Orofino, Idaho, and then airlifted to St. Josephs Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho with serious and possibly life threatening injuries. The occupants of the pickup were not injured. The crash is still under investigation.

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Decatur Police ask for help identifying body found at Wheeler Wildlife Refuge

DECATUR, Ala. – Decatur police are asking for help identifying a body that was found in the water at Wheeler Wildlife Refuge last week.

Decatur Police officers went to the refuge, after a fisherman located what they believed to be human remains in the water on July 31.  

Detectives have so far been unable to identify the remains. Authorities say the person is most likely a female, aged 25-50 years old, 5’9″ inches tall and between 100 to 140 lbs. Their ethnicity is undetermined at this time.

If anyone has any information about a missing individual who would fit this description, please contact Detective Sean Mukaddam at 256-341-4617 or email him at smukaddam@decatur-al.gov.


Aurora police apologize after Black children were detained, handcuffed in stolen car mixup

AURORA — Aurora police apologized after a group of Black girls were detained and at least two handcuffed during a weekend investigation of a stolen car. Officers later determined that the vehicle they were seeking had the same license plate number but was from out of state.

A video taken Sunday by a bystander shows the children, ranging in age from 6 to 17 years old, in a parking lot in Aurora, where there have recently been protests over the death of a 23-year-old Black man, Elijah McClain, who was stopped by police last year, KUSA-TV reported.

The video shows the 17-year-old and 12-year-old lying on their stomachs with their hands cuffed behind their backs and a 14-year-old girl lying next to the 6-year-old, also on their stomachs, in a parking lot next to the car. They can be heard crying and screaming as officers stand with their back to the camera. A woman on the other side of the car is shown being led away in handcuffs.

An officer eventually helps the handcuffed 17-year-old and 12-year-old sit up but leaves them sitting with their hands behind their backs.

Police then determined they had stopped the wrong car. It had Colorado license plates but a motorcycle with the same license plate number from Montana was the vehicle that had been reported as stolen on Sunday.

Driver Brittney Gilliam, who had taken her nieces, sister and daughter out for a girls’ day at the nail salon, called the officers’ actions a case of police brutality.

“There’s no excuse why you didn’t handle it a different type of way,” Gilliam said. “You could have even told them ‘step off to the side let me ask your mom or your auntie a few questions so we can get this cleared up.’ There was different ways to handle it.”

Jennifer Wurtz, who shot the video, said on camera that the police drew guns as they initially approached the car. After she told the officers that the children were scared and asked to be able to speak to them, she was told to back up 25 feet because she was interfering in their investigation.

Police spokesperson Agent Faith Goodrich said officers are trained to do a “high-risk stop” when stopping a stolen car, which involves drawing weapons, telling occupants to exit the car and lie prone on the ground.

“There is not a written policy regarding when/how we use this stop. Officers can use discretion based on the information they have at the time,” she said.

“The Aurora Police Department understands that this is concerning and traumatic for those involved and we again offer our apologies,” the department said in a statement.

The department is under scrutiny for the death of McClain, a Black man stopped by officers as he walked home from the store last August after someone reported he was suspicious. Police put him in a carotid hold and paramedics injected him with ketamine, a sedative. He had a heart attack and was later declared brain dead and taken off life support at a hospital.


Hakim Sillah death: Man guilty of knife awareness course murder

Vladimir Nachev is found guilty of murder after fatally stabbing Hakim Sillah twice in the chest.


El Dorado County restaurants defy closure orders after employees didn’t wear masks

El Dorado County officials have suspended the health permits of two restaurants for failing to require employees to wear masks to protect against COVID-19. Both restaurants, however, have remained open … Click to Continue »


2 California prisoners die of suspected virus complications

Two more inmates at San Quentin State Prison near San Francisco died from what appear to be complications of the coronavirus, corrections officials said Monday. The inmates, including one on … Click to Continue »


Three Denver officers found justified in killing man who stole police car and pointed AR-15 at them

Three Denver Police Department officers were justified in shooting and killing a man in October 2019 who stole a department vehicle and pointed a stolen AR-15 rifle at police as they chased him.

Adam Martinez, 36, stole a Denver patrol officer’s car after she responded to a report of a carjacking at a car wash. The officer had left her AR-15 in the front seat and her keys in the ignition as she and a second officer tried to apprehend Martinez. But Martinez got to her car and drove away, according to a letter from Denver District Attorney Beth McCann that cleared the officers of criminal wrongdoing.

Martinez then led police on a car chase along 6th Avenue, Federal Boulevard and 8th Avenue as he waved the rifle out the car window. Officers forced his car to crash on West 8th Avenue under an Interstate 25 overpass. After the stolen police car stopped, Martinez pointed the AR-15 at the officers who had chased him, including an officer who was trapped in his car next to the one Martinez had stolen, the letter said.

Denver officers Ismael Lopez, Vincent Vasquez and John Allred opened fire, hitting Martinez with 15 bullets.

McCann will discuss her decision on the shooting at 5:30 p.m., Aug. 10 in an online forum. The public may participate here: https://bit.ly/33hkigV.


Championship play-off final: Brentford and Fulham set for richest game

Brentford and Fulham meet in the Championship play-off final at Wembley on Tuesday evening, a match often dubbed the richest in football.


England hopeful Robinson shines in Trophy – day three round-up

England hopeful Ollie Robinson takes 5-29 as Sussex beat Hampshire by 94 runs to become the first match winners in the Bob Willis Trophy.


Eight North Alabama nursing homes to receive rapid COVID-19 testing machines

HUNTSVILLE, Ala – The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has expanded its list of nursing homes to be allocated rapid COVID-19 testing machines. The updated list now includes eight nursing homes in North Alabama.

Those nursing homes are located in Madison, Limestone, Colbert, Lauderdale, Marshall and Morgan Counties.

WHNT News 19 reached out to many of the North Alabama nursing homes on the list. At this time it is not clear when they will receive the machine.

Last month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced that every skilled nursing facility across the country would receive a point-of-care device. At that time it said that the machines were going to be sent to hot spots across the nation to improve providers’ ability to stop the spread of COVID-19. At that time 44 nursing homes in Alabama located in Jefferson, Lee, and Montgomery counties were allocated the device.

An additional 34 Alabama facilities were allocated rapid COVID-19 testing machines last week, bringing the total number of facilities in the state to receive a device to 78.

CMS originally prioritized allocation of machines to 636 skilled nursing facilities across the country. The list now includes more than 2,000 facilities nation-wide.

According to the Centers for Medicaid, facilities are prioritized to receive the point-of-care device based on certain criteria including:

  • Three or more confirmed or suspected new cases of COVID-19 in the last week
  • At least one new COVID-19 case in the last week after having zero previous COVID-19 cases
  • Inadequate access to testing in the last week
  • At least one new resident death due to COVID-19 in the last week
  • At least one new confirmed or suspected COVID-19 case among staff in the last week

“Pandemic pods” aim to provide stability to Colorado families worried about COVID-hampered schooling

The unprecedented uncertainty whipped up by COVID-19 just weeks before the start of the school year is prompting an increasing number of parents to pursue what amounts to an academic side hustle — small-group “learning pods” that families hope will bring some stability amidst the chaos of a global pandemic.

“I think it comes down to uncertainty — and I think the only certain thing is that last spring did not go well,” said Julie Simmons, a Boulder mom who administers the Boulder Valley School District Learning Pods Facebook page. “A lot of parents are really anxious about how to make the school year work.”

That anxiety has only mounted as various school districts in the state devise different approaches to reopening later this month, ranging from 100% in-person instruction to full remote learning to a mix of the two. In the three weeks since Simmons helped create the pod Facebook page, she already has gotten interest from more than 2,000 parents looking to set up or join a learning group — sometimes referred to as a “pandemic pod.”

“People are trying to find whatever solutions they can,” said Simmons, whose 6-year-old did not do well with online classes in the spring.

The pod phenomenon is new, arising from the chaos that many parents experienced in the spring trying to do their jobs while overseeing their children’s education after schools closed en masse in March as the coronavirus began its spread. The concept can take different forms, from the establishment of formal “mini-schools” that operate out of a rented space to simply two or more families using their homes to share schooling, tutoring or child care costs.

Families may go as far as hiring a certified teacher to provide instruction or they may tap a college or high school student to help guide their children through their schools’ online curriculum and keep them on track. Advocates say one of the big advantages of pods, especially in districts that are delaying the start of in-person learning — like Denver, Jefferson County and Aurora — is as a venue to let children socialize with their peers instead of spending hours in front of a computer screen all by themselves.

“The aim is to keep contact circles small and safe in this pandemic while providing much needed support to families and children,” states the nocopods.org website, which was created barely a week ago and serves Weld and Larimer counties. “It takes a village, right?”

Because the phenomenon is so new and untested, it’s not clear when pod learning might intrude on homeschooling, which must follow certain state education protocols. Parents who spoke to The Denver Post for this story indicated they would still be following their district’s standard remote learning curriculum, with just a little additional guidance at their end.

Terra Wallin, an associate director with Washington, D.C.-based The Education Trust, said much of the parental confusion stems from a lack of central guidance at either the federal or state level as the 2020-2021 school year looms.

“Parents are trying to pick up next steps where they see a lack of leadership,” she said. “It’s people looking at any solution to get their children what they need.”

But Wallin cautioned that learning pods could have the unintended effect of worsening disparities in academic achievement between affluent communities that can afford to hire teachers and tutors to instruct their children and lower-income neighborhoods, where families may not have the means to form such groups.

“This (COVID-19) crisis has put a spotlight on those disparities,” Wallin said, noting that people of color have been disproportionately impacted by the disease. “Pods seem to be a symptom of the greater system of inequities we already have.”

Simmons, the Boulder mother, said she is mindful of equity issues in education and gives her full backing to the public school system. She sees pods as a stopgap solution until students can safely return to classrooms once again.

“My intent is for this to be a temporary, emergency schooling measure and not to be long term,” she said.

Pods and inequity

Kevin Welner, director of the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado Boulder, also suspects that the pod movement may be a “blip” while schools remain closed.

“This is something where parents are scrambling to make the best choices in a very difficult situation,” Welner said. “But the vast majority want to send their kids back to their neighborhood public schools.”

But that only happens if Colorado gets the pandemic under control. Through much of July, the state’s coronavirus caseload made a steady march upward and many of the state’s larger school districts pushed back in-person learning by weeks. Then there’s the possibility of a second wave of COVID-19 in the fall or winter, which could drive districts that have re-opened buildings to shut them down again.

While school districts may be better equipped this fall to offer quality remote learning than they were in the spring when they had to suddenly pivot to online instruction with little warning, Welner said families that are able to participate in pods will have an advantage over families that don’t.

“The more that teachers are speaking to specific students — responding to their specific questions and building relationships with students — that will be a much healthier and more robust experience,” he said. “It’s that relationship part, making it like you’re a part of a community of learners, that was missing last spring.”

The New York Times reported in June on new research that shed light on the shortcomings of online instruction. The research suggests that by September most students will have fallen behind where they would have been if they had gone to class, with some losing the equivalent of a full school year’s worth of academic gains, the newspaper reported.

Gaps along racial and socioeconomic lines will likely worsen because of disparities in access to web-connected technology and direct teacher instruction, the research showed.

“The equity issues are extraordinary in schools right now — the equity issues should be smacking us in the face,” Welner said.

Steve Smith, a special education teacher at Denver’s Lake Middle School on the east edge of Sloan’s Lake, said there may be a middle road on the question of learning pods: bring them in-house.

“I think you let certain teachers volunteer to teach at schools — we could teach cohorts of 10 kids each,” Smith said. “I think there’s a way of opening the buildings up to those who need the service the most.”

hose might be children with special needs who require more face-to-face instruction or students from households lacking the infrastructure to do remote learning properly, he said. Last week, Denver Public Schools announced it would delay in-person learning to at least mid-October but it is considering a plan — the details of which still need to be hammered out — to bring back small groups of students in early childhood education, with special needs, or those studying English as a second language as soon as Sept. 8.

“To ensure we don’t compound inequities, the public sector has to step up and provide similar services as the private sector,” Smith said.

“Consistency and predictability”

In the last few weeks, numerous private companies have sprung up or adjusted their business plans to offer services finding teachers or tutors for parents seeking to put together pods. Selected, a company formed in 2016 to match prospective teachers with school districts, has in recent weeks gotten inquiries from parents looking for educators to lead a pod.

“The traffic to our site has gone up,” said Selected CEO Waine Tam. “COVID has forced the issue.”

He said the parents he’s been talking to “don’t have faith in remote learning” and are dubious about how solidly health officials can get a handle on the coronavirus pandemic in short order. That makes the stability and constancy of a pod that much more attractive.

“Even if schools open up, they could shut down again and you’re back to remote learning overnight,” Tam said.

In the meantime, the pod movement continues to expand in Colorado. In Larimer County, Katie Abrams is searching for a couple of families in her daughter’s school in the Poudre School District to go in on a pandemic pod together, hiring a certified teacher to work in their homes with their children for 30 to 35 hours a week using the district’s curriculum.

Abrams, a journalism professor at Colorado State University, helps administer the Pandemic Pods — Northern Colorado Facebook group, which already has assembled 850 members since it was formed in mid-July.

“With a 5-year-old, a lot of changes to their routine can really wreak havoc,” she said, referencing her daughter. “Everyone is preparing for fluctuation in the academic schedule — the pod provides more consistency and predictability. We’re already in a time of extreme uncertainty and when it comes to your kids, you come to a point where you can’t take it anymore.”

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


Man facing charges after late-night car, foot chase in Saskatoon: police

A man is facing several charges after police say he fled in a stolen car and on foot Sunday night.


State university officials, ADPH announce GuideSafe COVID-19 assessment and exposure tracking app

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Monday, representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, The University of Alabama System, and Alabama Department of Public Health, announced the launch of GuideSafe, a multitool platform encompassing the formerly announced Stay Safe Together and Testing for Alabama initiatives.

Being developed in connection with two of America’s largest tech companies: Apple and Google, it is aimed at reducing the number of ADPH personnel needed to provide notice of a positive test and reduce spread of the virus. The GuideSafe app’s development was lead by a team of experts at UAB who aim to promote a safe entry to higher education campuses and ongoing COVID-19 monitoring for students and the community at large.

Governor Kay Ivey designated $30 million of federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act money for the software.

About the GuideSafe App

According to developers, the GuideSade app is comprised of 3 components:

  • Healthcheck
  • Exposure Notification App
  • Event Passport

The Healthcheck function is required to be used by all college students, staff and faculty. This component consists of a set of questions that assess symptoms and exposure to COVID-19. An initial set up survey is performed the first time you access Healthcheck and will take about 20 seconds to complete. Administrators are asking that those on campus complete an assessment each day, and at the very least once every three days.

The Exposure Notification App is not required to be used by students, faculty and staff. However, administrators say it is highly recommended. This component of the GuideSafe technology anonymously shares a positive COVID-19 test result, and can be anonymously notified of potential previous close contact with someone who later reports a positive COVID-19 test result. Developers say it performs said tasks without compromising anyone’s identity.

The closed pilot phase of the GuideSafe’s anonymous Exposure Notification System (ENS) app officially launched Monday. College students across Alabama will be invited to participate, and any individual in the state of Alabama with an email address that ends with “.edu” is encouraged to sign up to participate in the pilot phase.

The final component of the GuideSafe app, Event Passport, facilitates access to facilities, meetings and events with 10 or more participants. After completing HealthCheck, an algorithm renders an event passport for presentation at events. Green means an individual is good to attend, while red means you should not attend.

College Students Must be Tested for COVID-19

University administrators also emphasized that a negative COVID-19 test result will be required for Alabama college students before they are allowed on their respective campuses. University officials said they have determined 13 testing locations for students across the state. The testing sites will open August 4.

The locations were selected based on where students live, not the proximity to campus. There are two Huntsville locations on the list. You can find a full list of locations on the GuideSafe website.

University officials are asking that students check their email accounts to schedule a location and time to be tested ahead of returning to campus.

The tests for college students will be a self-administered swab in the nostril. This method differs from the standard, more invasive, nasopharyngeal swab. The new method has been sensitivity tested, and according to UAB is proven to be just as effective.

Commercial labs are dependent on pre-made kits, UAB Dr. Michael Saag said those kits are in short supply right now, which leads to longer turnaround. Saag said thanks to a testing method developed by UAB’s Department of Pathology, that does not rely on those kits, officials anticipate they will test between 10,000 and 12,000 students each day. At that rate, more than 200,000 students will be tested over the next month. Tests will be sent to UAB’s pathology lab and are expected to turnaround in 24-48 hours.

UAB officials said in the initial planning of the software, statewide testing wasn’t their main focus as numbers didn’t reflect the same need they do now. They are hopeful they will be able to provide the same tests to Alabama citizens in the coming weeks.

State Health Officer, Dr. Scott Harris, said what UAB has developed shows a lot of promise and he anticipates this method being the future of state testing.


Watch live: Gov. Gavin Newsom gives COVID-19 update as California battles wildfires

California Gov. Gavin Newsom will give a COVID-19 update Monday afternoon, according to his office. Once the press conference begins, you can watch the livestream at the link below: Newsom … Click to Continue »


Homeless encampment around Morey Middle School starts to empty

The homeless camp around Morey Middle School started to empty Monday as advocates and city workers urged residents to move out before the city takes more aggressive action to clear the area.

Advocates provided carts, boxes, tape and other supplies to residents of the camp, hoping to avoid a scene like the one last week at a large homeless encampment in Lincoln Park in front of the state capitol building, where law enforcement officers in riot gear moved in early in the morning and ordered residents to pack up.

“It was horrible,” Cuica Montoya, with Colorado Village Collaborative, said about the Thursday sweep. The sweep was traumatic for residents and deepened the distrust with which people experiencing homelessness view authorities, she said.

“Being left alone for so long, and then not even being given 24 hours to move, that’s rough,” she said.

Although last week’s sweep did not target the camp around Morey Middle School — which is just a few blocks away in the 800 block of East 14th Avenue — city officials have said a sweep at the school is being planned, and residents there know the site is high on the city’s list of priorities. Montoya said she expects to see a sweep in the next few days.

On Monday, a city trash truck circled the block, collecting discarded or abandoned items and piles of trash collected by residents.

Patrick Wilcox, who has been homeless for about three months, loaded a cart with boxes of his belongings as he prepared to leave. He was pushed into the streets after he lost his job as a dishwasher when the restaurant he worked at shut down because of the novel coronavirus, he said.

“I’m not going far,” he said as he packed. “Just three or four blocks.”

Many of those moving away from the middle school will simply find new, more scattered places to camp in the city, rather than going into shelters, in part because residents are afraid of COVID-19 spreading in indoor shelters.

The city has not yet opened its planned outdoor designated camping sites, which Mayor Michael Hancock said in early July would be an emergency measure to provide safe outdoor space to people experiencing homelessness.

The sites, which will be managed by Colorado Village Collaborative, might be open by the end of the month, Montoya said, although she added they’d previously hoped to have the sites up and running by mid-July and the process keeps getting delayed.

Wilcox said he would welcome a city-sanctioned outdoor campsite. He imagines a place where residents share chores on a rotation, and perhaps do a few hours of litter cleanup work around the city each week in exchange for a place to stay.

“Something like that would really help,” he said.


08-03-20 Papaikou traffic fatality

Hawai‘i Police Department
Traffic Enforcement Unit, Area I
Sergeant Jeremy Riddle
Phone: 961-2391
Report No. 20-058069

 

Media Release

A Laupāhoehoe woman has died following a single vehicle collision on Saturday morning (August 1) on Highway 19 in the area of the 8 mile marker.

The 63-year-old female has been positively identified as Jane Lawrence.

Responding to a 4:50 a.m. call, police determined that a 2006 Honda Civic traveling southwest on Highway 19 veered across the center line and struck the Kaʻieʻie storm bridge guardrail head-on.

The 63-year-old female driver was transported to Hilo Medical Center and initially listed in stable condition. At 5:05 pm she was pronounced dead at the Hilo Medical Center and may have suffered from a medical emergency.

An autopsy has been ordered to determine the exact cause of death.

The Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a Coroner’s Inquest investigation and is asking for anyone who may have witnessed the accident or have information leading to the identity of the responsible to contact Officer Erhard Autrata at 961-2329. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo.


Navy investigates video of dogs attacking Kaepernick fill-in

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Navy is investigating an incident in which dogs attacked a “Colin Kaepernick stand-in” during a K-9 demonstration during a 2019 fundraiser at the Navy Seals Museum in Florida.

The Navy said in a statement posted on Twitter that officials became aware of the video on Sunday.

Kaepernick is a former San Francisco 49ers quarterback who began kneeling during the playing of “The Star Spangled Banner” before games to protest social injustice and police brutality. He played his final NFL game in January 2017. He offered support to those protesting the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers in May, and the NFL’s commissioner has apologized for not listening earlier to players’ concerns about social injustice.

The videos show four dogs attacking a man, who is wearing a red Kaepernick football jersey over heavily padded gear as people stand nearby watching. In a second video, the man is laying on the ground when he’s approached by men wearing fatigues and holding rifles, saying, “On your belly.” The man replies, “Oh, man, I will stand,” as he rolls over, followed by laughing from the crowd.

The videos were apparently posted on Instagram last year and resurfaced over the weekend.

“The inherent message of this video is completely inconsistent with the values and ethos of Naval Special Warfare and the U.S. Navy,” the statement said.

The Navy said the “initial indications” are that no active duty personnel or equipment were used in the demonstration at the “independent organization’s event.”

The Navy Seals Museum is located in Fort Pierce, Florida, which is north of West Palm Beach on the state’s Atlantic Coast.


Oldest living Marine celebrates 105th birthday with drive-by salute

(WHTM) — Retired Maj. Bill White, the oldest living Marine, has seen a few things throughout his years — all 105 of them.

Family and friends celebrated his 105th birthday Friday with a drive-by birthday salute.

The centenarian said celebrating another year “feels just as good as it did at 104.”

White spent 30 years in the Marine Corps and was awarded a Purple Heart for the injury that took him out of the Battle of Iwo Jima.

“It’s very heartwarming,” said his daughter, Mary Huston. “It does get to you that there are so many people that love him and appreciate him for his service.”

In February, White went viral on social media when he wished for people to send him Valentine’s Day cards. He received over 300,000 of them.

While celebrating his 105th birthday this year, he said he had one goal in mind: “Right now, I’m trying for 106.”


Alabama man finds alligator swimming in his backyard pool

MOBILE, Ala. — An Alabama man woke up recently and found an alligator in his swimming pool.

“What in the blue blazes is this?” homeowner Steven Mculland said in a video Friday. “I took my glasses off and looked around and made sure I was seeing what I thought I was seeing, and I was.”

Mculland suspects the small alligator climbed over his fence to reach the backyard pool, where it was seen swimming laps, reported WALA.

“I’ve been looking around seeing how he got in there, and there’s nothing, so he must’ve climbed in,” he said.

Alligators, which can swim quickly using their tails, use water to catch their prey, but this one may have been trying to cool off.

“I am flabbergasted,” Mculland said in the video. “[If] you own an alligator, and you’re missing one, he’s in the backyard in my pool. Come get it. Thank you.”

Mculland says the next time he takes a dip, he’ll make sure to look twice.


Trump fires Tennessee Valley Authority chair, cites high pay

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that he had fired the chair of the Tennessee Valley Authority, saying the executive was getting paid too much and was hiring foreign workers.

Trump told reporters at the White House that he was formally removing the authority’s chair of the board and another member of the board, and he threatened to remove other board members if they keep hiring foreign labor.

The TVA is a federally owned corporation created in 1933 to provide flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing and economic development to the Tennessee Valley, a region that was hard hit by the Great Depression. The region covers most of Tennessee and parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Kentucky as well as small sections of Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia.

He said the TVA board must immediately hire a new chief executive officer who “puts the interests of Americans first.” According to Trump, the CEO earns $8 million a year.

“The new CEO must be paid no more than $500,000 a year,” Trump said. “We want the TVA to take action on this immediately. … Let this serve as a warning to any federally appointed board: If you betray American workers, you will hear two words: ‘You’re fired.’”

U.S. Tech Workers, a nonprofit that wants to limit visas given to foreign technology workers, took out an ad to persuade Trump to stop the TVA from outsourcing much of its information technology division. The group, led by Kevin Lynn, criticized the TVA for furloughing its own workers and replacing them with contractors using foreign workers with H-1B visas.

Trump made the announcement as he signed an executive order to require all federal agencies to complete an internal audit to prove they are not replacing qualified American workers with people from other countries. The White House said the order will help prevent federal agencies from unfairly replacing American workers with lower cost foreign labor.

The order followed the TVA’s announcement that it would outsource 20% of its technology jobs to companies based in foreign countries. TVA’s action could cause more than 200 highly skilled American tech workers in Tennessee to lose their jobs to foreign workers hired on temporary work visas, according to the White House.

But Republican Sen. Labor Alexander of Tennessee said the TVA doesn’t get any taxpayer money. Commenting on the issue in April, Alexander said the White House was spreading misinformation. He said that TVA chief executive officers’ pay is lower than other large utilities and that TVA energy rates are among the lowest in the nation.


08-03-20 Promotions announced

Hawaiʻi Police Department
Office of the Chief
Chief Paul Ferreira
Phone: (808) 961-2244

 

Media Release

Police Chief Paul Ferreira has promoted fourteen individuals to the rank of Sergeant/Detective. 

Detective Ray Fukada, a 19-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Criminal Investigation Section (Kona).  He most recently served as a patrol officer in North Kohala.  

Detective Darrell Clinton, a 17-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Juvenile Aid Section (Kona).  He most recently served as a patrol officer in Kona. 

Detective Scotty Aloy, a 16-year veteran is now assigned to the Area I Criminal Investigation Section (Hilo).  He most recently served as a patrol officer in South Hilo. 

Detective Jeremy Kubojiri, a 15-year veteran is now assigned to the Area I Criminal Investigation Section (Hilo).  He most recently served as a Community Policing Officer in Puna

Detective Michael Santos, a 14-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Criminal Investigation Section (Kona).  He most recently served as a patrol officer in South Hilo.

Detective James Steffen, a 14-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Criminal Investigation Section (Kona).  He most recently served as a canine handler officer in the Area I Juvenile Aid Section.

Detective Zenas Pacheco, a 13-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Vice Section (Kona).  He most recently served as a canine handler officer in the Area I Vice Section.

Detective Kimmerlyn Makuakane-Jarrell, a 12-year veteran is now assigned to the Area II Criminal Investigation Section (Kona).  She most recently served as a canine handler officer in the Area II Vice Section.  

Sergeant Marco Segobia, a 12-year veteran is now assigned to patrol in the North Kohala District.  He most recently served as an officer in the Area II Vice Section.

Sergeant Ryan Pagan, a 12-year veteran is now assigned to patrol in the Puna District.  He most recently served as a Police Recruit Instructor in the Training Section.

Sergeant Kimo Keliipaakaua, a 12-year veteran is now assigned to patrol in the Kona District.  He most recently served as a Traffic Enforcement Unit officer in Area II.   

Detective John Balberde, a 11-year veteran is now assigned to the Area I Criminal Investigation Section (Hilo).  He most recently served as a Criminal Intelligence Unit officer in Area I. 

Sergeant Bradden Kimura, a 11-year veteran is now assigned to patrol in the South Kohala District.  He most recently served as a patrol officer in Kona.

Sergeant Thomas Chun-Ming, a 7-year veteran is now assigned to patrol in the South Kohala District.  He most recently served as a patrol officer in Hilo. 

These promotions were effective on August 1, 2020.


COVID-19 cases flattening in Madison County, officials say, but people need to keep them down

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – The number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in Madison County is flattening, officials said Monday, but they warned people to make sure they continue to help push the numbers down.

Crestwood Hospital CEO Dr. Pam Hudson said the flattening of numbers is allowing people in hospitals to get the best care they can get, but she warned that the system also is feeling stress, and people need to continue masking, socially distancing and sanitizing.

“At the end of this month there’s another holiday,” Hudson said. “Please begin to plan with COVID in mind. Make your plans fit the precautions we must take, instead of the other way around.”

There were 121 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in Madison County Monday, officials said. About 40 were in intensive care.

While those numbers were to be expected, Hudson said, in Madison County in the last couple of weeks about 60 to 65 percent of those in ICU need a ventilator. Typically 30 to 40 percent of ICU patients need them, she said. The reason for the higher number wasn’t known.

When it comes to testing and the recent increased turnaround the state has faced in getting results back, Hudson said people should have plans for after they’ve tested. Those people need to go home and self-isolate, and prepare for what could happen if the results are positive.

“Your job as a citizen is to go home and wait for your test results to come back,” Hudson said.


‘Vile’ rapist jailed for ‘despicable’ attack in Grimsby

Henry Froggatt, 25, from Cleethorpes, has been "classed as a dangerous offender", police say.


Jackrabbit found with arrow in neck in Regina’s Glencairn neighbourhood

A jackrabbit was found running around in Regina's Glencairn neighbourhood with a large arrow in its neck on Saturday night.


Canadian professor hits back at critics of ‘diversity’ essay in top science journal

In a lengthy statement, Tomas Hudlicky, 69, of Brock University, says he stands by his views, which he argues were misinterpreted.


Huntsville woman’s remains found in Tennessee, police searching for person of interest

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Huntsville Police said they are searching for a person of interest after a Huntsville woman was found dead in Tennessee.

Investigators stated they are searching for Charles “Shorty” Preston, 29, for questioning in the disappearance of Sharon Michelle Copeland, 49.

Originally reported as a missing person, Copeland was last seen June 30. In the initial report, HPD reported her last name as “Hardee.”

Investigators were led to a location in Tennessee where human remains were discovered. Initially thought to be Copeland, further investigation confirmed authorities had found Copeland’s remains.

Investigators said they are confident she died in Huntsville, but need additional information to determine the exact cause of death.

Anyone with information on where Preston may be should call Huntsville Police investigators at (256) 924-1778 or the main non-emergency number at (256) 722-7100.


Tanker-truck carrying 5,000 litres of diesel fuel catches fire

A tanker-truck carrying 5,000 litres of diesel fuel caught fire early Monday morning on Highway 223 in Saint-Basile-Le-Grand.


Canadian charities worry about loss of trust, donation amid WE scandal

The head of a group promoting charities says the sector is worried about long-term negative impacts of the ongoing WE controversy on Parliament Hill.


California lawmakers were globetrotters before pandemic

It was a different era for California lawmakers before the coronavirus pandemic: business-class flights to Japan, stays at 5-star hotels and dinners with local politicians in the name of promoting … Click to Continue »


Students stuck paying thousands in rent for vacant rooms amid pandemic

"I had to rely on CERB to continue paying for my rent because job opportunities were scarce and I was here worrying about an empty apartment hours away from me."


Navy investigates video of dogs attacking Kaepernick fill-in

The U.S. Navy is investigating an incident in which dogs attacked a “Colin Kaepernick stand-in” during a K-9 demonstration during a 2019 fundraiser at the Navy Seals Museum in Florida. … Click to Continue »


Lindsay Birbeck: Teen ‘killed woman and moved body in wheelie bin’

The body of Lindsay Birbeck was discovered by a dog walker in Accrington Cemetery.


Motorcycle crash leaves Hamilton man, 21, dead: police

Police are asking any witnesses, or those with dashcam video, who were in the area at the time of the crash to contact them.


Virgin Orbit determines cause of rocket launch failure

Virgin Orbit said Monday it has determined what caused the failure of its debut rocket launch and is working toward a second flight that will carry small satellites for NASA. … Click to Continue »


National security law: France halts ratification of extradition treaty with Hong Kong

France on Monday said it was halting ratification of an extradition treaty with Hong Kong after Beijing introduced a controversial new security law in the former British colony.“In light of the latest developments, France will not proceed as it stands with the ratification of the extradition agreement signed on May 4, 2017 between France and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region,” the French foreign ministry said in a statement.The ministry bitterly criticised the new security law, saying…


Championship play-offs quiz: Test your knowledge of previous finals

As Brentford meet Fulham in the Championship play-off final, test your knowledge of previous finals from the second tier.


Onion recall expands across Canada; 17 hospitalizations linked to salmonella

The number of salmonella cases linked to onions from the United States continues to rise in Canada.


Tropical storm Isaias expected to bring heavy rain, wind gusts to eastern Canada

The tropical storm that has lashed parts of the eastern United States should be diminished in strength by the time it reaches eastern Canada.


Update: Victim Identified in Fatal Motorcycle crash

Update: The Victim in Sunday’s fatal crash in Milton has been identified as Edwin Velazquez, 27 of Milton. At approximately 12:15 a.m. today Troopers assigned to State Police-Milton responded to reports of a crash involving a car and a motorcycle in the area of 330 Truman Parkway in Milton. Upon their arrival they located the…


Dairy Farm launches yuu rewards club to go digital-first

[Sponsored Article]

The retail giant’s new digital-first rewards club is poised to become the most powerful rewards app in Hong Kong, while also marking the first time it connects all its brands under a digital platform.

Under one digital roof

In a first for the Dairy Farm Group, its sprawling business together with coalition partner Jardine Restaurant Group, that comprise over ten household brands encompassing over 2,000 outlets are now digitally connected at a tap of a smartphone screen…


Mum and daughter with cancer reunited after Leicester lockdown

Marian Thomas, 85, had not seen Michelle Teale since March due to Leicester's local lockdown.


Black civil servant accused of car theft while jogging

Dr Andrea Charles Fidelis says she was accused of being a car thief while jogging in Kent.


Saskatoon advocate calls for prisons to be abolished

A spokesperson for the Indigenous Joint Action Coalition said prisons are part of a colonial legacy of oppression and should be replaced.


New Brunswick reports no active cases of COVID-19

New Brunswick is reporting two recoveries, leaving no active cases of the novel coronavirus in the province on Monday.


Weapons Violation

90 Owen Parkway
A couple had finished an early morning walk in Hoyt Park, 90 Owen Parkway.  It was a little after midnight. They noticed another car had & #8230;


Thousands remain evacuated from Southern California wildfire

Evacuation orders remained in place early Monday for thousands of people after a wildfire in mountains east of Los Angeles exploded in size and forced crews to battle flames in … Click to Continue »


Pine Gulch Fire threatens some homes in Mesa, Garfield counties

A wildfire near Grand Junction grew overnight and is now threatening a handful of houses and other structures, though no one has been ordered to evacuate.

The Pine Gulch Fire, which was started by lightning Friday, has burned at least 1,500 acres in remote, steep terrain about 19 miles north of Grand Junction. The blaze neared a home Sunday. Firefighters put down retardant and did some backburning around the home as the fire closed in, and the structure was saved, Bureau of Land Management spokeswoman Maribeth Pecotte said. The family who lived in the home stayed there during the effort.

At least one other home in Garfield County is threatened, and is about a half-mile from the edge of the fire, Pecotte said, and there are several less-developed structures, like sheds and hunting cabins, in the area. No evacuations have been ordered.

Firefighters are working to survey the fire’s overnight growth, Pecotte said, adding she expects the fire is now more than 1,500 acres.

“It grew quite a bit overnight,” she said.


Wildfire map

Click markers for details, use buttons to change what wildfires are shown. Map data is automatically updated by government agencies and could lag real-time events. Incident types are numbered 1-5 — a type 1 incident is a large, complex wildfire affecting people and critical infrastructure, a type 5 incident is a small wildfire with few personnel involved. Find more information about incident types at the bottom of this page.


New building at Verdun Hospital will add 36 beds as early as next year

The Verdun Hospital will add 36 new beds, with the construction of a new building, set to be completed in the beginning of next year.


Rescue squads search for person who jumped from bridge into Tennessee River

DECATUR, Ala. – Decatur Police say the Decatur Rescue Sqad and the DPD Boat Unit are in the Tennessee River right now looking for someone who jumped off a bridge.

The department says officers were called to the Southern Railway Drawbridge at approximately 6:30 Monday morning. The officers negotiated with that person fore about an hour.

The department says the person jumped from the bridge around 7:50.


Vermont State Police – Watch Commander schedule, August 3rd – 9th

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   Watch Commander Schedule for the week of: August 3rd – 9th, 2020   Please follow the attached instructions for contacting the Watch Commanders.   Watch Commander – North Lieutenant Jerry Partin Jerry.Partin@Vermont.gov     Watch Commander – South Lieutenant Casey Daniell Casey.Daniell@Vermont.gov      


Vermont State Police – Watch Commander schedule, August 3rd – 9th

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   Watch Commander Schedule for the week of: August 3rd – 9th, 2020   Please follow the attached instructions for contacting the Watch Commanders.   Watch Commander – North Lieutenant Jerry Partin Jerry.Partin@Vermont.gov     Watch Commander – South Lieutenant Casey Daniell Casey.Daniell@Vermont.gov      


Drayton Manor theme park enters administration

Drayton Manor was forced to close during Storm Dennis and was unable to reopen due to coronavirus.


Watch Live: Decatur City officials share a COVID-19 update

DECATUR, Ala. – The weekly COVID-10 update in Decatur is scheduled to begin at 10:00 a.m.

Guests will include Alabama Department of Public Health Administrator for the Northern District Judy Smith and Decatur City Schools Superintendent Dr. Michael Douglas.


Did your bull run off? Florence Police may have found it

FLORENCE, Ala. – Did your bull run off? Florence Police may have found it.

Animal Control officers found a bull at Wildwood on Cypress at County Road 14 Monday morning.

If you know who owns the bull, you should call Florence Police at (256) 760-6610.


RE: Road Closure – Rt7 Rutland Town

Roadway is no open       From: Zavorotny, Ryan Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 7:12 AM To: DPS - Roadway Alert ; DPS - B1 Disp Subject: Road Closure - Rt7 Rutland Town   State of Vermont   Department of Public Safety   Vermont State Police   Rutland Barracks     Press Release –


From Illegal Pete’s margarita recipe to Aspen Music Fest, here’s free online entertainment that’s actually pretty great

Yes, museums, eateries and entertainment venues are opening back up, but not everyone can — or even wants to — go back out.

In the spirit of staying home (and maybe you ought to) here are some actually amazing, and truly varied, options for home entertainment.

Live from Vail, the classical show goes on

The Bravo! Vail Music Festival has been attempting the improbable this summer, staging a series of concerts before a live audience during a pandemic that has shut down nearly every other classical fest in the country. It’s an abbreviated season, just a handful of small ensemble-chamber concerts instead of the usual orchestral fare, and there are just a few hundred spectators permitted in an amphitheater that normally seats 2,500.

Is performing live the right thing to do when it might be better for everyone to stay apart? I’m not sure. Is the music spectacular? I can say, without hesitation, that the July 23 performance of Haydn’s String Quartet in D minor by the Dover Quartet was one of the best concerts I have experienced — ever.

Of course, I watched the free, live simulcast online and that’s my recommendation for enjoying the final event on Aug. 6 that has superstar pianists Yefim Bronfman and fest director Anne-Marie McDermott set to play Schubert and Brahms.

For info on the concert and how to watch live, follow the instructions at bravovail.org. (Do this in advance.)

The best local podcast of summer

At first, the new podcast “Remotely Creative” seemed a little desperate. Like a lot of schools, the Rocky Mountain College of Art+Design was forced to close its campus, and this audio interview program seemed like a last-chance attempt to keep conversations about art going.

Turns out, it’s smart, relevant and sometimes fascinating. Host Robb Fladry, RMCAD’s dean of students, takes a humble, low-key approach as he talks with “artists, designers and wildcards about how they’re surviving in the era of COVID-19 isolation.”

The lineup is a variety show with a wide range of topics and guests, like artist Frankie Toan, who chatted about mask-making and queer gardening; or RMCAD student Jovan Brock, who talked about organizing anti-racism protests in Denver and Boulder; and stylist Candice Lambert, who explained how she dresses pop stars for music videos and photoshoots.

All 15 of the archived episodes are interesting in their own way, and the series will continue indefinitely, as plans for reopening the campus remain in flux.

Search for it on your favorite podcast player or catch it here: rmcad.edu/remotelycreative.

New dance in dangerous times

The annual Vail Dance Festival opted to go digital this summer, responding to the pandemic with a mini-season that combines archived performances, live conversations and a virtual gala.

There is one evening of new works, and it looks promising: the Aug. 4 program titled “NOW: Premieres,” with pieces choreographed specifically for virtual presentation. On the bill is “Mercy,” created by Bobbi Jene Smith to music by Max Richter, with dancing from Smith, Melissa Toogood and Calvin Royal III; and “A Summer Place,” a solo piece choreographed by and starring Robert Fairchild, which uses music by Max Steiner, Jim Jacobs and George Gershwin.

The works were filmed in advance for the 2020 showcase, so expect them to be part of a polished line-up of contemporary dance. Vail artistic director Damian Woetzel hosts the events.

Tune in via Facebook or youtube. Info, program notes and instructions at vaildance.org.

Music for the moment

The tumult of the past few months has provided serious inspiration for the Denver poet, writer, motivator and music-maker who goes by the name Molina Speaks.

Molina was a force behind April’s boredom-busting showcase of local artists, actors and poets titled the “Digital Gift Basket,” and he’s been working on new verse and music as well.

He just released the track “That Futuristic,” and it’s worth repeat listenings. The song features beats by Diles and a strong anti-racist and, ultimately, hopeful message. The lyrics are heartfelt, the language is strong (you’ve been warned), and the sentiment is right-on-time.

“That Futuristic,” part of a soon-to-be released album of fresh material, is available, along with a lot of the artist’s past work at molina.bandcamp.com.

RELATED: The “Gift Basket” is a heartfelt, and urgent, present from Denver artists to all of us

Classical in your living room

The cancellation of live events scheduled for this year’s Aspen Music Festival means 2020 will pass without all of those amazing afternoons and evenings of world-level concerts that have come to define swell summers in the mountain hamlet.

There is a bright side, though. The fest is offering an abbreviated season of shows, it’s all free, and it comes directly to your living room via the web.

There’s plenty of excellent music in the mix: an Aug. 9 recital featuring violinist Stefan Jackiw and pianist Jeremy Denk; an Aug. 12 faculty and student showcase with singer Renée Fleming and others; and an Aug. 16 solo concert by pianist Andreas Haefliger.

There are also live chats with artists and fest staff that will allow audience members to pop in with their own questions.

Check out the schedule, in advance, on the website aspenmusicfestival.com, where you can also tune in for the live events.

And finally, have a drink, using illegal Pete’s super-secret marg recipe

In the spirit of getting Denver though the worst summer ever, the region’s most interesting Mexican food chain, Illegal Pete’s, shared the secret recipe for its beloved house margarita. Folks like me have enjoyed scores (and scores) of these magic sweet and sour cocktails over the years, and were missing them mightily when Pete’s shut down over coronavirus concerns,

This generous gift will keep on giving homemade hangovers for years to come.

The great divulge came on Cinco de Mayo via Pete’s Instagram feed in a quick, 2-minute video that features a bartender assembling the concoction for public consumption. It remains on the web, even though Pete’s is back open (with some of the most strictly enforced safety protocols of any restaurant in town). So, while you can make these drinks at home, you might also consider getting one out — when you feel comfortable — so the bartenders can make actual tips.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, In The Know, to get entertainment news sent straight to your inbox.


Bureau of Parks and Lands updates water activity restrictions at four coastal State Parks until further notice

AUGUSTA -Today, the Bureau of Parks and Lands (BPL) removed water activity restrictions at Popham, Ferry, and Crescent Beach State Parks. Water activities at Reid State Park remain limited to waist-deep, because of a lifeguard shortage. BPL thanks visitors for their continued understanding and cooperation. Maine State Park news and condition reports are regularly posted to social">https://www.facebook.com/mainedacf/">social media and parksandlands.com.">http://www.parksandlands.com">parksandlands.com.


Police: Woman found dead after car crash had died earlier

A woman found dead at the scene of a Southern California car crash was killed before the collision and police have arrested a homicide suspect, authorities said. The body of … Click to Continue »


Saint Louis Zoo’s elephant calf dies 27 days after birth

ST. LOUIS (KTVI) — The male Asian elephant calf born July 6 at the Saint Louis Zoo was euthanized and “passed away peacefully” Sunday morning.

The zoo said their elephant care team worked hard to care for the calf, but he “had developmental impairments that limited his ability to feed since birth.”

SAINT LOUIS ZOO

“Everyone here is just devastated right now. Our team of professional elephant care experts did everything possible to help improve the calf’s health,” Jeffrey P. Bonner, Ph.D., CEO of the zoo, said in a statement. “Unfortunately, in the end, it just wasn’t enough as his health complications were too severe.”

Despite extensive efforts to help the calf thrive, the zoo said he did not improve and his health “deteriorated rapidly” over just 48 hours.

“The decision to humanely euthanize the calf was made and he passed away peacefully,” the zoo said.

The keepers named him Avi (pronounced AH-vee), meaning “the sun and air.”

“The animal care team who worked so closely with this calf every day of his short life, and all those who loved him, are understandably grieving,” Luis Padilla, DVM, vice president of animal collections for the zoo, said in the statement. “Avi will be missed, but never forgotten.”

His mother, Rani, was near her calf “at every minute,” the zoo said.

Rani was bred with an elephant named Raja, the first Asian elephant born in the zoo.  Avi was her third calf.


Ingersoll Ont., woman, 22, identified as victim in fatal in pedestrian-truck collision: OPP

Police say a pedestrian pushing a stroller was crossing the road Friday when a transport truck hit her.


Fauci tells WGN News he is ‘cautiously optimistic’ vaccine will be effective, available early 2021

U.S. health officials are warning that the nation is entering a new phase of the pandemic, as COVID-19 cases continue to spread in urban and rural areas.

Some officials fear the U.S. still doesn’t have a grasp on the pandemic.

Most states are seeing a week-over-week rise in test positivity rate for the coronavirus, a strong indicator of how the virus is spreading.

The CDC’s new forecast predicts nearly 20,000 more COVID-related deaths by August 22.

That breaks down to close to a thousand deaths per day between now and then.

Dr. Anthony Fauci spoke to the WGN Morning News Monday.

“This is not a trivial disease to be taken lightly,” he said. “It’s historic in its proportions and should be taken seriously.”

Fauci said he is “cautiously optimistic” the vaccine that is in development now will be effective.

“The earliest studies that we did in Phase 1 showed that in an unlimited number or people, that it induced the kind of response, namely a good, neutralizing antibody response, which is the gold standard,” he said. “It induces it at a level equivalent to, if not even better, than when you recover from natural infection ..  that’s a very good sign.”

Fauci said a vaccine could be available at the beginning of next year.  

To enroll in the vaccine trials, go to coronaviruspreventionnetwork.org.


Hong Kong third wave: plans for at least two temporary Covid-19 hospitals and expanded makeshift facilities will boost capacity by 2,400 beds

Hong Kong will build at least two temporary hospitals for Covid-19 patients and expand existing makeshift facilities with the help of mainland Chinese experts deployed to the city, adding as many as 2,400 beds to capacity, the Post has learned.The plans, which include an up to tenfold rise in daily coronavirus testing, were revealed on Monday as Hong Kong broke a 12-day streak of triple-digit increases in new Covid-19 cases, confirming another 80 infections. The city’s tally stood at 3,589…


U.S. border communities feel loss of Canadian tourists, shoppers and friends

Many American businesses along the border say they miss both the revenue and the familiar Canadian faces.


Ann Heron murder: ‘New suspect’ identified in 30-year-old case

A violent criminal who had fled prison may have cut the 44-year-old's throat, an investigator says.


South Dakota awarded $6.9 million Rethink K-12 Education Models Grant

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the South Dakota Department of Education a Rethink K-12 Education Models Grant in the amount of $6,883,481 to support the state?s efforts to better serve students during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. South Dakota is one of only 11 states to be awarded one of these grants. Thirty-nine states applied.


Canadian Museum for Human Rights closing to allow review of racism report

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights will shut down for two days this week as the first phase of a review on systemic racism is released.


2 teen lacrosse players score goal in fight against hunger

Owen Estee and Zach Appel found a way to both teach the sport that they love and help feed people in need when their lacrosse season was canceled because of … Click to Continue »


Detective Bureau

MEDIA CONTACT: 764-5606 Major John C. Alfred, Detective Commander

No arrests to report.


2020-08-03

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Monday, August 3, 2020

N.S. health officials warn of potential COVID-19 exposure on July 12 flight from Toronto

Officials say the West Jet flight departed Toronto at 9:45 p.m. and landed in Halifax just after midnight on July 13.


Tenth Annual South Dakota Timed Event Championship Rodeo Planned for the 2020 South Dakota State Fair

The tenth annual South Dakota Timed Event Championship (SDTEC) Rodeo sponsored in part by Panhandle, LG Seeds, and Double D Western will be held September 5 and 6 in at the South Dakota State Fairgrounds in Huron during the 2020 South Dakota State Fair.


Metrolink tram in ‘near-miss’ as driver failed to stop

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Harrogate Town promotion a ‘superb lift’ after lockdown

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Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

Shannon Dunn has to report to her job this week as a cafeteria manager at an elementary school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but she has no idea what she will do when her daughter starts kindergarten with online-only instruction.

With a new school year beginning this week in some states, Dunn, like many other working parents, is struggling to balance her job with her child’s schoolwork as the coronavirus pandemic continues to cause upheaval around the country. The death toll in the U.S. has reached about 155,000, and cases are rising in numerous states.

Dunn’s East Baton Rouge district has asked employees to begin work this week, while students are set to begin virtual classes next week. School officials have said they hope to begin in-person classes after Labor Day.

“My family works. I have no one I can take her to and say, `OK, at 12 o’clock you are going to have to start working online with her for school,’” Dunn said.

Parents in Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee are among those who will be the first to navigate the new academic year as schools open up in parts of those states this week.

In Indiana, where schools reopened last week for the first time since a pandemic-driven nationwide shutdown in March, a student at Greenfield-Central Junior High School tested positive for the coronavirus on the first day back to class.

School Superintendent Harold Olin said the student was tested days earlier and attended class before receiving the results. The student was isolated in the school clinic, while school nurses worked to identify other youngsters or staff who may have had close contact with the student.

“This really does not change our plans,” Olin said. “We knew that we would have a positive case at some point in the fall. We simply did not think it would happen on Day One.”

Schools in Hawaii were supposed to reopen Tuesday, but the teachers union led a move to delay that until Aug 17.

Most schools in the state are planning a hybrid approach, with students alternating between in-person classes and online instruction. Some schools will have full in-person instruction for lower grade levels, but only a few schools will offer a full-time, in-person return.

Many school districts around the country had offered parents a choice of at least some in-person classes or remote instruction. But an uptick in COVID-19 cases in many states has prompted districts to scrap in-person classes at least for the start of the school year, including Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington.

Dunn said she hopes her daughter will be able to attend in-person classes at her school after Labor Day. But even if she does, that will not ease Dunn’s mind completely.

“I’m definitely going to worry,” she said. “I will send her to in-person classes, but if I hear of the spread of COVID at the school, then I’d have to rethink it all over again.”

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Burglars who targeted Raheem Sterling’s home jailed

Three men admitted a string of break-ins, including at the home of England star Raheem Sterling.


RE: Derby Barracks / Missing Person

…UPDATE……   Ms. Velander has been located safe and sound.     EXTERNAL SENDER: Do not open attachments or click on links unless you recognize and trust the sender. VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE - Missing Person         CASE#: 20a502990 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME:  Sgt. Andrew Jensen


‘Our customers are 90 per cent Canadian’: U.S. border businesses struggle amid COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has put cross-border shopping trips and vacations on hold since March, and many American businesses along the border say they miss both the revenue and the familiar Canadian faces.


National security law: Beijing suspends Hong Kong’s extradition treaty with New Zealand in tit-for-tat move

China has suspended Hong Kong’s extradition treaty with New Zealand in retaliation for the island nation abandoning its side of the deal over the controversial national security law imposed on the city earlier this summer.Beijing officials also accused the Wellington government of politicising judicial cooperation and gross interference in China’s internal affairs when they announced the tit-for-tat move on Monday, marking the latest in a series of collapsed fugitive agreements co-signed by…


Californians renting out their backyard pools amid coronavirus closures

(KTLA) — With a heatwave scorching Southern California and many pools still closed to curb the spread of the coronavirus, homeowners are renting out their backyard pools on an hourly basis for some extra cash.

One Los Angeles couple, Cooky and Alain Bali, said they’ve made about $7,000 by opening their pool to strangers.

The couple used Swimply, a small start-up that lets people offer their backyard pool for rent by the hour for a 15% service fee.

The website had 165 pools listed in the L.A. area Sunday, with prices ranging from $30 to $75 per hour.

Some pools are touted for being “kid-friendly,” others as “resort-like,” and some listings say surfaces are disinfected between visits.

Fearing crowding at beaches and with many indoor settings such as theaters closed, homeowners say the private pools offer a safe way to cool off in the summer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said there’s no evidence that the coronavirus can be transmitted to people through water in pools.


‘My father ignored medical expertise and now he has COVID,’ Rep. Louie Gohmert’s daughter says

AUSTIN (KXAN) — The daughter of Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert has said that her father has COVID-19 because he “ignored medical expertise.”

“This has been a heartbreaking battle because I love my dad and don’t want him to die,” said Rep. Gohmert’s daughter Caroline, a recording artist also known as BELLSAINT.

The 66-year-old politician was diagnosed ahead of a planned trip with President Donald Trump to the Permian Basin in Texas. The diagnosis forced him to cancel the trip.

In an interview with KETK on Wednesday, Rep. Gohmert said he had no symptoms. On Friday, he tweeted that he was taking hydroxychloroquine, the controversial drug touted by President Donald Trump as a treatment for COVID-19.

Prior to his diagnosis, Rep. Gohmert had been adamant about not wearing a mask around Capitol Hill.

In a powerful statement posted on Twitter, his daughter Caroline said that “wearing a mask is a non-partisan issue.”

“The advice of medical experts shouldn’t be politicized,” she wrote. “My father ignored medical expertise and now he has COVID.”

She described his battle as “heartbreaking” and urged people to listen to medical experts.

“It’s not worth following a president who has no remorse for leading his followers to an early grave,” she added.

Rep. Gohmert is not the only Texas politician to have tested positive for the virus.

State Rep. Tony Tinderholt, an Arlington Republican, told the Texas Tribune he was hospitalized after testing positive for COVID-19.

“I truly thought last Friday was gonna be my last,” he told the Tribune in a text message.

He said he is recovering after receiving treatment in a hospital.


Coronavirus conspiracies spreading at alarming rates across Canada, experts say 

Researchers say conspiracy theories about COVID-19 are spreading at an alarming rate across the country -- and they warn misinformation shared online may lead to devastating consequences.


Telford father Jonathan Stevens ‘died a hero saving children’

Kim Stevens said her brother Jonathan, from Telford, had been on a day trip to Barmouth.


Homicide: 1800 Block of Alabama Avenue, Southeast

Monday, August 3, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch are investigating a homicide that occurred on Sunday, August 2, 2020, in the 1800 block of Alabama Avenue, Southeast.

 

At approximately 8:18 pm, members of the Seventh District responded to the listed location for the report of a shooting. Upon arrival, officers located an adult male victim suffering from a gunshot wound. DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene and transported the victim to an area hospital for treatment of life threatening injuries. After all life-saving efforts failed, the victim was pronounced dead.

The decedent has been identified as 21 year-old Troy Coleman, of Southeast, DC.

 

The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up to $25,000 to anyone that provides information which leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for any homicide committed in the District of Columbia. Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the police at 202-727-9099. Additionally, anonymous information may be submitted to the department’s TEXT TIP LINE by sending a text message to 50411.


Calera Fire Department helps toddler stuck in a jam

CALERA, Ala. (WIAT) — Toddlers are always finding new things to get their hands on, or in this case, get their hands in.

Kris Watson posted a video on her Facebook over the weekend showing her 2-year-old son, Grant Watson McKinley, with his arm stuck in a vase.

In the video, Watson said, he stuck a flute inside the vase and stuck his harm inside trying to get it out, but then he also found himself stuck inside.

She took him to the Calera Fire Department and our front line workers were able to help the family out. With a few tugs and turns, the vase eventually slipped off and the toddler’s arm reappeared without a scratch.

Thankful to the fire department amid the coronavirus pandemic, Watson shared her son’s experience at the Calera Fire Department and Grant even got to take a picture on the huge fire truck.


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VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A303262 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Casey Ross                              STATION: Middlesex Barracks                    CONTACT#: 802-229-9191   DATE/TIME: 8/2/2020 INCIDENT LOCATION: VT Route 302, Orange, VT VIOLATION: Larceny From Building


Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

(AP) — Shannon Dunn has to report in person to her job this week as a cafeteria manager at an elementary school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but she has no idea what she’ll do when her daughter starts kindergarten with online-only instruction.

As a new school year begins this week in some states, Dunn, like many working parents, is struggling to balance her job with her child’s school work as the coronavirus pandemic continues to cause upheaval in school districts around the country.

Dunn’s East Baton Rouge school district has asked school employees to begin work this week, while students are set to begin virtual classes next week. School officials have said they hope to begin in-person classes after Labor Day.

“My family works. I have no one I can take her to and say, okay, at 12 o’clock you are going to have to start working online with her for school,” Dunn said.

Parents in Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee are among those who will be the first to navigate the new academic year as schools open up in parts of those states this week.

In Indiana, where schools reopened last week for the first time since a pandemic-driven nationwide shutdown in March, a student at Greenfield-Central Junior High School tested positive for the coronavirus on the first day back to class. School Superintendent Harold Olin told The Associated Press that the student was tested for the virus days earlier and attended school before receiving the results. The student was isolated in the school clinic, while school nurses worked to identify other students or staff who may have had close contact with the student.

“This really does not change our plans,” Olin said. “We knew that we would have a positive case at some point in the fall. We simply did not think it would happen on Day One.”

Schools in Hawaii were supposed to reopen Tuesday, but the teachers union led a move to delay that until Aug 17.

Most schools in the state are planning a hybrid approach, with students alternating between attending in-person classes and online instruction. Some schools will have full in-person instruction for younger grade levels, but only a handful of schools will offer a full-time, in-person return.

Many school districts around the country had offered parents a choice of at least some in-person classes or remote instruction. But an uptick in COVID-19 cases in many states has prompted school districts to scrap in-person classes at least for the start of the school year, including Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington.

Dunn said she hopes her daughter will be able to attend in-person classes at her school after Labor Day. But even if she does, that will not ease her mother’s mind completely.

“I’m definitely going to worry,” Dunn said.

“I will send her to in-person classes, but if I hear of the spread of COVID at the school, then I’d have to rethink it all over again.”


Salt Creek Levee Trail Near Haymarket to Temporarily Close Thursday

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Quebec seeing spike in drownings compared to rest of Canada: Lifesaving Society

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As a new week begins, here’s why you don’t have that second stimulus check

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — Both Republicans and Democrats want to send Americans a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks as part of the next coronavirus aid package. Though recent negotiations have been described as “productive,” there’s a new report the Trump administration is considering unilateral action to get relief to Americans.

Talks on the huge relief measure are set to resume Monday focusing on restoring a newly expired $600-per-week supplemental unemployment benefit.

Principal negotiators – Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi – met over the weekend in hopes of breaking a week long stalemate.

Speaking to reporters, negotiators on both sides said that the talks were “productive” and would continue this week.

The Washington Post reports the two sides remain far off, which has the Trump administration examining ways it can provide aid if a wide-ranging package isn’t approved by Congress. The Post notes it’s not clear what steps the administration could take without the help of lawmakers.

The administration is willing to extend the $600 jobless benefit, at least in the short term, but is balking at other demands of Democratic negotiators like aid for state and local governments, food stamp increases, and assistance to renters and homeowners.

Unemployment insurance is a principal element as the COVID-19 relief bill is expected to grow considerably from a $1 trillion-plus GOP draft released this week.

The $600 per week jobless benefit officially lapsed on Friday and Democrats have made it clear that they will not extend it without securing other relief priorities.

Whatever unemployment aid negotiators agree on will be made retroactive – but antiquated state unemployment systems are likely to take weeks to restore the benefits.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s initial $1 trillion HEALS Act proposal released last week was in stark contrast to a $3 trillion package previously approved by House Democrats.  While many hoped the proposal would quickly receive the green light, that has not been the case. Speaking to reporters Thursday, Meadows said he even doubted a deal could be struck during the upcoming week.

McConnell may have seen this coming. He warned the timeline for passing an aid package might be weeks and not days during an appearance last week in Ashland, Kentucky.

“Hopefully we can come together behind some package we can agree on in the next few weeks,” McConnell said.

Not only has the process kept many unemployed Americans exposed with COVID-related insurance expiring last week but that means it would take that much longer for $1,200 direct payments to be distributed.

CNET estimated that if the GOP plan were to make it through Congress in the next few days, it’s possible checks would be distributed in mid to late August. 

However, McConnell’s timeline indicating “weeks” could potentially push the payments even later.

The Senate is set for a recess after Friday, August 7 that would run through Labor Day.

More money for dependents

The GOP plan calls for checks up to $1,200 for most taxpayers plus an additional $500 for any dependent. The word “any” is the change that could result in additional dollars.

According to Yahoo Finance, parents of older high schoolers and college students claimed as dependents would get the bonus. This also includes anyone taking care of elderly relatives who are also claimed as dependents.

In the first round of stimulus payments, only parents of dependents under 17 received the additional $500.

“We also include, in the additional $500 for each dependent, some people that we didn’t intend to leave out last time, but we did,” Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Monday. “So regardless of age, some of these dependents will now be helped.”

A Democratic plan approved in the House back in May proposed a similar structure for dependents but with the amount being $1,200 instead of $500.

President Trump wants larger checks?

During a visit to West Texas Wednesday, President Donald Trump hinted that a second round of stimulus checks could exceed the $1,200 payment amount issued in the first COVID-19 stimulus package.

When asked if $1,200 was enough, Trump said, “We’re going to see it may go higher than that, actually.”

“I’d like to see it be very high because I love the people, I want the people to get it, you know, the economy is going to come back,” Trump continued. “We saved millions of lives but now we’re bringing (the economy) back … we gotta take care of the people in the meantime.”

How much money will I get?

Outside of the dependent payment, here’s how the payment up to $1,200 breaks down, according to CNBC:

  • Individuals earning a gross adjusted income of up to $75,000 per year in 2019 will receive a $1,200 payment.
  • Couples earning a gross adjusted income of up to $150,000 per year in 2019 will receive a $2,400 payment.
  • The checks will be reduced by $5 for every $100 in income, phasing out completely at $99,000 for individuals and $198,000 for couples.
  • Individuals with no income and individuals who rely on benefits such as Social Security are eligible for the full $1,200 payment

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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Federal payments don’t come close to covering Colorado hospitals’ COVID-19 losses

Most Colorado health care providers received less than $4,000 in federal funds meant to partly offset their losses due to COVID-19, and even the winners who got far more say the payments haven’t come close to filling their revenue gaps.

The $2.2 trillion economic stimulus bill passed in March included $50 billion for health care organizations, with billions more for specific groups, like rural providers or nursing homes.

Colorado received about $808 million from the general distribution, which was divided among 4,430 outpatient providers, hospitals, emergency response organizations and municipalities. The median payment was $3,940, meaning half of recipients got more and half got less.

The payments ranged from a high of $79.3 million for the University of Colorado Hospital Authority to a low of $1 for a pharmacy in Ignacio, with 27 providers getting $10 or less.

Even the larger payments didn’t fully cover revenue losses from COVID-19, though.

Dan Weaver, spokesman for UCHealth, said the health system lost about $176 million in revenue in March and April as non-emergency procedures were canceled, and could lose more if patients continue to delay care. The system has received a combined $97.5 million, but still needed to ask some employees to take time off this summer, he said. Some executives also gave up their paid vacation time.

“Though the federal assistance has not fully covered our losses, we do appreciate the support which has helped us avoid furloughs, support our employees and continue providing excellent care for our patients,” he said.

Smaller hospitals also recovered only a portion of what they lost. Many rural facilities were exempt from an order halting non-emergency procedures this spring, but put them on hold anyway because they needed to conserve protective equipment in case of local coronavirus outbreaks, said Michelle Mills, CEO of the Colorado Rural Health Center.

The payments have been an important lifeline for rural providers, including the 18 hospitals already operating at a loss before the pandemic hit, Mills said. While none are in imminent danger, it’s possible some could close before the pandemic is over, because the number of procedures likely won’t rebound quickly, she said.

“We’re not really sure what things are going to look like,” she said.

Little funding for children’s care

Hospitals that treated few or no COVID-19 patients also faced substantial losses.

Children’s Hospital Colorado received about $22.1 million, but estimated it lost about $100 million. If revenue declines continue as projected, the federal funds will only offset about 9% of this year’s losses, said David Biggerstaff, executive vice president and chief operating officer for Children’s.

Much of the general federal funding was distributed based on a formula using how much care facilities normally provided to Medicare patients. Typically, children are only eligible for Medicare if they have end-stage kidney disease, which is rare.

A $15 billion pot was available for providers who didn’t get a piece of the $50 billion in general funding, including children’s hospitals, but it was only intended to cover about 2% of the revenue a hospital normally would get from patient care.

Only 148 of the more than 6,000 people hospitalized in Colorado for coronavirus were younger than 20, but Children’s still had extra expenses from expanding telemedicine, setting up a lab for coronavirus testing and collecting plasma from survivors as a possible treatment, Biggerstaff said. The lab processes tests from other facilities, as well as in-house samples, and the plasma program primarily benefited hospitals trying it as a treatment for adult patients, he said.

Any future payments should consider the needs of children’s hospitals, because they’ve been hit hard by revenue losses and don’t turn away families who can’t pay, Biggerstaff said.

“Adult systems and Medicare providers have been given more opportunities then children’s hospitals to offset these devastating losses,” he said.

Smaller pediatric providers have had difficulty getting the payments at all, said Dr. David Keller, a board member of the Colorado chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Most got nothing from the first funding rounds, because they don’t treat any children on dialysis, while others received a minimal check, which then excluded them from more substantial help that became available in June and July, he said.

“There was this tiny amount, and they didn’t know where it was coming from,” he said.

The pandemic has been particularly hard for pediatric practices, because children who weren’t in school didn’t need treatment for common illnesses like flu, Keller said. Now schedules are starting to fill up again as parents schedule routine check-ups during the summer, and some providers don’t have time to work through the glitchy process of applying for financial help, he said.

“A lot of people don’t have the energy to do it right now,” he said. “Practices are strapped. Everybody’s stressed.”

More stimulus could face uphill battle

Trade groups representing hospitals, doctors and nurses have asked Congress to appropriate at least $100 billion more to offset the costs of extra protective equipment, staffing and temporary facilities in areas dealing with outbreaks, and to compensate providers for reduced revenue from canceling procedures and seeing fewer patients.

It’s not clear what the odds of such a large package passing are, though. A Democratic proposal for another stimulus bill includes $100 billion, while the Republican proposal would set aside $25 billion.

Lawmakers in Congress are working on another aid package. Democrats approved a $3 trillion proposal in the House, while Republicans are negotiating on a $1 trillion counteroffer in the Senate.

“]

Peter Banko, president and CEO of Centura Health, which owns the five Adventist hospitals near Denver, said the next round of stimulus, if one passes, should be tailored to address how the pandemic is impacting communities differently. The business unit including the five Adventist hospitals received about $24 million in relief funds, but lost about $80 million from March to June, not counting the cost of buying protective equipment, retrofitting rooms to contain the virus and giving bonuses to frontline employees, he said.

Nikki Sloup, spokeswoman for SCL Health, said that if additional stimulus passes, it would be best to focus on funding testing, contact tracing, personal protective equipment for essential workers and supplies to administer a vaccine when it becomes available.

Saint Joseph Hospital, owned by SCL, was one of the top recipients in Colorado, with $11.5 million from the general distribution and $12.9 million from a “hotspot” fund for hospitals that treated more than 100 people for COVID-19 by April 10.

Sloup estimated Saint Joseph  spent about $3.5 million to prepare for coronavirus patients, not counting staff time, and lost about $37 million by not providing the normal mix of care.

“Volume has recently started to recover but it has not fully restored to normal levels,” she said.

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


Q&A: Denver’s new sheriff on learning from protesters, modeling Denver’s jails after Norway, and more

Denver’s new sheriff is taking over leadership of the city’s two jails at an unprecedented time, as a global pandemic and national civil rights movement are changing the way the country thinks about crime and punishment.

Sheriff Elias Diggins took over as Denver’s jails remain the site of one of the largest COVID-19 outbreaks in the state, 140 of the agency’s 871 deputy positions are unfilled and the names of men killed in the city’s jails have been chanted by protesters in the streets.

Diggins joined the department in 1994 and worked his way through the ranks, including a stint as interim sheriff from 2014 to 2015. He has been in high-ranking positions during the jail’s many controversies over the last several years and has become embroiled in them himself, including a secretly-recorded phone call that cost him his previous position as interim sheriff and a lawsuit alleging he covered up mistreatment of an inmate. Both he and Mayor Michael Hancock acknowledged that history during a news conference announcing his appointment and said it was time for Diggins to have a second chance.

Diggins spoke with The Denver Post on Wednesday about his priorities as sheriff, calls for criminal justice reform and more. The interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.

There is a lot of discussion in the city, and nation, about criminal justice reform. What reforms would you like to see here at the Denver Sheriff Department? 

It’s different from reform. It’s transformation. We have been through a lot of reform over the past few years. We’re now in a state of transformation. Everything that we do, we’ve got to revisit and understand what is the community’s expectation for who the Denver Sheriff Department is. What does the community expect us to be? And through all of the protest, through the civil uneasiness and unrest, law enforcement as a whole has to transform. I want to ensure that humanity is infused in everything that we do, that we lead with our humanity at all times. And that we recognize that the people who are with us — whether they’re in custody or people that we’re dealing with in the community or the courts — that we deal with them in the way that we want somebody to deal with our mom or our dad, treat them with the dignity and respect that we give to our sisters or to our brothers.

The other thing that I want to share with everyone, with our staff, is that we’ve got to understand that deprivation of a person’s freedom is their punishment. We all, through our constitutional rights, are endowed with three inalienable rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And when we take away a person’s inalienable right of liberty, when we take that away, that’s enough. We don’t have to punish anyone further.

In previous interviews, you referenced an interest in following the Norweigan model of incarceration, specifically when it comes to re-entry. Are you interested in looking at the other parts of the Norway model, like creating a homier setting and building more equitable relationships between deputies and inmates? 

I haven’t been to Norway yet. But I have been to Las Colinas, which is the the women’s detention facility run by the San Diego Sheriff’s Department. They have taken the ideas behind that and actually done it in the United States, where the color palettes that are on the walls are something that you would see in your home. The way that the campus is laid out is very open. The housing areas are bright, the furniture, the fixtures, the equipment, everything is done with the sense of understanding that jail doesn’t have to be a hardened environment in order to keep it secure. And that’s what the Norway model is. It’s about understanding that the environment has a direct impact on someone’s psyche while they’re in your custody.

What we have already done is attempt to replicate portions of that with our Building 24 project. We actually sent a group out to San Diego to see the Las Colinas model. If you go to the county jail campus it has different color palettes that are intentional. I would like to eventually see that we move in the future to replicating that in everything that we do.

One of the things that I know is in Norway, and even at Las Colinas, the interaction between the staff and the people in custody is way different. There’s a level of respect that begins with the way that (deputies) address people, they address people with sir and ma’am. And I think that goes far to say that you’re addressing everyone with a sense of dignity. And that begins to let people know that you still have your dignity.

How do you get to people on board with that idea who aren’t already?

Well, we have people that will serve as ambassadors inside of our agency. It’s about ensuring that I’m selecting leaders that actually believe in it that can help to make the transformation, and for those who are a little harder to buy in, perhaps we even take them to some of those places so that they can see how this works. So they can see how the environment can be different and hopefully get them to that place.

Do you plan on making any of those kind of environmental changes at the Downtown Detention Center?

We’ll look around to see where we can do that. The biggest change that you can make something that’s very simple, is changing the color patterns to be more inviting. Jail doesn’t have to be just all stark gray walls. Once we get out of the recession that we’re in and have an opportunity to perhaps change the furniture, fixtures and equipment. There are companies that are now making equipment that is still detention grade. It’s safe in a jail environment. But it’s seats that you see in an office or that you see in a conference room, things of that nature that just look a little bit different than what you see a in a typical jail environment.

The Denver jail population has been hovering at about 50% of its pre-pandemic numbers due to changes in arrests and bond procedures intended to reduce the number of people locked up during COVID-19. Is that something you’d like to see continue in the future, this strategized way to reduce the number of people locked up here?

Absolutely. I absolutely hope that we can stay in the space where we are only jailing people when it’s absolutely necessary. As a last resort.

What are your other priorities for the next six months?

Getting out and talking to our staff and documenting a couple of things. The first is the challenges that they see with our agency, but also what they believe to be the solutions. And I think that’s really where you get those things is from the people that are on the ground that do the work, the rank and file staff, uniform and civilian that can bring those great ideas. So I’m getting out. I’m going to be touring and talking with them. I’m gonna do the same thing with the people that are in our custody and talk to them and also talk to the community.

Speaking of the community, I’m also standing up a board that’s going to meet every single month. The title of it is the Community Employee Leadership Council. It’s gonna include community advocates, as well as some folks that I’m not going to talk about yet because I’m still trying to get them to the table, as well as the leadership of every single employee organization inside the Denver Sheriff’s Department to ensure that our employees have a voice. And that group is going to be completed by myself, my two chiefs, the six majors, and some of our other senior leaders, and we’re going to meet every single month, and we’re going to keep minutes and the leadership team is going to be responsible for responding and taking action on the ideas that are brought to that table.

That’s going to help to lift morale. I think it’s going to help lower attrition. And it’s going to be something that is seen as an effort towards the goodwill that the community expects from the Denver Sheriff Department.

What are the biggest challenges in the department right now?

It’s absolutely retention. When it comes to morale, we’ve got to ensure that we give our staff a voice and that we are actively moving towards those solutions. And so that’s going to be a priority for every single leader in this agency. We have some training to do with some of our supervisors to help them to understand what it means to be a leader. To be able to direct the actions of staff is something that sometimes can be a challenge. But every single supervisor, especially the sergeants, which are the most important leadership rank in our agency, they have got to be comfortable in doing.

Those are probably the biggest challenges for us besides the overall trust that has been broken with the community with all law enforcement and figuring out ways to earn that back.

Did you attend or watch any of the protests that have happened here in the past months?

I was actually deployed during the protest and worked there. And there’s a video on Twitter of the protesters came right up to 14th Avenue to the fence line that we have. There was a mother, who told me that her daughter was so afraid of law enforcement that she was afraid that she was going to die. And she asked me if I would speak to her. I walked up to that fence line with all of my staff back behind me. And I told that young lady that I love her. And we’re here to serve you. We’re here to help.

One of the things that I remember vividly was the protesters chanting, “I don’t see no riot here, why are you in riot gear?” And at the time, we were all dressed with helmets, and all of the gear that you see in those videos, and that changed my perspective. Because at that time, the protesters were generally peaceful, but we continued to dress up. I told our staff, “We’re not going to put that on. Everybody take their helmet off. Unless there is something that we know is a specific threat to us. We’re going to be out here. We’re going to wait in our vehicles, but we’re going to listen to them and we’re not going to be dressed up and all this riot gear because they’re peacefully protesting.”

Are there any specific changes you plan to make in your agency as a result of the protests?

Overall, just that humanity is something that we all have to have in law enforcement. Imagine if the officers that were involved in George Floyd would have led with their humanity. It’s about what do we in uniform. We need to look in the mirror about who we are and what we do.

So you’re talking about a kind of a broader culture change, but nothing absolutely specific.

We have had a lot of changes over the past few years. And we’re ahead of a lot of agencies but we still have a lot of work to do, to really get to the place where the community really believes that the Denver Sheriff’s Department is an agency that they believe in. There are some community members that obviously support us. But there are those that still have some questions about who we are, what we do. And we want everyone to believe that we are a department that understands that we serve the people.


See the L.A. home actress Lori Loughlin sold to Tinder co-founder for $18.75 million

Embattled television actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband Mossimo Giannulli have sold their Bel Air home for $18.75 million to Justin Mateen, co-founder of Tinder. The massive home … Click to Continue »


Federal family leave for parents affected by coronavirus has run out. State workers weigh options

The federal government extended a lifeline to working parents in April when it provided 12 weeks of expanded paid leave for those affected by the coronavirus. The leave has run … Click to Continue »


California may ban African hunting trophies. How Black Lives Matter has altered the debate

California lawmakers this week will debate Black inequality and injustice in an unlikely arena: Trophy hunting. For years, animal rights groups across Western nations, in campaigns often led by white … Click to Continue »


Monday morning traffic stop leads to drug arrest in Owens Cross Roads

OWENS CROSS ROADS, Ala. – Owens Cross Roads Police said a Monday morning traffic stop turned into a drug arrest.

Police said they stopped a vehicle without a license plate at the Circle K in town.

During the investigation, officers discovered the driver, Dylan Benson Hatfield, 25, had no driver’s license and no insurance or license plate on the car.

Police stated they also discovered a substance believed to be marijuana, as well as drug paraphernalia.

Hatfield was booked into the Madison County Jail and was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and second-degree possession of marijuana. His bond was set at $1,000.


USDA announces different species of seeds found inside mysterious packets from China

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it’s identified 14 different species of seeds found inside mysterious packets mailed to places all across the country, including Alabama.

The mysterious packets were found in the mail last Wednesday.

The USDA said it found hibiscus, mint, and sage, as well as other herbs.

Monday at 2 p.m., Alabama Department of Agriculture Commissioner Rick Pate will hold a press conference on the seeds, and what you need to do with them.


Denver weather: Hot with a chance of thunderstorms in the metro area

It’s going to be a hot one Monday with mostly sunny skies and temperatures reaching a high of 90 degrees in the Denver metro area, according to the National Weather Service.

There’s a 50% chance of thunderstorms after 3 p.m. with a slight wind of 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon.

Thunderstorm chances fall to 30% in the evening with a low of 62. Winds could reach up to 18 mph.

A similar forecast is expected for Tuesday and Wednesday with highs of 91 and 88, respectively. There will be 50% chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon and lows of 62 in the evening on both days.


This is the $18.75 million estate Lori Loughlin sold to Justin Mateen

Awaiting sentencing in the college admissions scandal, television actress Lori Loughlin ( "Full House" ) and her fashion-designer husband Mossimo Giannulli have sold their Bel Air home for $18.75 million to Justin Mateen, co-founder of Tinder.
Click to Continue »


Judge decries shooting that killed son, injured husband

A federal judge from New Jersey is publicly speaking out about a shooting at her New Jersey home last month in which authorities say a disgruntled lawyer killed her son … Click to Continue »


Over 7,000 people evacuated due to the Apple Fire in Southern California

(CNN) — An out-of-control wildfire burning in Cherry Valley, California, east of Los Angeles, has grown to over 20,000 acres, forcing thousands of people to evacuate, according to the US Forest Service.

The Apple Fire began Friday shortly before 5 p.m. PST and has forced about 7,800 people to evacuate, Riverside County Fire Department said.

As of Sunday, the Apple Fire has burned over 20,516 acres and has no containment, the Forest Service said. Much of the northeast and eastern edge of the fire is in steep, rugged hillsides, making it inaccessible to firefighting vehicles. Currently, there are 20 hand-crews, 6 helicopters, 178 engines, and 19 water tenders fighting the fire.

No injuries have been reported. A single family home and two outbuildings were destroyed by the fire, the fire department tweeted.

Ian Schoenleber of Big Rock Media shared video of the fire from as seen atop a spot southeast of the blaze on Saturday night.

Evacuation centers have been set up at local hotels and at Beaumont High School, fire department spokesman Rob Roseen told CNN.

All evacuation centers will enforce Covid-19 protocols such as temperature screenings upon entry, masks and social distancing, Roseen said. The cause of the blaze remains under investigation.

There is increased potential for plume growth with fires this weekend because of hot temperatures, very low humidities and onshore winds, according to the National Weather Service.


Students across Lincoln County, Tennessee returning to school Monday

LINCOLN COUNTY, Tenn. – Monday is the first day back at school for students in Fayetteville and Lincoln County.

As they head back to the classroom, things are looking different then they have in the past.

Lincoln County Schools will have a half day today with the first full school day tomorrow.

Fayetteville City Schools is implementing a staggered schedule so some kids come today, more tomorrow and everyone will be back by August 6.

Monday, fourth, fifth, and ninth-grade students head back to the classroom, and the district is implementing a lot of precautions in an effort to protect students and staff.

All teachers and staff will have their temperatures checked daily.

Of course, they will be sanitizing whenever they can and the school district says desks will be spread out as much as possible.

All cafeteria personnel will wear plastic face shields or masks and gloves while preparing and serving food.

Bus service will continue to be provided, but officials are encouraging parents/guardians to transport students themselves whenever possible.

If siblings ride the same bus, they will sit together.

Assigned seating will be enforced on the bus, and masks will be required on buses. They will be provided if necessary.

The district also has a plan in the event there is a spike in cases. If there is a substantial spread, meaning more than one percent of students or 344 active cases of the virus are reported, instruction will move completely virtual.


Wickford Barracks

No arrests to report.

Media Contact: Major Christopher J. Dicomitis, Administrative Commander and Public Information Officer, Rhode Island State Police, 401-764-5603 or rispdps@risp.gov


Knife attack after bout of staring leaves three Hong Kong villagers in hospital, one with life-threatening injuries

A bout of staring between two groups of men sparked a knife attack at a village in northern Hong Kong on Sunday night, leaving three locals in hospital, with one suffering life-threatening injuries.Police arrested one suspect – an asylum seeker from Vietnam – near the crime scene at Fung Kat Heung in Pat Heung shortly after the attack happened at about 9pm on Sunday. As of Monday afternoon, the other two assailants were still on the run.Hong Kong police search for seven after knife attack…


Lancashire PC charged over assault shared on social media

PC Saul Hignett is accused of common assault over an arrest captured on CCTV and shared online.


Alabama Department of Public Health announcing details of COVID-19 tracing app during Monday news conference

Monday, the Alabama Department of Public Health will announce details for the rollout of a COVID-19 contact tracing app.

The app is designed to help identify and notify people who’ve come into with some who has tested positive for the virus.

As students prepare for the fall semester, some virtually and others in person, Dr. Karen Landers with the Alabama Department of Public Health said schools need to be innovative in preparing for students to return to the classroom.

This new contact tracing app is specifically for college students.

Being developed in connection with two of America’s largest tech companies, it is aimed at reducing the number of ADPH personnel needed to provide notice of a positive test and reduce spread of the virus.

The Alabama Department of Public Health announced the project a few months ago, but details have been limited. that’s expected to change at the briefing Monday.

A tool kit was also developed for school systems that include signage and information for students and faculty.

Landers said the kit will also help explain ADPH’s contact and case investigation procedures developed for the upcoming school year

Monday’s briefing will include state health officer Dr. Scott Harris and representatives from UAB. it is not yet clear if the app will be rolled out in time for fall classes.


Wisbech man police feared had been killed found after five years

Ricardas Puisys was found deep in woods, where it is thought he was trying to avoid exploitation.


Road Closure – Rt7 Rutland Town

State of Vermont   Department of Public Safety   Vermont State Police   Rutland Barracks     Press Release – Highway / Traffic Notification     US ROUTE 7 N in Rutland Town is down to one lane in the area of Prospect Hill Rd. due to a motor vehicle accident.   This incident is expected to last until further notice. Specific details are not yet available and updates


COVID 19 Alert app faces accessibility criticism for older Canadians, marginalized groups

The federal government's COVID-19 contact tracing app is facing criticism for its download requirements, which restrict some Canadians from accessing and using the app.


Park Boulevard Closure Starts Tuesday

Beginning at 7 a.m. Tuesday, August 4, Park Boulevard between South and Van Dorn streets will be closed for repairs. Access to businesses will be maintained. This work is scheduled to be completed by Monday, August 10.


Dunkin’s free coffee Mondays begin Aug. 3

(CNN) – If you don’t already love Dunkin, here’s a reason you should start.

The chain announced not only are they bringing back a fan favorite, Free Donut Fridays, but they’re also starting Free Coffee Mondays.

Starting Aug. 3, if you’re a Dunkin Perks member, you can get a free medium coffee, hot or iced, for free. You just have to buy any food item to get the deal.

If you’re not a member, you can sign up with the app.

And for Free Donut Fridays, members get a free classic donut with any drink purchase.

The deals only run through the week of Aug. 17.


Coronavirus: researchers from Hong Kong, Macau hope to start clinical trials of vaccine in months

Researchers from Hong Kong and Macau have developed a vaccine for the coronavirus and hope to start clinical trials within months, aiming to reserve eight million doses for residents of the two cities once it is ready.The team has developed a vaccine which stops a key part of the infection process by preventing the coronavirus from attaching to human cells, and managed to induce a strong immune response as early as seven days after mice, rabbits, and monkeys were injected with the vaccine…


TV doc advice ‘saved boy swept out to sea’

The boy followed the exact advice the RNLI would give to anyone in difficulty, his rescuers say.


Coronavirus: Entries open for Virtual Great North Run

Organisers stress that runners of the free event must follow government social distancing rules.


Hong Kong third wave: face-to-face teaching ban extended at schools but lessons can be held online

The ban on face-to-face teaching at Hong Kong schools has been extended indefinitely beyond August 17, although online lessons can return for the start of the academic year, the education minister revealed on Monday as the city continues its fight against the third wave of Covid-19.Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung Yun-hung told a press conference: “Schools may begin their new school year as planned … but all face-to-face classes and on-campus activities will be suspended until further notice…


Strippers filmed at work end privacy case

Campaigners sent private investigators to film secretly inside two Spearmint Rhino clubs.


Space and Missile Defense Symposium goes virtual for 2020

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. – The annual Space and Missile Defense Symposium will be held virtually August 4 and 5.

An agenda can be download on the symposium website.

LTG Daniel Karbler, commanding general of U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and Thomas Webber, director of the USASMDC Technical Center, will speak to attendees.

LTG Karbler will provide an SMDC update on Tuesday, August 4 from 9:45-10:30 a.m.

Webber will participate in an acquisition panel on Tuesday August 4 from 2:30-3:45 p.m. and a virtual fireside chat on Wednesday, August 5 from 10:15-10:45 a.m.

To register, visit the symposium website.


World Snooker Championship 2020: Ronnie O’Sullivan through to round two

Five-time winner Ronnie O'Sullivan begins his World Championship campaign with a 10-1 demolition of Thailand's Thepchaiya Un-Nooh in Sheffield.


Weapons Violation

3019 E Washington Ave
Madison Police were called to the Mobile Gas Station at 3019 E Washington Ave for a shots fired call. Multiple vehicles and people on foot were & #8230;


Paul Scholes lockdown party claims prompt police visit

Police "speak to" Paul Scholes over claims he held a birthday party for his son during lockdown.


More than 2,500 HKU students, staff, and alumni sign petition against dismissal of Hong Kong legal scholar Benny Tai

More than 2,500 students, staff, and alumni at the University of Hong Kong have signed a petition demanding its governing council withdraw the dismissal of legal scholar and Occupy movement co-founder Benny Tai Yiu-ting.In a petition submitted to the university on Monday, its student union that organised the campaign also urged the council to publicise the justifications of Tai’s dismissal within a week and amend the existing procedures of having government-appointed members sitting on the…


Hong Kong restaurant takings fall 26 per cent as Covid-19 bites sector

Restaurant takings for the second quarter have dropped 26 per cent on last year as Hong Kong’s food and catering sector feels the squeeze from the impact of Covid-19.The Census and Statistics Department revealed on Monday that receipts shrank from HK$28.6 billion (US$3.7 billion) to HK$21.2 billion between April and June year-on-year.Struggling Hong Kong restaurants call for billions in bailout as ban loomsA government spokesman said the decline was lower than the record fall registered in the…


Thousands remain evacuated from Southern California wildfire

Evacuation orders remained in place early Monday for thousands of people after a wildfire in mountains east of Los Angeles exploded in size and forced crews to battle flames in … Click to Continue »


Essex firefighters hoist stuck bull out of ditch

The animal was unharmed despite having been trapped for more than a day.


Cyclist run over ‘in deliberate attack’ in Fleetwood

The victim was left with serious injuries to his arm and leg, police said.


Hong Kong police chief taken to court as man accuses officers of abuse of power over ID card request

A Hong Kong man has taken the city’s police chief to court and accused an officer of abusing his power when he demanded to see his identity card.Ng Ka-lun, a member of the Hong Kong Teaching and Research Support Staff Union, lodged an application for judicial review at the High Court on Friday, challenging the unfettered power of police to inspect residents’ identity cards under the city’s immigration laws.The 35-year-old had been questioned by police while urging people to join trade unions on…


Coronavirus: ‘Relief’ for Leicester businesses out of lockdown

"We are already one month behind," said the owner of a restaurant in Leicester.


See Sites Fire burn along roadway in Colusa County

The Sites Fire burns in Colusa County on Sites Lodoga Road on Sunday night, Aug. 2, 2020. The fire started just after 4 p.m. southeast of Stonyford, and burned 1,000 acres by 7 p.m., prompting mandatory evacuations of several ranch properties. … Click to Continue »


Coronavirus: vandalism of Mong Kok shop linked to a cluster of infections prompts manhunt

A Mong Kok shop, operated by an online retailer linked to a cluster of more than 30 coronavirus infections, was vandalised on Monday, sparking a manhunt for three perpetrators.Police were called to the ground-floor store of Yee On Court on Argyle Street at 12.10am on Monday after a motorist saw three men spray painting offensive slogans on its window, glass doors and wall.Officers scouted the area, but no arrests were made.Detectives from the Kowloon City criminal investigation unit are…


Derby Barracks / Missing Person

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE - Missing Person         CASE#: 20a502990 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME:  Sgt. Andrew Jensen                              STATION: VSP Derby CONTACT#: 334-8881   DATE/TIME: 8/2/20 @ 2228 hrs INCIDENT LOCATION: 538 County Road/Glover, VT   NAME:  Jennifer L. Velander


Liverpool signings: Big names or squad men – who should Jurgen Klopp buy?

Ex-Liverpool players John Barnes, Gary Gillespie and Emile Heskey on how the Premier League champions should strengthen.


Parents struggle as schools reopen amid coronavirus surge

Shannon Dunn has to report in person to her job this week as a cafeteria manager at at elementary school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but she has no idea what … Click to Continue »


Weapons Violation

1600 block Wheeler Rd
A single caller reported hearing 10 gunshots in the 1600 block of Wheeler Rd on Madison's north side. Officers checked the area and did find & #8230;


Hong Kong elections: Beijing sends top official to discuss postponement of Legislative Council vote

A top Beijing official on Hong Kong affairs is in the city to meet various sectors, including legal experts, on the postponement of the Legislative Council elections, the Post has learned.Sources said Zhang Xiaoming, deputy director of the State Council’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, met five members of the Basic Law Committee in Hong Kong on Sunday to get their views on the legal issues arising from the postponement.Lau Siu-kai, vice-president of the semi-official Chinese Association of…


Royalton Barracks Crash injury/DUI

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20B202443                                            RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Adam Roaldi STATION: Royalton Barracks                        CONTACT#: (802) 234-9933   DATE/TIME: 08/01/2020 at approximately 2347 hours STREET: VT route 14 TOWN: Sharon WEATHER:


IDHS LAUNCHES THREE NEW MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS IN ILLINOIS

CHICAGO -The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) today announced three new mental health programs designed to provide additional support for Illinois residents. These new resources will be provided by community organizations through the Living Room Program (LRP), Transitional Living Centers (TLCs), and the Transitional Community Care and Support Programs (TCCS) throughout the state.


HSBC boosts bad loan provisions, sees second quarter profit plunge as coronavirus crushes global business activity

HSBC, the biggest of Hong Kong’s currency-issuing banks, reported a sharp drop in profit and dramatically boosted its provisions for soured loans for a second time this year as the coronavirus pandemic weighed heavily on business activity globally in the second quarter.It also said it would “accelerate” plans to cut costs first announced in February.The lender took a less optimistic tone than Hong Kong rival Standard Chartered in terms of potential loan losses for the second half of the year,…


Hong Kong elections: Article 23, barred lawmakers and voting rights – some of the thorny issues awaiting the next Legislative Council

The decision by Hong Kong’s leader to delay legislative elections for a year due to the coronavirus pandemic has pushed the city’s two political camps even farther apart.But they agree on one fundamental matter: the next assembly would be a full-fledged one scrutinising and passing policy proposals and funding requests, instead of restricting itself to only handling essential business.Lawmakers could be asked to vote on several controversial issues, including amending election laws to allow…


Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis honored with vigil in Huntsville

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Local activists with the Tennessee Valley Progressive Alliance hosted a candlelight vigil in Big Spring Park Sunday night to honor the late John Lewis.

Organizers said it’s important to pause and honor his legacy.

“Because of the work that we are actually doing as activists in the area and also calling for some changes within the way the government is functioning right now, it’s especially important for us as a way to encourage one another and motivate each other to follow his example,” said Angela Curry with United Women of Color.

The vigil included guest speakers, voter registration and a special photo presentation projected on the side of City Hall.


Hong Kong third wave: death toll climbs as source says new hospital to be built near city’s airport

A 83-year-old Covid-19 patient died on Monday morning, bringing Hong Kong’s coronavirus-related death toll to 36.The news came as a source said land next to the AsiaWorld-Expo exhibition centre, near the city’s airport, had been chosen as the site of a second temporary hospital.Monday’s death involved a man who lived at Kong Tai Care for the Aged Centre Limited in Tsz Wan Shan. He was the ninth fatality in the cluster at the facility, which has been linked to 45 infections.Tuen Mun Hospital…


Miracle Bash and Swim for Melissa are different this year

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – The 15th annual Swim for Melissa and Miracle Bash are coming up in a few weeks. But because of COVID-19, things will be different this year. The events are major fundraisers each year for the Melissa George Neonatal Memorial Fund.

It was set up by Chris and Amy George after the death of their daughter shortly after her birth. Money from the events is used to buy equipment and support programs for the Regional Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Huntsville Hospital for Women and Children.

Both will still happen, but they’ll be different. “Taking a year off just didn’t feel like an option for us because the need is still there,” co-founder Amy George said, “And we promise that on Saturday August 22nd, we’ll make it worth your while.”

Amy and her husband Chris are asking kids to sign up and raise money for Melissa’s fund just like they do every year. Instead of going to the pool, they’ll drive the Miracle Mile on Jaycee Way at John Hunt Park. “They’re going to stay in their cars and they’re going to drive through this parade,” Amy said with a huge smile, “That’s where they’re going to get their t-shirt. It’s where they’re going to get their prizes. We’re going to have treats for them.”

Later that evening, Miracle Bash attendees will drive the Miracle Mile. “We’re not going to all go and gather together like we have in the past,” Amy said, “But, people are still going to be able to bid online for all of those silent auction items.” And there will be food. “We will treat them to dinner, and we’ll give them dinner to take home and some other fun things, a t-shirt and some other things,” Amy added.

It’ll be a carry out meal. “They can take the food back home and eat it or maybe you know they can drive somewhere and pop the trunk up and tailgate,” she said with a laugh. You can also buy a yard sign to show support for kids who were in the NICU or a family who made the journey. “Maybe they’re not in a position right now to be able to purchase that yard sign but you can,” Amy told me, “We’d love for you to do that. We want to line that entire mile with nothing but pictures of these kids.”

A lot of non-profits are in the same boat right now. “We’re just grateful for whatever people can do because we know this is a hard time for everyone,” Amy said, “We’re all struggling.” When I asked what she and Chris would miss the most about the swim this year, she paused and said, “Seeing the kids and families. It’s like a yearly reunion for our family.”

Hopefully both events will be bigger and better next year. “I have to believe this is a bump in the road and one day we’ll look back and we’ll go, man, that 2020 was a crazy year wasn’t it,” Amy said smiling, “But maybe one day we`ll be back to normal.”


Two multi-million dollar projects in the works for Huntsville police

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – The Huntsville City Council has allocated millions to help the Huntsville Police Department continue to protect and serve the area. A Huntsville Police Department spokesperson says they excited for the opportunity to grow and modernize. It’s an opportunity with a $13 million price tag to build a new training center and firing range.

“The last thing you want to do is take money out of the police agency that’s trying to protect the public. The public wants protection. You want highly trained personnel to do that,” said Lt. Michael Johnson.

For the first time in 50 years, Huntsville police will have a dedicated training facility. The ‘Public Safety Training Facility’ will house police and fire training. Huntsville City Council approved a $10.2 million contract with Fite Construction to build the center along Triana Boulevard. The department currently uses the former Johnson High School. Huntsville police say the upgrade is needed.

“The facilities had to be upgraded for what we needed and could actually be upgraded more so we looked at having our own brand new facility where we can construct everything we need,” Johnson said.

Construction will take just over a year. City leaders expect the new center to open by the summer of 2021.

Huntsville police are also getting a new firing range in partnership with the FBI. The firing range is on 50 acres and will include 50-yard handgun lanes, 600-yard rifle lanes, classrooms and other indoor amenities.

The department says it will give opportunities for more realistic scenario-based training and to host outside agencies.

“There’s actually going to be a portion of it that’s covered. We’ve got some indoor facilities. We’re also going to have an area of the range that is almost a 360-degree type range where we have more realistic training,” Johnson said.

The FBI is contributing $7 million to that $10 million project, leaving Huntsville to pay for only $3 million. It is expected to open in the Fall of 2020.

“Training costs money. You’ve gotta have the physical facilities. You’ve gotta have the staff,” Johnson said.

The Huntsville Police Department employs just under 700 people and as the city grows, so will the number of officers. HPD officials say the new facilities will create better training opportunities for the future.


How can study of social sciences and humanities help overcome global crises such as Covid-19 pandemic?

[Sponsored article]

The global race to find a vaccine for the coronavirus disease, Covid-19, has scientists and medical experts in 30 countries working around the clock. Even with a vaccine, life as we know it may never be the same again. Experts say the future is reliant on the strategies of governments, and how people adapt their daily lives.

The battle against the Covid-19 pandemic requires the effort of individuals from all professional fields, including social sciences and humanities,…


St. Johnsbury Barracks / DUI#2 (Refusal) & Criminal DLS

VSP News Release-Incident   STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20A403865 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: TPR. NICHOLAS CIANCI                            STATION: VSP ST. JOHNSBURY                  CONTACT#: 802-222-4680   DATE/TIME: 8/2/2020 @ 1855 HOURS INCIDENT LOCATION: STARK ROAD LYNDON, VT VIOLATIONS:               1.


Can coronavirus testing be sped up? Spirit of Hong Kong Awards nominee is on a mission to do so

As demand for Covid-19 testing in Hong Kong surges amid a third wave of infections, and test results could take days to come in, Kelvin Chiu Wun is in a bid to speed up the process.Under his leadership, a team at Sanwa Biotech has developed a personalised respiratory diagnostic solution that can be applied to coronavirus tests and produce results within a shorter time frame.Chiu said the portable system could be installed at elderly care homes and border checkpoints to ease the burden on…


Information

Northport Drive at North Sherman Ave
City of Madison Police Officers responded to an hit and run at the intersection of Northport Drive and N. Sherman Ave. Witnesses observed a 7 year & #8230;


Microsoft confirms talks seeking to buy US arm of TikTok

NEW YORK (AP) — Microsoft confirmed Sunday it is in talks with Chinese company ByteDance to acquire the U.S. arm of its popular video app TikTok and has discussed with President Donald Trump his concerns about security and censorship surrounding such an acquisition.

In a statement, Microsoft said Microsoft and ByteDance have provided notice of their intent to explore a deal resulting in Microsoft owning and operating the TikTok service in the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The company said it expects those talks to conclude by Sept. 15.

Trump said on Friday that he would soon ban TikTok in the United States. Trump and CEO Satya Nadella have spoken, the company said, and Microsoft was prepared to continue exploring the purchase of TikTok’s U.S. operations after their conversation.

“Microsoft fully appreciates the importance of addressing the President’s concerns. It is committed to acquiring TikTok subject to a complete security review and providing proper economic benefits to the United States, including the United States Treasury,” the Microsoft statement said.

The White House did not immediately comment on the Microsoft statement.

Previously, there were reports that Microsoft was in advanced talks to buy the U.S. operations of TikTok, which has been a source of national security and censorship concerns for the Trump administration. Earlier Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo again raised the administration’s warnings about social media platform.

“These Chinese software companies doing business in the United States, whether it’s TikTok or WeChat — there are countless more … are feeding data directly to the Chinese Communist Party, their national security apparatus,” Pompeo said on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures.”

“Could be their facial recognition patterns. It could be information about their residence, their phone numbers, their friends, who they’re connected to. Those — those are the issues that President Trump has made clear we’re going to take care of,” Pompeo said.

In its statement, Microsoft said it may invite other American investors to participate on a minority basis in the purchase of TikTok. Financial terms were undisclosed.

TikTok’s U.S. user data is stored in the U.S., with strict controls on employee access, and its biggest investors come from the U.S., the company said earlier Sunday. “We are committed to protecting our users’ privacy and safety as we continue working to bring joy to families and meaningful careers to those who create on our platform,” a TikTok spokesperson said.

A federal committee has been reviewing whether Trump could ban TikTok in the U.S. Its members agree that TikTok cannot remain in the U.S. in its current form because it “risks sending back information on 100 million Americans,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said.

“We all agree there has to be a change … everybody agrees it can’t exist as it does,” Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.”

As speculation grew over a ban or sale of the social media platform’s U.S. business, TikTok posted a video on Saturday saying, “We’re not planning on going anywhere.”

TikTok’s catchy videos and ease of use has made it popular, and it says it has tens of millions of users in the U.S. and hundreds of millions globally. Its parent company, Bytedance Ltd., launched TikTok in 2017. It bought Musical.ly, a video service popular with teens in the U.S. and Europe, and combined the two. It has a similar service, Douyin, for users in China.

But TikTok’s Chinese ownership has raised concern about the potential for sharing user data with Chinese officials as well as censorship of videos critical of the Chinese government. TikTok says it does not censor videos and it would not give the Chinese government access to U.S. user data.

“The President, when he makes his decision, will make sure that everything we have done drives us as close to zero risk for the American people,” Pompeo said. “That’s the mission set that he laid out for all of us when we get — we began to evaluate this now several months back. We’re closing in on a solution. And I think you will see the president’s announcement shortly.”

The debate over TikTok parallels a broader U.S. security crackdown on Chinese companies, including telecom providers Huawei and ZTE. The Trump administration has ordered that the U.S. stop buying equipment from those providers to be used in U.S. networks. Trump has also tried to steer allies away from Huawei over concerns that the Chinese government has access to its data, which Huawei denies.


Trash Pandas hosting school supply drive

MADISON, Ala. – The Rocket City Trash Pandas encourage the community to donate to its school supply drive starting Monday.

People can drop off supplies at The Junkyard team store at Toyota Field all this week.

Supplies collected will be donated to local educational organizations, the team tweeted Sunday.


Weapons Violation

1700 Block of Ellen Ave
City of Madison Police officers were dispatched to the 1700 block of Ellen Avenue reference reports of five to six shots being fired, with a silver & #8230;


Hong Kong barristers have ‘serious doubts’ over legality of postponing Legislative Council elections

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Georgia teen loses both parents to COVID-19 days apart

A community in the Atlanta area is rallying around a teenager who lost both of his parents to COVID-19 just days apart, WSB reports.

“We were a regular family just trying to stay safe during this pandemic,” said 17-year-old Justin Hunter. 

The high school senior says he and his parents, Angie and Eugene, took all the proper precautions. 

“For example, my mom. When she would go to the store she would be wearing a mask. She would be wearing gloves,” Justin said. 

But about two weeks ago, they all became infected with COVID-19. 

“I don’t really know how our family got the virus,” Justin said. 

He says he was asymptomatic, but his parents started showing serious symptoms. 

“Their temperature, it skyrocketed. They had headaches. Horrible cough. They just felt very lazy,” Justin said. 

His parents were rushed to the hospital. 

His father, an accomplished musician, lost his battle with the virus on July 26. 

His mother, a human resources executive, died four days later. 

“The last thing he said was ‘I love you,’ and I’m going to get better, and I’m going to keep fighting,” Justin said. “They never raised me to just sit around and feel sorry for myself in any situation.”

He says his strength comes from his two biggest role models who shared an incredible marriage for 35 years and had been his number one fans since he started playing football as a young child. 

“Their relationship was true love for sure. They had very big hearts, and they would give without even thinking about getting back,” Justin said. 

Donations continue to pour in for the family. 

“It feels really good to know that I’ve got people that have my back,” Justin said. 

He has this message for anyone who isn’t taking the pandemic seriously: “If you don’t wear it for yourself, wear it for the next person cause you could be saving that person’s life.”

A GoFundMe has been set up for Hunter with over $100,000 raised so far.


Possible COVID-19 transmission through Turtleford Co-op, says Saskatchewan Health Authority

There's a possibility the novel coronavirus was transmitted through a local business in Turtleford, say health officials, who are asking those who visited the store on or after July 28 to self-monitor for symptoms.


Tracking the Tropics: Isaias slightly strengthens as it crawls up east coast

VERO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Bands of heavy rain from Isaias lashed Florida’s east coast Sunday, with the tropical storm strengthening slightly in the evening on its way up the Eastern seabord.

Officials dealing with surging cases of the coronavirus in Florida kept a close watch on the storm that was weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm Saturday afternoon, but still brought heavy rain and flooding to Florida’s Atlantic coast.

The National Hurricane Center advised at 5 p.m. EDT Sunday that the storm was about 65 miles (105 kilometers) off the east coast of Central Florida, and about 410 miles (660 kilometers) south of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

It was strengthening slightly with sustained winds just under a Category 1 hurricane, taking a north-northwest path, according to the center.

“Don’t be fooled by the downgrade,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis warned at a news conference after the storm — pronounced ees-ah-EE-ahs — spent hours roughing up the Bahamas.

Upper-level winds took much of the strength out of Isaias, said Stacy Stewart, senior hurricane specialist at the hurricane center in Miami.

“We were expecting a hurricane to develop and it didn’t,” Stewart said Sunday. “It’s a tale of two storms. If you live on the west side of the storm, you didn’t get much. If you live east of the storm, there’s a lot of nasty weather there.”

Authorities closed beaches, parks and virus testing sites, lashing signs to palm trees so they wouldn’t blow away. DeSantis said the state is anticipating power outages and asked residents to have a week’s supply of water, food and medicine on hand. Officials wrestled with how to prepare shelters where people can seek refuge from the storm if necessary, while also safely social distancing to prevent the spread of the virus.

In Palm Beach County, about 150 people were in shelters, said emergency management spokeswoman Lisa De La Rionda. The county has a voluntary evacuation order for those living in mobile or manufactured homes, or those who feel their home can’t withstand winds.

“We don’t anticipate many more evacuations,” she said, adding that the evacuees are physically distant from each other and are wearing masks, due to the virus.

In Indian River County, north of West Palm Beach, Florida, emergency shelters were clearing out Sunday after Isaias was downgraded to a tropical storm.

Officials told TCPalm newspapers that 38 people registered at three schools used as shelters. Those areas now must be cleaned to ensure no traces of the coronavirus remain as teachers and staff report Monday to prepare for the upcoming school year.

No one checked in with COVID-19 symptoms. Temperature checks were done at the door, officials said, and isolation rooms were designated in case anyone came in with symptoms.

The storm’s maximum sustained winds declined steadily throughout Saturday, and were at 65 mph (100 kph) at 2 p.m. ET Sunday, before crawling back up to 70 mph a few hours later, the hurricane center said.

“The center of Isaias will move offshore of the coast of Georgia and southern South Carolina on Monday, move inland over eastern North Carolina Monday night and move along the coast of the mid-Atlantic states on Tuesday,” according to the hurricane center.

A Tropical Storm Watch has been extended northward to Watch Hill, Rhode Island, including the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, Long Island and Long Island Sound.

The storm did not affect the successful return of two astronauts aboard the SpaceX Dragon capsule, which splashed down into calm waters in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Pensacola. Test pilots Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken rode the capsule back to Earth less than a day after departing the International Space Station and two months after blasting off from Florida.

Isaias already has caused destruction in the Caribbean: On Thursday, before it became a hurricane, it uprooted trees, destroyed crops and homes and caused widespread flooding and small landslides in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. One man died in the Dominican Republic. In Puerto Rico, the National Guard rescued at least 35 people from floods that swept away one woman, whose body was recovered Saturday.

Isaias snapped trees and knocked out power as it blew through the Bahamas on Saturday.

With coronavirus cases surging in Florida recently, the added menace of a storm ratcheted up the anxiety. State-run virus testing sites closed in areas where the storm might hit because the sites are outdoor tents, which could topple in high winds.

Natalie Betancur, stocking up at a grocery in Palm Beach Gardens, said that the storm itself doesn’t cause her a great amount of concern.

“The hurricane is not that serious, but I feel that the public is really panicking because it’s a hurricane and we’re in the middle of a pandemic,” she said.

Officials in the Bahamas opened shelters for people in Abaco island to help those who have been living in temporary structures since Dorian devastated the area, killing at least 70 people in September 2019.


Evacuations of several homes ordered as ‘dangerous’ wildfire sparks in Colusa County

Evacuations have been ordered Sunday afternoon for a wildfire in Colusa County with a “dangerous rate of spread.” The Sites Fire started just after 4 p.m. near Sites Lodoga and … Click to Continue »


Accident – Newton Bridge Rd at Kathwood Dr. Newton bridge blocked until cleared.

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Regina councillors to consider body rub establishment regulations Wednesday

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Grim times: without jobs, some in Hong Kong tighten belts and deplete savings as they face an uncertain future

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Kosovo prime minister says he has tested positive for coronavirus

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Is That Business or Rental Address Real? Be Sure to Check It Twice!

For years, BBB has warned consumers against doing business with callers and online companies who don’t have a valid physical address. Scammers, never easily deterred, have found a way to associate an address with their shady dealings, and this has led to the birth of even more scams.

Homeowners with multiple properties, consumers, and renters need to be aware of several scams that start with the address of a house, apartment, or property that is currently unoccupied.

Businesses Using Fake Addresses

Scammers will try to sell all kinds of counterfeit or non-existent products online. Common scams involve the sale of high-dollar large items, such as RVs and cars, puppies, and brand name clothing, usually at steeply discounted (too-good-to-be-true) prices. They often use images they’ve harvested from legitimate websites to convince consumers the products exist.

To give their scheme a more reputable appearance, scammers are now adding a physical address to their websites or online product listings. Where do they get the address? They find a vacant property and simply add it to their listing. A quick web search may reveal that the “business address” is located in a residential area, a vacant place of business, or the same address as a real, but unrelated business. 

Phony Rental Scams

Scam reports indicate that many con artists steal online rental listings – including the photos of the house or apartment and the property description – and create their own listings, which look legitimate but contain the scammer’s contact information instead of the property owner’s or rental agent’s. They may work out a deal with you over the phone, insisting that because of an emergency or circumstances outside of their control, they won’t be able to meet you in person or show you the property. Instead, they may invite you to drive by and send you a contract by mail or email.

Once you’ve signed the contract, they ask for your deposit and first month’s rent. In return, they will mail you the keys to the property. Your check or wired funds will be received, but no key will ever be sent in return, and the scammers will vanish into thin air.

Scammers are also using vacant addresses for even more sinister purposes. Some scammers look for vacant homes that don’t seem well-cared for – a “For Sale” sign, lack of an alarm system, and an unkempt lawn may be all it takes. After identifying a target, they actually break into the home, set up their own rental listing and give tours to potential renters. In a few cases, renters have lived in a home and paid a false landlord for months before the truth comes to light.

How to Avoid Vacant House Scams

Tips for owners of unoccupied houses:

  • Secure all windows and doors to your vacant property. It may seem obvious, but door and window locks can get overlooked – especially if you’re busy with the hustle and bustle of a move. Keep intruders out by double checking the locks before you leave the property.
  • Maintain your property. A lawn and house that looks cared for will discourage scammers from targeting your property. If you live far away, hire a reputable lawn care company to come at regular intervals, set up automatic sprinklers, and keep the contact information for a trustworthy local handyman nearby.
  • Give an extra key to a friend or neighbor. Ask them to check up on your home periodically. This is also important in case someone needs to give a handyman or the police access to your property and much safer than a lockbox.
  • Keep your alarm system up and running. This will be a huge protection for your unoccupied home. If you can’t afford the expense of an alarm system, it doesn’t hurt to keep an alarm system sign posted in the front yard. You could also consider installing a surveillance doorbell that can show you who has been on the premises, in real time.
  • Put a hold on the mail. A mailbox overflowing with junk mail is a tell-tale sign no one is home and could attract scammers, thieves, and other suspicious individuals. It’s best to have your mail forwarded to your new address or a P.O. box.
  • Consider purchasing vacant home insurance. Most vacant home insurance plans cover acts of vandalism, fires, and weather-related damage. Ask your home insurance provider about getting coverage.
  • Notice the warning signs. If you start receiving messages or mail directed to your vacant property with someone else’s name, or complaints regarding rental agreements or sales you did not make, it’s time to investigate the matter further.

Tips for renters:

  • Confirm the identity of the landlord. A legitimate landlord won’t hesitate to show you their ID and will allow you to take a picture. You should be able to confirm they are the real property owner by checking county registers.
  • Know local rental prices. If someone offers you a great rental for an extremely low price, proceed with caution.
  • See the property first. Never sign a lease or make a deposit without seeing the property in person first.
  • Never wire money to a stranger. Don’t give in to a sob story. If you wire money to a stranger and they don’t keep up their end of the deal, you’ll have no way to get your money back. Legitimate landlords should always accept payment by check.
  • Watch out for red flags. If a property has a “for sale” sign, but the “landlord” wants to rent, something is up. It’s also suspicious if you arrive to a property and find a broken lockbox.
  • Use the services of a reputable rental agency. This will give you an added layer of protection as you carry out your search.

Tips for consumers:

  • Look out for too-good-to-be-true deals. Know the normal price range of the item you want to purchase and be wary if you see the same product available at a steeply discounted price.
  • Double check the “business address.” If a website you aren’t familiar with has a business address, take a few moments to search the address. If the address pops up on a map as a residential address or at a vacant property, you’re probably not dealing with a legitimate business.
  • Make purchases through a reputable online retailer. Double check business ratings at BBB.org and read through customer reviews before you decide to do business with an online retailer.

For More Information

For more information, see this BBB Study on Rental Scams and the BBB Tip: Smart Shopping Online.

Scammers tactics are continually changing and evolving. If you’ve been the victim of one or know of someone who has, report it on the BBB.org/ScamTracker. Your report can help others to avoid falling prey to similar scam tactics.

Sign up for BBB Scam Alerts.

Read more about BBB Accreditation Standards and BBB Standards for Trust

Learn how to become a BBB Accredited Business.

Source: BBB.org


BBB Alert: Mysterious Seeds from China Possibly a Brushing Scam and Maybe More!

People around the country are receiving mysterious seed packets in the mail from China. While the shipping package may be mislabeled as jewelry or other merchandise, the contents are instead unlabeled seeds.

In a scam known as “Brushing,” businesses will send their merchandise to your home in order to post a fake, positive review on their products. But why go through the trouble of mailing you merchandise instead of just posting the fake review?

“Often, retailers require reviewers to have actually bought the product. You can’t review something if you haven’t bought it. So, these shady businesses have to make it look like their fake reviews come from legitimate people,” said Rupp. “Because big retailers like Amazon verify and track addresses and packages through a third party like USPS, scammers can’t send packages to bogus places.”

Instead, scammers go online, find real addresses of real people, and create fake accounts. They then mail these unsuspecting people an actual product—or something completely unrelated to what they’re selling. After the tracking system confirms delivery, these scammers can then leave a “verified” review in your name. Not only do they have one more stellar review, they have also falsely inflated their sales to look more successful than they are.

In any case, receiving one of these packages is bad news for you:

The fact that the items were sent to you as if you purchased them indicates scammers have some of your information and may have also created an account in your name. Certainly, they have your name and address, and possibly, your phone number and a password. Once the information is out there, it could be used for numerous crooked enterprises.

The fake online review angle is only one way they benefit. By using the brushing scam, they also are increasing their sales numbers. After all, they aren’t really purchasing the items, since the payment goes right back to them. Increased sales numbers, even though padded with fake purchases, look good for the company and help lead to more sales.

What should you do if you receive mysterious seeds from China?

  • Contact your state’s branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Seeds can sometimes be invasive species, contain pests or pathogens, and their importation is usually highly regulated by the government. Do not plant them to see what grows or throw them away. Please file a report with the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) at www.agi.alabama.gov/reportseeds and provide the requested information. At the end of the on-line form, consumers will be given directions on how to store the seeds properly until contacted by ADAI. For more information, contact ADAI’s Ag Compliance section at 334-240-7304.
  • Notify the retailer. Look up the company who sent you the seeds. If you can find a listing on a 3rd party retailer, contact that company’s customer service and report the brushing scam.
  • Check your information. The package may be a sign that your personal information has been compromised.
    • Change your password.
    • Keep a close eye on your credit report, bank accounts and credit card bills. Under the Fair & Accurate Credit Transaction Act, consumers are entitled to one free annual credit report from each of the credit bureaus. The only authorized source: AnnualCreditReport.com (1-877-322-8228).
    • By looking up your name and address using a search engine, you can in some cases see how public your information has become.
    • If you find unauthorized activity on other accounts, contact the three Credit Reporting Agencies to place either a Fraud Alert or Freeze on all credit accounts.
      • Experian: https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html
      • Transunion: https://freeze.transunion.com
      • Equifax: https://www.freeze.equifax.com

Scammers tactics are continually changing and evolving. If you’ve been the victim of one or know of someone who has, report it on the BBB.org/ScamTracker. Your report can help others to avoid falling prey to similar scam tactics.

Read more about BBB Accreditation Standards and BBB Standards for Trust

Learn how to become a BBB Accredited Business.

Source: BBB North Alabama, BBB Serving Northern Nevada and Utah, BBB.org


WATCH THURSDAY: “COVID & the Classroom: Coping with the Struggle”

TENNESSEE VALLEY, Ala. – Nineteen weeks have passed since the Tennessee Valley’s students last attended school. In those weeks, parents, guardians, teachers and school staff have been inundated with a dizzying amount of options, procedures and guidance on how to best manage education during the pandemic.

As districts get ready to start the 2020-21 school year, WHNT News 19 will provide an in-depth look at what it means to return to the classroom, whether physically or virtually. This 30-minute special will also feature insight from school leaders and students, along with coping strategies to deal with this overwhelming time.

Please join us Thursday, August 6 at 6:30 p.m. for “COVID & the Classroom: Coping with the Struggle.”


Saskatchewan government tells ‘Walking With Our Angels’ protest camp to leave Wascana Park

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Florence man describes son’s encounter with shark off coast of Orange Beach

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. (WKRG) – The dad of a teenager who was bitten by a shark in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday shared his experience on social media.

The following images may be graphic for some viewers:

Chilly Chilton posted Friday night about his son’s encounter with a shark off the coast of Orange Beach. In the post, he says he saw a 4-5 foot shark after his son received the bite.

“Then, almost suddenly, the waves began to be filled with large 2-3 foot long fish, hundreds of them surrounded us with each wave hitting the sandbar. It felt weird to us, so we all agreed to get off the sandbar and head back to the beach (80-100 yards). Max led the way and immediately as he swam off the sandbar he let out a panic scream and his face was filled with terror — he said, “something bite by foot” — without thinking I stepped right behind him and as I looked back saw the very thing you never want to see… it was a large shark (large to me, at least 4-5 feet). it was there and then it wasn’t… Max knew he was injured and bleeding — so, I lied to him — “it wasn’t a shark and you’re not bleeding — let’s just get to shore and we’ll evaluate,” the teenager’s dad posted on Facebook after the encounter.

The victim, 15-year-old Maximus Chilton, is visiting Orange Beach with his family on vacation from Florence, Alabama. The family told WKRG News 5 hospital staff confirmed the bite marks appeared to be from a shark.

WKRG News 5 first reported the incident Friday afternoon and since then learned the teenager received stitches for injuries after being treated at South Baldwin Regional Medical Center. The family was swimming near the sandbar in front of Phoenix IV condominiums.

More on the story here.

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Debate begins for who’s first in line for COVID-19 vaccine

Who gets to be first in line for a COVID-19 vaccine? U.S. health authorities hope by late next month to have some draft guidance on how to ration initial doses, but it’s a vexing decision.

“Not everybody’s going to like the answer,” Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, recently told one of the advisory groups the government asked to help decide. “There will be many people who feel that they should have been at the top of the list.”

Traditionally, first in line for a scarce vaccine are health workers and the people most vulnerable to the targeted infection.

But Collins tossed new ideas into the mix: Consider geography and give priority to people where an outbreak is hitting hardest.

And don’t forget volunteers in the final stage of vaccine testing who get dummy shots, the comparison group needed to tell if the real shots truly work.

“We owe them … some special priority,” Collins said.

Huge studies this summer aim to prove which of several experimental COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Moderna Inc. and Pfizer Inc. began tests last week that eventually will include 30,000 volunteers each; in the next few months, equally large calls for volunteers will go out to test shots made by AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson and Novavax. And some vaccines made in China are in smaller late-stage studies in other countries.

For all the promises of the U.S. stockpiling millions of doses, the hard truth: Even if a vaccine is declared safe and effective by year’s end, there won’t be enough for everyone who wants it right away — especially as most potential vaccines require two doses.

It’s a global dilemma. The World Health Organization is grappling with the same who-goes-first question as it tries to ensure vaccines are fairly distributed to poor countries — decisions made even harder as wealthy nations corner the market for the first doses.

In the U.S., the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a group established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is supposed to recommend who to vaccinate and when — advice that the government almost always follows.

But a COVID-19 vaccine decision is so tricky that this time around, ethicists and vaccine experts from the National Academy of Medicine, chartered by Congress to advise the government, are being asked to weigh in, too.

Setting priorities will require “creative, moral common sense,” said Bill Foege, who devised the vaccination strategy that led to global eradication of smallpox. Foege is co-leading the academy’s deliberations, calling it “both this opportunity and this burden.”

With vaccine misinformation abounding and fears that politics might intrude, CDC Director Robert Redfield said the public must see vaccine allocation as “equitable, fair and transparent.”

How to decide? The CDC’s opening suggestion: First vaccinate 12 million of the most critical health, national security and other essential workers. Next would be 110 million people at high risk from the coronavirus — those over 65 who live in long-term care facilities, or those of any age who are in poor health — or who also are deemed essential workers. The general population would come later.

CDC’s vaccine advisers wanted to know who’s really essential. “I wouldn’t consider myself a critical health care worker,” admitted Dr. Peter Szilagyi, a pediatrician at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Indeed, the risks for health workers today are far different than in the pandemic’s early days. Now, health workers in COVID-19 treatment units often are the best protected; others may be more at risk, committee members noted.

Beyond the health and security fields, does “essential” mean poultry plant workers or schoolteachers? And what if the vaccine doesn’t work as well among vulnerable populations as among younger, healthier people? It’s a real worry, given that older people’s immune systems don’t rev up as well to flu vaccine.

With Black, Latino and Native American populations disproportionately hit by the coronavirus, failing to address that diversity means “whatever comes out of our group will be looked at very suspiciously,” said ACIP chairman Dr. Jose Romero, Arkansas’ interim health secretary.

Consider the urban poor who live in crowded conditions, have less access to health care and can’t work from home like more privileged Americans, added Dr. Sharon Frey of St. Louis University.

And it may be worth vaccinating entire families rather than trying to single out just one high-risk person in a household, said Dr. Henry Bernstein of Northwell Health.

Whoever gets to go first, a mass vaccination campaign while people are supposed to be keeping their distance is a tall order. During the 2009 swine flu pandemic, families waited in long lines in parking lots and at health departments when their turn came up, crowding that authorities know they must avoid this time around.

Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration’s effort to speed vaccine manufacturing and distribution, is working out how to rapidly transport the right number of doses to wherever vaccinations are set to occur.

Drive-through vaccinations, pop-up clinics and other innovative ideas are all on the table, said CDC’s Dr. Nancy Messonnier.

As soon as a vaccine is declared effective, “we want to be able the next day, frankly, to start these programs,” Messonnier said. “It’s a long road.”

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Subscribe to bi-weekly newsletter to get health news sent straight to your inbox.


OPP identify man, 25, who died after cliff-diving into river southeast of Sudbury

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Oakwood University reopens campus and preps to start fall term

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – After shutting its doors early due to the pandemic, Oakwood University administrators began reopening campus over the weekend.

The university rolled out a hybrid learning plan for the fall term, similar to what public schools around North Alabama have done.

Students will soon migrate back to campus. Some of them will take classes with a combination of remote and in-person learning. Others may learn 100 percent virtually. Oakwood President Leslie Pollard said it just depends on the class.

“We’ve got a team of people who worked literally thousands of hours in planning for students who wish to return to campus,” Pollard said.

When they arrive, there will be health guidelines to follow. Pollard said students are required to wear a face-covering and will be spaced out in classrooms. And as weather permits, Pollard said some students may get to learn outdoors instead.

“When you think about campus life, it’ll be very different,” Pollard said.

But he said he’s counting on the students to consider their own health as well as others.

“We’re going to have to call upon their own maturity to assist us in keeping the campus safe,” Pollard said.

Oakwood University said it will continue to follow health guidelines from the CDC.


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Alabama State Troopers said Michael Howard Hubka, 68, was struck by a vehicle at 10 a.m. on U.S. 43 at the intersection of Blue Road, just north of Littleville. Hubka was pronounced dead at the scene.

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The Trump administration's move to ban the popular app over cyber security concerns has since raised the same question for their neighbours north of the border.


State Police Investigating Fatal Crash in Milton

At approximately 12:15 a.m. today Troopers assigned to State Police-Milton responded to reports of a crash involving a car and a motorcycle in the area of 330 Truman Parkway in Milton. Upon their arrival they located the operator of the motorcycle, a 27-year-old man from Milton, on the roadway suffering from serious injuries. Preliminary investigation…


Tropical storm Isaias to hit Eastern Canada by middle of next week

Tropical storm Isaias could bring “heavy rainfall and gusty winds” to the Maritimes, as it climbs the continent's eastern shore.


Criticism at English-only version of O Canada

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Coronavirus: Montreal bars ensuring safety as sports resume this summer

Sports bars are still following the guidelines from health officials to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.


California judge denies bail for researcher over China ties

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Super League: Huddersfield Giants 26-27 Leeds Rhinos

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OSP Requesting Information from Witnesses/Victims of Crashes/Reckless Driving – Coos/Douglas/Lane Counties (Photo)

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at approximately 10:37 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers were dispatched to a reckless driver and hit and run crash located on Hwy 101 milepost 233 just north of North Bend, OR.

The reporting person advised they were stopped at the traffic signal at East Bay Dr. and Hwy 101 when they were struck  from behind. The suspect vehicle, a green older Dodge 1500 pickup with a green canopy bearing CA license plate, then accelerated attempting to push the vehicle into the intersection.

None of the occupants were injured and the Dodge continued northbound on Hwy 101 driving recklessly.

OSP was notified by the Coos Bay Police Department they were investigating the same Dodge pickup for striking several vehicles while traveling north on Hwy 101 through the city of Coos Bay. 

OSP received a report the Dodge was observed at the trailhead to Siltcoos Lake, near the city of Florence, where the vehicle had intentionally struck several more vehicles and was again observed driving recklessly.

One occupant from a struck vehicle was injured and transported by West Lane Ambulance to Florence Hospital.

Oregon State Police Troopers responded to the area and located Kevin Simpson (47) of Eureka CA. on Hwy 101 near milepost 196. He was lodged a the Lane County Jail for failure to perform the duties of a driver (hit and run), reckless endangerment, reckless driving, and criminal mischief.     

The Dodge was located nearby and had crashed through a gate leading to private property and become stuck in the sand.  The Dodge was reported stolen out of Eureka, CA.

Oregon State Police is requesting information from witnesses to the reckless driving and crashes or victims of crashes to contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 541-269-5000 or *OSP and leave information for Trooper Douglas Laird. 

Simpson stated that he believed he had struck 26 different vehicles.


Saskatchewan reports 8 new cases of coronavirus as testing hits a new high

Hospitalizations as a result of COVID-19 hit a new daily high in Saskatchewan on Sunday. 


Environment Canada warning of strong storms, possible tornadoes in central, eastern Ontario

The federal weather agency placed many municipalities under various warnings and watches on Sunday afternoon. The storms could last until the evening, Environment Canada said.


Bresnan hits Bears ton in Bob Willis Trophy – day two round-up

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Arrest Made in a Homicide: 3400 Block of 22nd Street, Southeast

Sunday, August 2, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department’s Homicide Branch announced an arrest has been made in a homicide that occurred on Friday, April 3, 2020, in the 3400 block of 22nd Street, Southeast.

At approximately 6:50 pm, members of the Seventh District responded to the listed location for the report of a shooting. Upon arrival, officers located an adult male suffering from a gunshot wound. DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene and transported the victim to a local hospital for treatment. After all life-saving efforts failed, the victim was pronounced dead. Additionally, officers located a juvenile male victim receiving treatment at another local hospital for a non-life threatening gunshot wound.

The decedent has been identified as 28 year-old David Deandre Young, of Clinton, MD.

On Sunday, August 2, 2020, pursuant to a DC Superior Court arrest warrant, 20 year-old Wesley Scott, of Southeast, DC was arrested and charged with First Degree Murder While Armed.

This case remains under investigation.

The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up to $25,000 to anyone that provides information which leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for any homicide committed in the District of Columbia. Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the police at 202-727-9099. Additionally, anonymous information may be submitted to the department’s TEXT TIP LINE by sending a text message to 50411.


Los Angeles protesters demand rent cancellation amid virus

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London, Ont., family raises funds for daughter, 13, awaiting kidney transplant

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Coronavirus: Major incident declared in Greater Manchester

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Derby Barracks/ MV Crash

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH   CASE#: 20A502976                                      RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Ian Alford STATION: Derby Barracks                                         CONTACT#: 802-334-8881 DATE/TIME: 08/02/20 0652 hours STREET: VT RT 102 TOWN: Bloomsfield LANDMARK AND/OR CROSS


Hunt goes on for mom who vanished on pandemic ‘road trip’ to California national park

As the coronavirus pandemic dragged on, Erika Lloyd was feeling the strain. “Being (in) lockdown for almost three months, not being able to work, and she was trying to home-school … Click to Continue »


Woman arrested in fight over social distancing at Colorado Springs Walmart

COLORADO SPRINGS — An argument over COVID-19 social distancing led to a fistfight in a Colorado Springs Walmart between two women on Friday, police said.

One of the women complained that the other was not staying 6 feet away, according to Colorado Springs police. An argument ensued and the first woman threw the other to the floor inside the store, police said.

The woman, whose name was not released, was arrested on suspicion of third-degree assault, The Gazette reported.

Health experts recommend people try to stay at least 6 feet away from each other to slow the spread of the coronavirus.


Wildfire near Grand Junction grows to 1,020 acres in steep, rough terrain

A wildfire near Grand Junction grew to 1,020 acres Sunday as crews struggled to fight the blaze in steep, rough terrain.

The Pine Gulch fire was started by lightning Friday evening and is burning about 19 miles north of Grand Junction, largely on Bureau of Land Management land, although it did reach private property Sunday. The flames have not destroyed or threatened any structures.

About 86 people were working to contain the fire Sunday, and another 60 personnel have been requested to bolster the effort, along with additional equipment, said Maribeth Pecotte, the Bureau of Land Management’s public information officer for this fire.

The fire is being fed by dense, dry vegetation, as well as ongoing drought conditions in Mesa County. Sunday afternoon thunderstorms aren’t expected to drop any rain on the area, but could bring gusty winds that spread the fire further, Pecotte said.

Three helicopter crews are working the fire and a tanker has been requested, Pecotte said.

“They’re calling it a fuel-driven fire,” she said. “There are continuous fuels on that north side of the ridge that it is burning on … it started on the south side of the ridge there, and some fingers of it started creeping over and downslope to the north into that heavy, continuous fuel.”


Wildfire map

Click markers for details, use buttons to change what wildfires are shown. Map data is automatically updated by government agencies and could lag real-time events. Incident types are numbered 1-5 — a type 1 incident is a large, complex wildfire affecting people and critical infrastructure, a type 5 incident is a small wildfire with few personnel involved. Find more information about incident types at the bottom of this page.


SpaceX capsule and NASA crew make 1st splashdown in 45 years

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Two NASA astronauts returned to Earth on Sunday in a dramatic, retro-style splashdown, their capsule parachuting into the Gulf of Mexico to close out an unprecedented test flight by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company.

It was the first splashdown by U.S. astronauts in 45 years, with the first commercially built and operated spacecraft to carry people to and from orbit. The return clears the way for another SpaceX crew launch as early as next month and possible tourist flights next year.

Test pilots Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken rode the SpaceX Dragon capsule back to Earth less than a day after departing the International Space Station and two months after blasting off from Florida. The capsule parachuted into the calm gulf waters off the coast of Pensacola, hundreds of miles from Tropical Storm Isaias pounding Florida’s Atlantic coast.

“Welcome back to planet Earth and thanks for flying SpaceX,” the company’s Mission Control said.

The astronauts’ ride home in the capsule dubbed Endeavour was fast, bumpy and hot, at least on the outside.

The spacecraft went from a screaming orbital speed of 17,500 mph (28,000 kph) to 350 mph (560 kph) during atmospheric reentry, and finally to 15 mph (24 kph) at splashdown. Peak heating during descent was 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,900 degrees Celsius). The anticipated top G forces felt by the crew: four to five times the force of Earth’s gravity.

A SpaceX recovery ship with more than 40 staff, including doctors and nurses, moved in following splashdown, with two smaller, faster boats leading the way. To keep the returning astronauts safe in the pandemic, the recovery crew quarantined for two weeks and were tested for the coronavirus.

SpaceX expected it to take a half-hour for the ship to arrive at the capsule and additional time to lift it out of the water onto the deck. The astronauts had plenty of seasick bags if needed while waiting in the bobbing capsule. A flight surgeon was going to be the first to look into the capsule, once the hatch swung open. After medical exams, the astronauts were expected to fly home to Houston for a reunion with their wives and sons.

The last time NASA astronauts returned from space to water was on July 24, 1975, in the Pacific, the scene of most splashdowns, to end a joint U.S.-Soviet mission known as Apollo-Soyuz. The Mercury and Gemini crews in the early to mid-1960s parachuted into the Atlantic, while most of the later Apollo capsules hit the Pacific. The lone Russian “splashdown” was in 1976 on a partially frozen lake amid a blizzard following an aborted mission; the harrowing recovery took hours.

SpaceX made history with this mission, which launched May 30 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. It was the first time a private company launched people into orbit and also the first launch of NASA astronauts from home turf in nearly a decade. Hurley came full circle, serving as pilot of NASA’s last space shuttle flight in 2011 and the commander of this SpaceX flight.

Musk monitored the descent and splashdown from SpaceX Mission Control in Hawthorne, California.

NASA turned to SpaceX and also Boeing to build capsules and ferry astronauts to and from the space station, following the retirement of the shuttles. Until Hurley and Behnken rocketed into orbit, NASA astronauts relied on Russian rockets. SpaceX already had experience hauling cargo to the space station, bringing those capsules back to a Pacific splashdown.

“This is the next era in human spaceflight where NASA gets to be the customer,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said from Johnson Space Center in Houston shortly before the astronauts’ return.

SpaceX needs six weeks to inspect the capsule before launching the next crew around the end of September. This next mission of four astronauts will spend a full six months aboard the space station. Hurley and Behnken’s capsule will be refurbished for another flight next spring. A Houston company run by a former NASA official, meanwhile, has partnered with SpaceX to send three customers to the space station in fall 2021.

Boeing doesn’t expect to launch its first crew until next year. The company encountered significant software problems in the debut of its Starliner capsule, with no one aboard, last year. Its capsules will touch down in the U.S. Southwest desert.

By beating Boeing, SpaceX laid claim to a small U.S. flag left at the space station by Hurley and the rest of the last shuttle crew. The flag — which also flew on the first shuttle flight — was carefully packed aboard the Dragon for the homecoming.

Also on board: a toy dinosaur named Tremor, sent into space by the astronauts’ young sons.

The boys recorded a wake-up call for their fathers Sunday morning, urging them to “rise and shine” and “we can’t wait to see you.”

“Don’t worry, you can sleep in tomorrow,” said Behnken’s 6-year-old son Theo, who was promised a puppy after the flight. “Hurry home so we can go get my dog.”


SpaceX capsule and NASA crew make 1st splashdown in 45 years

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Two NASA astronauts returned to Earth on Sunday in a dramatic, retro-style splashdown, their capsule parachuting into the Gulf of Mexico to close out an unprecedented test flight by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company.

It was the first splashdown by U.S. astronauts in 45 years, with the first commercially built and operated spacecraft to carry people to and from orbit. The return clears the way for another SpaceX crew launch as early as next month and possible tourist flights next year.

Test pilots Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken rode the SpaceX Dragon capsule back to Earth less than a day after departing the International Space Station and two months after blasting off from Florida. The capsule parachuted into the calm gulf waters off the coast of Pensacola, hundreds of miles from Tropical Storm Isaias pounding Florida’s Atlantic coast.

“Welcome back to planet Earth and thanks for flying SpaceX,” the company’s Mission Control said.

The astronauts’ ride home in the capsule dubbed Endeavour was fast, bumpy and hot, at least on the outside.

The spacecraft went from a screaming orbital speed of 17,500 mph (28,000 kph) to 350 mph (560 kph) during atmospheric reentry, and finally to 15 mph (24 kph) at splashdown. Peak heating during descent was 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,900 degrees Celsius). The anticipated top G forces felt by the crew: four to five times the force of Earth’s gravity.

A SpaceX recovery ship with more than 40 staff, including doctors and nurses, moved in following splashdown, with two smaller, faster boats leading the way. To keep the returning astronauts safe in the pandemic, the recovery crew quarantined for two weeks and were tested for the coronavirus.

SpaceX expected it to take a half-hour for the ship to arrive at the capsule and additional time to lift it out of the water onto the deck. The astronauts had plenty of seasick bags if needed while waiting in the bobbing capsule. A flight surgeon was going to be the first to look into the capsule, once the hatch swung open. After medical exams, the astronauts were expected to fly home to Houston for a reunion with their wives and sons.

The last time NASA astronauts returned from space to water was on July 24, 1975, in the Pacific, the scene of most splashdowns, to end a joint U.S.-Soviet mission known as Apollo-Soyuz. The Mercury and Gemini crews in the early to mid-1960s parachuted into the Atlantic, while most of the later Apollo capsules hit the Pacific. The lone Russian “splashdown” was in 1976 on a partially frozen lake amid a blizzard following an aborted mission; the harrowing recovery took hours.

SpaceX made history with this mission, which launched May 30 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. It was the first time a private company launched people into orbit and also the first launch of NASA astronauts from home turf in nearly a decade. Hurley came full circle, serving as pilot of NASA’s last space shuttle flight in 2011 and the commander of this SpaceX flight.

Musk monitored the descent and splashdown from SpaceX Mission Control in Hawthorne, California.

NASA turned to SpaceX and also Boeing to build capsules and ferry astronauts to and from the space station, following the retirement of the shuttles. Until Hurley and Behnken rocketed into orbit, NASA astronauts relied on Russian rockets. SpaceX already had experience hauling cargo to the space station, bringing those capsules back to a Pacific splashdown.

“This is the next era in human spaceflight where NASA gets to be the customer,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said from Johnson Space Center in Houston shortly before the astronauts’ return.

SpaceX needs six weeks to inspect the capsule before launching the next crew around the end of September. This next mission of four astronauts will spend a full six months aboard the space station. Hurley and Behnken’s capsule will be refurbished for another flight next spring. A Houston company run by a former NASA official, meanwhile, has partnered with SpaceX to send three customers to the space station in fall 2021.

Boeing doesn’t expect to launch its first crew until next year. The company encountered significant software problems in the debut of its Starliner capsule, with no one aboard, last year. Its capsules will touch down in the U.S. Southwest desert.

By beating Boeing, SpaceX laid claim to a small U.S. flag left at the space station by Hurley and the rest of the last shuttle crew. The flag — which also flew on the first shuttle flight — was carefully packed aboard the Dragon for the homecoming.

Also on board: a toy dinosaur named Tremor, sent into space by the astronauts’ young sons.

The boys recorded a wake-up call for their fathers Sunday morning, urging them to “rise and shine” and “we can’t wait to see you.”

“Don’t worry, you can sleep in tomorrow,” said Behnken’s 6-year-old son Theo, who was promised a puppy after the flight. “Hurry home so we can go get my dog.”


Montreal’s Jean-Doré beach re-opening pushed back to Monday

The re-opening of Montreal's Jean-Doré beach on Île Notre-Dame has been pushed back from Sunday to Monday due to bad weather conditions.


Montreal’s Jean-Doré beach re-opening pushed back to Monday

The re-opening of Montreal's Jean-Doré beach on Île Notre-Dame has been pushed back from Sunday to Monday due to bad weather conditions.


Arrest Made in an Assault with a Dangerous Weapon (Knife) Offense: 3800 Block of Minnesota Avenue, Northeast

Sunday, August 2, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department's Sixth District announce an arrest has been made in reference to an Assault with a Dangerous Weapon (Knife) offense that occurred on Saturday, August 1, 2020, in the 3800 block of Minnesota Avenue, Northeast.

At approximately 2:30 pm, the suspect and victim were involved in a verbal dispute at the listed location. The suspect brandished a knife and attempted to assault the victim. The suspect was unsuccessful and fled the scene. No injuries were reported.

Additionally, on Saturday, August 1, 2020, at approximately 3:27 pm, also in the 3800 block of Minnesota Avenue, Northeast, the suspect threatened a victim and damaged their vehicle. The suspect then fled the scene.

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, a 16 year-old juvenile male, of Southeast, DC, was arrested and charged with Assault with a Dangerous Weapon (Knife), Destruction of Property and Threats.


Arrest Made in a Burglary Two Offense: 800 Block of Upshur Street, Northwest

Sunday, August 2, 2020

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Department's Fourth District have announced an arrest has been made in reference to a Burglary Two offense that occurred on Sunday, July 5, 2020, in the 800 block of Upshur Street, Northwest.

At approximately 4:06 pm, the suspects forcibly gained entry to a residence at the listed location. Once inside, the suspects took property then fled the scene.

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, 60-year-old Linwood Earl Forte, of Northwest, DC, was arrested and charged with Burglary Two.

This case remains under investigation.

Anyone who has knowledge of this incident should take no action but call police at (202) 727-9099 or text your tip to the Department's TEXT TIP LINE at 50411. Crime Solvers of Washington, DC currently offers a reward of up to $1,000 to anyone who provides information that leads to the arrest and indictment of the person or persons responsible for a crime committed in the District of Columbia.


LIVE: Tracking SpaceX Crew Dragon’s splashdown near Pensacola

PENSACOLA, Fla. (WKRG) — WKRG News 5 is covering the historical SpaceX Return in the Gulf Coast Sunday.

Crews are in position to capture this memorable event near Pensacola. The splashdown is scheduled around 1:40 PM.

WKRG News 5 will share this moment on WKRG.com as well as its Facebook page. Additionally, special LIVE coverage will be on air.

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Birx warns US is ‘in a new phase’ of coronavirus pandemic with more widespread cases

(CNN) — Dr. Deborah Birx on Sunday said the US is in a new phase in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic, saying that the deadly virus is more widespread than when it first took hold in the US earlier this year.

“What we are seeing today is different from March and April. It is extraordinarily widespread. It’s into the rural as equal urban areas,” Birx, the White House coronavirus task force coordinator, told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union.”

Birx stressed that Americans need to follow health recommendations, including wearing a mask and practicing social distancing.

“To everybody who lives in a rural area, you are not immune or protected from this virus,” Birx said. “If you’re in multi-generational households, and there’s an outbreak in your rural area or in your city, you need to really consider wearing a mask at home, assuming that you’re positive, if you have individuals in your households with comorbidities.”

“This epidemic right now is different and it’s more widespread and it’s both rural and urban,” she added.

new ensemble forecast, published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, projects more than 173,000 American deaths by August 22, and former US Food and Drug Administrator Dr. Scott Gottlieb warned on CNBC last month that the coronavirus death toll could double to 300,000 deaths by the end of the year, if the country doesn’t change its trajectory.

On Sunday, Birx would not give a projection of how many deaths the US would see by the end of year, but she said a death toll largely depends on southern and western states to maintain and accelerate their mitigation efforts. Those states have become hot spots for the virus.

“It’s not super spreading individuals, it’s super spreading events and we need to stop those. We definitely need to take more precautions,” Birx told Bash.

Asked if it was time to reset the federal government response to the pandemic, Birx said, “I think the federal government reset about five to six weeks ago when we saw this starting to happen across the south.”

But roughly six weeks ago, Vice President Mike Pence, who heads the coronavirus task force, declared in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that the US is “winning the fight” and there “isn’t a ‘second wave.'” Birx did not address those claims on Sunday.

Birx said each state needs a “dramatically tailored” approach to Covid-19, with a “set of recommendations based on what we are seeing at the community level, what we are seeing relevant to the hospitals.”

The Trump administration has left many of the response decisions to state leaders, allowing governors to decide when to enforce or roll back coronavirus restrictions and when to close and reopen their state’s economy. A key question has been whether state and local leaders should allow in-person schooling as many near the start of the school year.

Bash on Sunday asked Birx if schools in states with a 5% positivity rate should remained closed or have distance learning only.

“If you have high case load and active community spread, just like we are asking people not to go to bars, not to have household parties, not to create large spreading events, we are asking people to distance learn at this moment so we can get this epidemic under control,” Birx responded, though she deferred to CDC guidelines on school reopenings.

Birx’s comments come as the US has reported more coronavirus cases and deaths than any other country.

As of Sunday, the US had reported more than 4.6 million cases of Covid-19 and at least 154,449 Americans have died, according to data from the Johns Hopkins University.


Sioux Valley Dakota Nation man dead after losing control of ATV: RCMP

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Bees do it, machines know it: Western University-led study hints at key to relationship satisfaction

This study is the "first-ever systematic attempt at using machine-learning algorithms to predict people’s relationship satisfaction," according to the university.


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Quebec reports 141 new COVID-19 cases and three more deaths

Quebec is reporting 141 new COVID-19 cases and three more deaths linked to the novel coronavirus.


Quebec reports 141 new COVID-19 cases and three more deaths

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Royalton Barracks / Motor vehicle crash and DUI arrest

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B202431 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Jeremy Lyon                              STATION: VSP Royalton                    CONTACT#: 802-234-9933   DATE/TIME: 8/1/2020 @ 11:20 am INCIDENT LOCATION: Interstate 89 south Mile Marker 16, Sharon VIOLATION: DUI   ACCUSED: Andrew Dayton


Royalton Barracks / Motor vehicle crash and DUI arrest

STATE OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY VERMONT STATE POLICE   NEWS RELEASE         CASE#: 20B202431 RANK/TROOPER FULL NAME: Trooper Jeremy Lyon                              STATION: VSP Royalton                    CONTACT#: 802-234-9933   DATE/TIME: 8/1/2020 @ 11:20 am INCIDENT LOCATION: Interstate 89 south Mile Marker 16, Sharon VIOLATION: DUI   ACCUSED: Andrew Dayton


Derby Barracks/Request for Information

STATE OF VERMONT  DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY  VERMONT STATE POLICE    PRESS RELEASE    INCIDENT:    CASE #: 20A502978    TROOPER: Abigail Drew                   STATION: Derby                        CONTACT#: 334-8881    DATE/TIME: 8/2/2020 at 0700 hours    LOCATION (specific) Shadow Lake Rd, Glover, VT    VIOLATION:


Harrogate beat Notts County to win promotion to League Two

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Harrogate beat Notts County to win promotion to League Two

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Dothan funeral home gives out free masks to Wiregrass residents

DOTHAN, Ala. (WDHN) — The Sunset Memorial Park and Funeral Home held a Mask Up Wiregrass event in their parking lot from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on July 31.

The owners wanted to stop the spread of COVID-19 so they gave out free masks to the people of the Wiregrass.

The memorial park is run by husband and wife, Robert and Toni Byrd.

In their line of business, they have seen more loss due to COVID-19 than anything else since 2020 began.

“What I do for a living, every day, I see the results of what has happened, and I said what can we do to help somebody?” Robert Byrd said.

The event itself took place Friday morning with people pulling up and telling staff how many masks they needed for their families.

With this event, owners and staff hope that citizens will understand how serious this situation is and do their part to help.

“We’re all in this together,” Toni Byrd said. “We all have to do our part. Be it all small, if it’s just wearing a mask or gloves, you know, whatever it is. That we’re in it together and that we’re behind it.”

The Sunset Memorial staff wanted to show what small acts can do to help towards a bigger cause.

“We want to do whatever we can do,” Robert Byrd said. “Whatever it takes, we want to do it. If we knew something else to do we’d do it but we’re going to do whatever we can.”


Dothan funeral home gives out free masks to Wiregrass residents

DOTHAN, Ala. (WDHN) — The Sunset Memorial Park and Funeral Home held a Mask Up Wiregrass event in their parking lot from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on July 31.

The owners wanted to stop the spread of COVID-19 so they gave out free masks to the people of the Wiregrass.

The memorial park is run by husband and wife, Robert and Toni Byrd.

In their line of business, they have seen more loss due to COVID-19 than anything else since 2020 began.

“What I do for a living, every day, I see the results of what has happened, and I said what can we do to help somebody?” Robert Byrd said.

The event itself took place Friday morning with people pulling up and telling staff how many masks they needed for their families.

With this event, owners and staff hope that citizens will understand how serious this situation is and do their part to help.

“We’re all in this together,” Toni Byrd said. “We all have to do our part. Be it all small, if it’s just wearing a mask or gloves, you know, whatever it is. That we’re in it together and that we’re behind it.”

The Sunset Memorial staff wanted to show what small acts can do to help towards a bigger cause.

“We want to do whatever we can do,” Robert Byrd said. “Whatever it takes, we want to do it. If we knew something else to do we’d do it but we’re going to do whatever we can.”


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Dodgers fan surprised with memento after his cardboard cutout hit by ball

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) – A Los Angeles Dodgers superfan had his cardboard cutout struck Saturday when catcher Will Smith hit his likeness during the game.

The Dodgers announced earlier this month that they were selling cardboard cutouts with fans’ photos to display in the stadium during the coronavirus pandemic in an effort to replicate the ballpark experience.

Austin Donley, 24, and his dad had purchased two cutouts since they’re usually in the stands attending games every summer.

Donley says he was at the beach Saturday while the game was going on, and when he checked his phone around the eighth inning, he had over 30 text messages. His mom sent him a video of Smith striking a home run and the ball hitting Donley’s cardboard in the neck.

Donley reached out to Smith on Twitter asking if he could keep the ball. To his surprise, the Dodger tweeted back saying, “Sorry I took your head off,” and said he would “hook it up.”

Smith even talked about it a post-game news conference, saying he wants to apologize to Donley again for “hitting his head off.”

Then on Wednesday, Donley received a package with a baseball bat inside, signed by Smith with a message that said, “Sorry I hit you in the face. Go Dodgers!”

If you want to get a taste of the ballpark delivered to your home too, the Dodgers will be selling their famous Dodger Dogs, along with other food and beverages, in parts of L.A. through Home Plates.

The cardboard cutouts are for sale and each cost either $299 for the Dugout Club and the new Pavilion Home Run Seats, or $149 for the Loge and Field levels. For pets that want to cheer on the Boys in Blue, cutouts of cats and dogs can be purchased too.

Proceeds from the cutouts go to the Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation, whose mission is to “improve education, health care, homelessness, and social justice for all Angelenos.”


Derby Barracks/MV Crash – Request for Information

STATE OF VERMONT  DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY  VERMONT STATE POLICE    PRESS RELEASE    MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH                                                                                          CASE#:  20A502974                                     TROOPER: Abigail Drew                   STATION: Derby                           CONTACT#: 334-8881


‘There was no warning’: How a collision with a Russian freighter 50 years ago nearly cut a B.C. ferry in half

On Aug. 2, 1970, a Russian freighter crashed into a B.C. ferry in Active Pass, almost slicing the ferry in two.


Intentionally set garage fire results in $30K in damage: Saskatoon fire department

Saskatoon fire crews battled a garage fire on Saturday evening. The damage was estimated at roughly $30,000.


One man shot, another stabbed in 2 separate incidents overnight in Montreal

Two incidents involving deadly weapons led to two hospitlizations overnight in Montreal.


World Snooker Championship: Five-time champion Ronnie O’Sullivan makes blistering start

Ronnie O'Sullivan makes a blistering start to his first-round match against Thailand's Thepchaiya Un-Nooh at the World Championship.


K-Dogg: BLM march held after Bristol race attack

Organisers say they wanted to show support for K-Dogg - the victim of an attack involving a car.


Could drive-in parties be the ‘new normal’?

A drive-in concert in Plymouth allowed people to have a festival experience while socially distancing.


The West Block — Episode 48, Season 9

Watch the full broadcast of The West Block from Sunday, August 2, 2020 with Farah Nasser.


Coventry climate change protest features 168 pairs of shoes

Extinction Rebellion Coventry hold a protest with 168 pairs of shoes to mark the city's deaths.


Huddersfield MP apologises for alleged anti-Semitic tweet

Labour's Barry Sheerman deleted the tweet and apologised "for the upset and offense I have caused".


Three killed, three injured in rollover crash on Interstate 225

Three people died and three others were seriously injured in a single-vehicle rollover crash on Interstate 225 Saturday.

The crash was reported at about 4:19 p.m. on I-225 northbound near Parker Road, said Colorado State Patrol Trooper Josh Lewis.

A woman in her mid-20s was driving a 2004 Ford Explorer with five passengers when she lost control of the SUV, over-corrected and went off the right side of the road, rolling the vehicle three times, Lewis said.

The driver and a man died at the scene, Lewis said, and second man was taken to a hospital where he died. A 20-year-old man, 35-year-old man and a woman were hospitalized with serious injuries; the woman’s injuries are life-threatening, Lewis said.

Both alcohol and speed are being investigated as potential causes of the crash, he said. The driver and the two men who survived the crash were wearing seatbelts. The other three passengers were not wearing seatbelts, and all three were ejected from the SUV during the crash.

The SUV, which is designed for five people, was overloaded with one extra person.


Lancaster County COVID-19 Update for August 2

Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird and the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) announced that 44 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Lancaster County today, bringing the community total to 3,118. The number of deaths in the community remains at 15.

Visit COVID19.lincoln.ne.gov to access a dashboard that summarizes Lancaster County COVID-19 data.


Bob Rae: Global coronavirus solution to be top priority in UN ambassador role

Rae also weighed in on the WE Charity scandal, saying he doesn't think Justin Trudeau has a ethics blind spot.


Tory MP not suspended over rape allegation arrest while investigation ongoing

The decision will be reviewed once the police investigation has concluded, the party says.


Minke whale on Hartlepool coast saved from being stranded

Rescuers had hoped to secure the whale again so it can be checked by a vet but it swam away.


Lewis Hamilton wins British GP after puncture on last lap

Lewis Hamilton wins seventh career British Grand Prix with shredded tyre after getting puncture on final lap.


Tracking the Tropics: Wind, rain from Tropical Storm Isaias hits Florida coast

TAMPA (WFLA) — Tropical storm conditions are expected to spread north along the east coast of Florida as Isaias creeps away from the Bahamas Sunday.

According to the 11 a.m. advisory, Tropical Storm Isaias is producing 65 mph maximum sustained winds while moving north, northwest at 8 mph.

The storm is still bringing heavy rainfall and gusty winds to the northwestern Bahamas with tropical storm conditions on their way to the Florida coast.

The east coast of the United States is under a Tropical Storm Warning from Hollywood, Florida to South Carolina.

Gusty winds and passing storms are expected in the Tampa Bay area Sunday as Isaias heads north.

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Coronavirus: 87 per cent of Hong Kong employees suffering work stress during Covid-19 pandemic, survey finds

Nearly nine in 10 Hong Kong employees suffered from stress at work during the Covid-19 pandemic, with about half of the city’s workforce reporting symptoms of anxiety disorder, a university survey on mental health has found.The study designed by the Medical Health Association of Hong Kong found that those working in the tourism sector were most stressed, followed by staff in the medical and catering industries.Researchers devised a scale to calculate respondents’ stress levels – with 0 to 13…


Denver weather: Severe storms could bring hail, damaging winds to Front Range Sunday

Strong scattered thunderstorms are expected along the Front Range Sunday afternoon, with potentially large hail and damaging winds.

The thunderstorms will develop Sunday afternoon along the Interstate 25 corridor and the Front Range, according to the National Weather Service at Boulder. The strongest storms are expected between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. before moving south to the Palmer Divide around 8 p.m.

Hail, gusty winds and heavy rainfall are likely, and there’s a marginal chance some storms could become severe with large hail and damaging winds, according to the weather service.

In Denver, isolated showers and thunderstorms are expected to start after 1 p.m. Before then, the city will see sunny skies with a high of 86.


Hong Kong cash handout: the new immigrants struggling to ride out the Covid-19 crisis without HK$10,000 government payment

Hong Kong’s non-permanent residents on low incomes are appealing to the government to bring forward the distribution of a HK$10,000 handout, with the Covid-19 pandemic leaving many of them jobless.New immigrants were left out of the payout scheme for permanent residents when it was announced in February, but officials later said they could apply for the same sum in September – weeks after millions of those holding the full residency status actually received the cash.In a blog post on Sunday,…


Oregon State Police is Seeking the Public’s Assistance Regarding the Unlawful Waste of a Mule Deer – Baker County

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking the public's help to identify the person(s)responsible for shooting a mule deer and leaving it to waste on private property at Smith Lake just outside of Baker City.  This likely occurred the evening of July 27 or the early morning hours of July 28, 2020.

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Sgt. Isaac Cyr through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or *OSP (mobile) or at the local Baker City OSP Office at 541-403-7808.

 

** Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators** 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

* 5 Points-Mountain Sheep

* 5 Points-Mountain Goat

* 5 Points-Moose

* 5 Points-Wolf

* 4 Points-Elk

* 4 Points-Deer

* 4 Points-Antelope

* 4 Points-Bear

* 4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
* $1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
* $500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
* $300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
* $300 Habitat Destruction 
* $100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
* $100 Furbearers 

* $100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or *OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 – Deschutes County

On Saturday,  August 1, 2020, at approximately 1:22 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the intersection of Hwy 97 and O'Neil Hwy for a two-vehicle crash.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2004 Honda Odyssey, operated by Robert Gregg (53) of Madras, was entering Hwy 97 when it was struck by a southbound commercial motor vehicle operated by Alfonso Lopez (56) of Colton, CA.

Gregg and his passenger, Antonia Romero (46) of Madras, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

Lopez was not injured.

Hwy 97 was partially closed for several hours during the investigation.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Redmond Fire Department and ODOT.


Watchdog calls for maximum suspension of Brampton councillor amid sexual misconduct allegations

A report from the commissioner says a complainant has come forward with allegations of sexual assault and harassment against Ward 9 and 10 Coun. Gurpreet Dhillon.


Watchdog calls for maximum suspension of Brampton councillor amid sexual misconduct allegations

A report from the commissioner says a complainant has come forward with allegations of sexual assault and harassment against Ward 9 and 10 Coun. Gurpreet Dhillon.


3.1-magnitude quake wakes up San Francisco Bay Area, USGS reports

A 3.1-magnitude earthquake near San Jose woke up people across the San Francisco Bay Area in California, the U.S. Geological Survey reports. The 5-mile deep quake hit near Alum Rock … Click to Continue »


Arab City Schools superintendent Dr. Johnny Berry gives insight on plans for return to school

It’s a common phrase as schools get ready to return to class in Alabama – taking precautions.

Masks and social distancing are going to be the new normal for in-person schooling.

Arab City Schools Superintendent Dr. Johnny Berry says the return to school will be a learning experience for everyone.

You can watch our full interview with Dr. Berry below:


Dunkin’ and Post launch new breakfast cereal

America’s favorite beverage and favorite breakfast are joining up.

Dunkin’ has partnered with Post to create Dunkin’ Cereal. Together, they brewed two flavors: Caramel Macchiato and Mocha Latte.

One has crunchy cereal pieces and caramel-swirled marshmallows, while the other has hints of chocolate and latte-swirled marshmallows.

Each cereal contains caffeine, but only about 1/10 of a cup of coffee. Dunkin’ says the new product will be rolled out nationwide this month.


Lincoln Woods Barracks

At 12:26 AM, Troopers arrested Derek Baptista, age 20, of 39 King Street, North Providence, Rhode Island, for Delivery/Possession with Intent to Deliver/Manufacture Schedule I/II Controlled Substance and Possession of Marijuana- More than One Ounce. The arrest was the result of a motor vehicle stop


Call of the Wilde: Montreal Canadiens dump Pittsburgh Penguins in OT

What a game we got in the opener as the Montreal Canadiens and Pittsburgh Penguins went to overtime before the Habs won 3-2.


Stolen teddy bear with dying mother’s voice returned to daughter after actor Ryan Reynolds and others offered a $15,000 reward

(CNN) — A Vancouver woman has been reunited with a teddy bear that has special significance for her.

Mara Soriano’s mother, Marilyn Soriano, 53, died on June 29, 2019, after battling cancer. Mara Soriano said her mom gifted her the bear, which includes a voice-recorded message, shortly before her passing.

During a hectic move last week, the bear was stolen from outside the U-Haul that Soriano and her fiance rented to transport their belongings. It was packed in a bag with other valuables.

On Saturday, after CNN’s news partner CBC reported a story about the missing bear, the search for Soriano’s bear spread quickly across social media and caught the attention of actor Ryan Reynolds.

Reynolds offered a reward of $5,000 for the return of the bear. Other celebrities including Dan Levy and Zach Braff tweeted their sentiments in hopes of reuniting Soriano with the bear.

After Reynolds’ offer, Soriano told CNN on Thursday that Canadian TV and radio personality George Stroumboulopoulos and Kraft Peanut Butter each pitched in $5,000, making the total reward offer $15,000.

In a tweet Wednesday, Soriano said the bear had been returned to her by two Good Samaritans “without a scratch on her” and voice box intact. The only thing missing was the bear’s glasses, a replica of the ones her mother wore.

“It means just everything to me honestly,” Soriano said. “There was a part of me that thought I’d never see it again, for sure. It’s a big city, there were so many places she could have been, it was like trying to find a needle in a haystack.”

“Now that I’ve got her (the bear), I just feel a little bit more hopeful and a little bit more bright,” she said. “Every time I look at that bear now it’s just a reminder that my mom really is with me always, that she’ll always come back to me.”

“In happier news… thank you everyone who searched high and low,” Reynolds tweeted Wednesday. “To the person who took the bear, thanks for keeping it safe. Vancouver is awesome.”

Security footage from Soriano’s apartment building revealed a man taking the bag packed with her valuables, according to CBC. The men who returned her bear told Soriano they found it at a nearby park.

Soriano spoke with Reynolds and said he wired the reward money to men who found the bear. She said she’s in contact with Stroumboulopoulos and Kraft Peanut Butter to get the good Samaritans their full reward.


In-person or remote learning? Colorado parents agonize over decision — especially those who feel they have no choice

Guilt awaits Ruth Barnett-Alvarez at the end of every path as she traverses the rocky terrain of figuring out how her family of five kids — with two working parents — will head back to school during the ongoing pandemic.

The Colorado Springs mom feels guilty for wanting to send her 8-year-old and 9-year-old to in-person learning in Harrison School District Two, which, like many, is also offering the choice of online education.

She worries her kids could contract or spread COVID-19. But who would watch them while Barnett-Alvarez works as a paralegal and her husband sleeps during the day to recuperate from driving trucks overnight?

Barnett-Alvarez feels guilty for considering keeping her 11-year-old and 15-year-old home — and away from their school social circles — for remote learning, in the hopes of reducing their family’s virus risk by entrusting her older kids to learn more independently.

The 38-year-old feels guilty for loving her job and being made to feel as though she has to choose between her career and her children.

“I’m so stressed out,” Barnett-Alvarez said. “I love my career, and this whole thing is picking between our safety. It’s a safety concern either way. If I don’t have anyone to watch them while they’re home, that’s a concern. Them bringing the virus home — that’s a concern. My 1-year-old being at a day care with other kids and you don’t know where their families have been — that’s a concern. My 15-year-old being asked to be responsible for all his younger siblings all day — that’s too much. It’s all too much.”

Barnett-Alvarez is one of countless Colorado parents tasked with making agonizing decisions about how to proceed with their children’s education as school resumes in the coming weeks, choices that are as much about those kids’ health — and can also deeply impact families’ finances.

Parents are navigating a patchwork of fall reopening plans that typically include fully online options and some variation on in-person education, too. These plans not only vary by district but seemingly by the day. Denver Public Schools, for example, went from announcing a hybrid online and in-person plan at the end of May to a five-days-a-week in-person plan in June to delaying in-person learning into early September in July to postponing most kids’ return to the classroom until at least mid-October less than two weeks later.

If parents manage to keep up with the whiplash of changing plans and public health guidance, they’re faced with more bewilderment trying to best discern what’s safe for their children. Studies about kids and COVID-19 continue to make headlines, but the fact of the matter is the virus is still too new to fully understand how it impacts and interacts with children — How likely is it they get sick? Can they spread the virus? — as evidenced by a slew of evolving and conflicting information.

Nevertheless, the decision about whether kids learn from home or in their classrooms could impact their education, alter family structures, influence parents’ careers or, potentially, result in life or death consequences as COVID-19 continues to spread through the community.

Every family has its own circumstances to mull — health concerns, child care shortages for working or single parents, necessity for special-education services — making some feel like they don’t have a choice in the matter at all. Some parents are finding themselves in a no-win situation where the stakes have never seemed higher.

Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Buth Barnett-Alvarez, second from left, tries to keep on her stepdaughter, Sophie, 9, third from left, who’s getting dragged by her daughter, Storey, 11, in the living room after dinner at their home in Colorado Springs on July 29, 2020. Ruthie’s son, Micah, 15, left, keeps to himself.

“Sometimes we don’t have an option”

In the spring when school buildings across Colorado shuttered to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, Barnett-Alvarez installed three cameras in her home so she could watch her children from her phone while she worked. She can talk to the kids through the cameras, she said, and at least have the option to review footage if she were to come home and find one of her crew with a black eye.

“I’m at work worrying, ‘Are they OK?’ ” Barnett-Alvarez said. “Are they going to kill each other? But this way, I could talk to them and check in throughout the day.”

Barnett-Alvarez commended her employer for being accommodating, allowing her to work from home and trying to work around her child care needs. However, the paralegal said she is now voluntarily back at the office after struggling to accomplish anything with five kids vying for her attention. Work days from home continued turning into runs to the store to buy more snacks or time spent mediating squabbles.

“If they close schools again and they all have to do remote learning, I don’t know what I’m going to do,” Barnett-Alvarez said. “How much can you really ask of your employer? They hired me thinking I had everything under control. Now none of us do. I’m not a teacher. I didn’t go into that field for a reason. I just feel guilty all of the time.”

Monica Warstler can relate.

The Westminster mom of three is divorced and co-parenting with her ex-husband. The 33-year-old works at a call center requiring her to be on the phone from the moment she clocks in. Her ex-husband with a more flexible work schedule picked up their 5-, 6- and 8-year-old kids to help them with their remote learning in the spring when the children had several daily live, online lessons they needed to attend. But Warstler said that dynamic caused too much conflict among the family and won’t work again in the fall.

Needing to work to feed herself and her children, Warstler said she’ll have to send her kids back to their classrooms if that remains an option.

“I pretty much don’t have a choice right now,” she said. “I feel like my only option is in-person learning even if I am concerned about the coronavirus.”

If Westminster Public Schools reverses course and stops offering any classroom education — a move Colorado’s largest districts already have made at least for the first weeks of school — Warstler said she may look into homeschooling her kids so that at least their learning could revolve around her schedule.

Due to her pandemic-induced child care situation, Warstler is on the hunt for a job that may provide her some more flexibility, but she’s having trouble finding something offering that wiggle room and allowing her to support her family.

“A lot of parents either are essential workers or they don’t have a flexible job,” Warstler said. “I wish the schools would try to create a more flexible plan for students. Of course we care about the teachers. We don’t want them to get sick. But sometimes we don’t have an option. It’s even harder when parents are single.”

Kathryn Scott, Special to The Denver Post

Pete and Pamela Leon want their two children, Lexi, 15, left, and Chris, 13, to attend in-person classes this fall in the Cherry Creek School District but are concerned about the possibility the two could contract or spread the coronavirus. The family gathers outside their apartment in Denver on July 30, 2020.

“This is survival mode”

Craig Knippenberg, a Denver-based mental health therapist for children and families, said parents should remind themselves that this is still survival mode and, during these trying pandemic times, being merely good enough is an accomplishment.

He recommends parents compartmentalize, setting limits on how long each day they’re going to worry about different concerns like researching homeschooling or listening to the news so that it doesn’t become all consuming.

As a parent of a Denver Public Schools freshman, Knippenberg said he understands the whirlwind families are experiencing.

“Guilt is not going to help you,” Knippenberg said. “This is survival mode. You’re just trying to do the best you can and get through it. Kids are far more resilient than you think. They’ll be OK. Concentrate on providing them shelter, physical safety, food, a little time to play and some laughter. Just cuddling up on the sofa for some quality time makes up for a lot.”

Pete Leon, a father to two children living with autism, said families with kids who have special needs must sort through an added layer of pros and cons as they decide how to send their children back to school.

Leon said Cherry Creek School District teachers tried their best in difficult circumstances to tend to the needs of his 13-year-old and 15-year-old in the spring, but that remote learning just didn’t provide his kids with the individualized special education they normally need to thrive academically.

“I don’t think I have any choice,” Leon said. “In order for them to get the supports they need, it has to be in-person. That’s the only option it seems for special-needs kids.”

Cherry Creek’s re-opening plan says students with special needs enrolled in remote learning will attend appropriate synchronous lessons and be provided targeted supports, interventions and therapies throughout the day. For in-person special-education learning, the plan says students will attend their specific classes and pull-out services as usual with social distancing.

Leon, who works retail, said he’s worried about the virus.

“If I bring (COVID-19) home from work and they take that to school, I’m very concerned about it,” Leon said. “But I don’t seem to have an option based on what I saw in the spring.”

“What is the right thing to do?”

Sarah Orsborn did feel as though she had a choice, but making the decision was unlike any experience she’s faced.

“I consider myself a super decisive person,” said Orsborn, a parent to twin girls in Denver Public Schools. “I always feel I can make choices very easily. I’ve made big choices in small amounts of time before, and this feels so difficult compared to that. What is the right thing to do? What is the ethical way to be a member of my community? What is the best for my children?”

Orsborn has a congenital heart defect, putting her at higher risk of contracting the coronavirus. Orsborn said she felt encouraged bouncing her questions off her husband — an emergency room physician and pediatrician — and understanding that her 8-year-olds are not likely to be virus super-spreaders. However, with the family already at risk of exposure due to his medical work, Orsborn decided it was best to play it safe and enroll her kids in remote learning.

With the privilege of being a stay-at-home mom, Orsborn said she thought choosing remote learning both supported the public school system she and her family love while also making space in classrooms for students whose parents didn’t have a choice but to send them to school.

Denver Public Schools reaffirmed Orsborn’s decision Wednesday, announcing the delay of in-person learning to at least mid-October for most students.

Knippenberg admitted that delay was not the news his household had been hoping for, but that at least it provided some stability in a rapidly changing world.

It’s OK and normal for parents to feel like they need a break from their kids, Knippenberg said.

“That doesn’t make you a bad parent,” he said. “A lot of trauma work is just validating that you had a normal response to an abnormal situation. That takes a lot of weight off. We don’t always have the control we’d like to have. We’re going to need to have a tolerance for ambiguity for all of this.”


In HBO film, Ken Buck suggests he will leave Congress soon

In an upcoming HBO documentary, U.S. Rep. Ken Buck paints a bleak picture not only of Congress but also of his own political party and the conservative movement in this era of President Donald Trump, before suggesting he will retire soon.

“The problem with the Republican Party now is that we have such a fresh history of violating the Constitution, of violating fiscal responsibility, of violating personal accountability, that we don’t have a high ground to stand (on) and say, ‘You guys are doing the wrong thing,’ ” says Buck, a Windsor Republican and chairman of the Colorado Republican Party, in a documentary called “The Swamp.”

The movie, which debuts 7 p.m. Tuesday, follows three Republican congressmen — Buck, Matt Gaetz of Florida and Thomas Massie of Kentucky — through 2019 as they reveal their frustrations with the influence of lobbyists, the power of congressional leadership and a lack of legislative progress. In the film, which The Denver Post screened, Buck often appears exasperated and cynical.

“As you see from our movie, Ken is sad,” said Morgan Pehme, one of the film’s directors, in an interview. “Ken is beaten down by the system. I feel sad for Ken sometimes because you go in there, you think you’re going to make a difference, you’re a member of Congress, you have the pin on, and then you realize you’re just another vote in the pocket of (congressional) leadership.”

U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, center, walks alongside Rep. Matt Gaetz, left, and Rep. Thomas Massie, right, in a scene from HBO’s “The Swamp.” Photo provided by HBO.

During one scene late in the film, a camera pans over a framed Post article from Buck’s first congressional election victory in 2014, which hangs in Buck’s office near the U.S. Capitol. Then he offers a dark assessment of his tenure.

“I have to tell you, I think this place has drained me of a certain amount of life. After having been here for five years, I have no illusion that what I say, anybody cares about. I have thought about leaving and I don’t know whether this is my last term or whether I’ll run for one more term. I do know that a lot of the folks at home will not understand the long-term implications of what’s happening here in D.C.”

Buck did ultimately decide to run for re-election in 2020 and is favored to win over Democratic challenger Ike McCorkle on Nov. 3 in the safely Republican 4th Congressional District of eastern Colorado. McCorkle said it’s disingenuous for Buck to distance himself from a corrupt political establishment the congressman is a prominent part of.

“He hasn’t done anything for Colorado and even admits so himself,” McCorkle said of Buck’s remarks. “Coloradans need real fighters in Congress who will represent their interests. I’ll be that fighter, because as a veteran and Purple Heart recipient, I always have been. If Ken Buck isn’t up to the job, he needs to step down.”

Reached for comment, Buck’s spokeswoman, Lindsey Curnutte, said he remains focused on serving his constituents in the 4th District and hasn’t discussed any retirement plans with his staff.

If Buck retires before the 2022 election, there will likely be a crowded Republican primary to succeed him. The 4th District currently includes Douglas County, home to several Republican state legislators and ambitious politicians. That may change when congressional districts are redrawn following the 2020 Census, however.

Buck was a founding member of the House Freedom Caucus, which formed in 2015 to act as an ultra-conservative voice and quickly proved willing to criticize Republican leadership for being insufficiently conservative, especially on fiscal matters. But the caucus’s influence has dwindled in recent years and its members have rarely criticized Trump, despite his disinterest in fiscal conservatism.

“This president has presented budgets that are huge,” Buck says in the film. “Typically, the Freedom Caucus would be leading the charge to criticize an executive branch proposal that costs that much money. Now that’s just not the case and it’s not the case because when the Freedom Caucus members look at their political base, they realize that so much of their base are Trump lovers (and) nothing this president does can possibly be wrong, so they can’t criticize the president.”

The congressman expands on this train of thought in the film’s closing minutes, telling an interviewer, “Taking on President Trump is unwise and President Trump has no problem doing a touchdown dance every time a Republican critic loses, and so he reinforces the idea that it is a bad idea to take him on.”

The documentary was partly inspired by Buck’s 2017 book “Drain the Swamp,” according to Pehme and co-director Daniel DiMauro. The directors describe themselves as liberals who were surprised to discover how many government reform ideas they share with a hardline conservative like Buck. The Coloradan was the first member of Congress who agreed to take part in the documentary.

Pehme and DiMauro believe the film is an opportunity to bring Americans of all ideologies together in agreement that Congress has been made impotent by infighting and made corrupt by corporate lobbying and almost constant fundraising.

“Although ideologically we disagree with (Buck) on so many things, the fact is we agree with him on two fundamental things that we think are so critical for the future of our country, which is the corruption of the Congress and the issue with never-ending wars around the world,” DiMauro said in an interview.

Pehme said Buck, a 61-year-old who has battled cancer and survived a heart attack, wrestled throughout 2019 with whether to run for re-election in 2020 or retire from Congress, before ultimately deciding on the former route.

“There was an opportunity with this movie,” Pehme said, “for Ken to be a Gary Cooper-type figure who just walks out of the town as the sheriff, hangs up the sheriff’s badge and walks off into the sunset.”


As crews dig up lead-poisoned dirt, accelerated cleanup of Pueblo Superfund site cast as EPA model

PUEBLO — For more than a decade, the Gonzales family ate chilis, cucumbers and tomatoes grown in a garden behind their house in the low-income Bessemer neighborhood, where industrial smelters a century ago belched pollution.

Environmental Protection Agency tests last year found their soil was poisoned with lead.

“We were like, ‘What? All this time? Rolling in the grass?’ ” Michael Gonzales, 61, said this week. “It doesn’t feel good.”

EPA crews had just dug out that garden two feet deep, removed other soil around the house, and hauled it all away to a dump before back-filling with imported dirt — part of an expedited Superfund cleanup targeting 1,900 properties within a half mile of a smokestack torn down in 1923.

Federal contractors also scoured inside the Gonzales house, installed a crushed-rock driveway and were preparing to lay sod, before moving next door. Michael and Joann Gonzales said they’re pleased and feeling better about their grandchildren visiting, though possible health harm remained a mystery because they and their two sons haven’t had blood tests.

Longtime Pueblo residents Joann and Michael ...
Bruce Finley, The Denver Post

Longtime Pueblo residents Joann and Michael Gonzales stand at the door of their home on Monday, July 27, 2020. EPA contractors had just replaced the lead-contaminated dirt in their yard as part of a Superfund cleanup that officials say has been accelerated due to acute health risks.

It took 106 years for the government to address the toxic contamination from the smelters that turned mined rock into metals, but poisoned workers’ neighborhoods on Pueblo’s south side. The smelting to extract silver and lead between 1893 and 1908 left a legacy of arsenic, cadmium and lead in soil and household dust at levels up to five times higher than the EPA’s threshold for emergency action — pollution federal documents say children likely absorbed into their blood at levels more than double the amount that stunts brain development.

Today’s residents, including some whose families have lived here for multiple generations, say they simply endured, seldom suspecting unreasonable impacts, unaware of poisoned dirt and not demanding cleanup. Italian, Slavic, Swedish, Hispanic and other immigrant factory workers built up the neighborhoods. The latest census figures show harder times after factories closed with median income around $20,000 for current residents, predominantly Latino, and 25% in poverty.

EPA chief Andrew Wheeler saw the Colorado Smelter Superfund site during a visit last week and called his agency’s 2018 acceleration of the cleanup, compelled by acute human health risks, “maybe the single best decision” the EPA has made since voters elected President Donald Trump. The Trump administration has weakened dozens of the nation’s rules to protect the environment while re-focusing the EPA on cleanups.

Wheeler also cast this five-year project, expected to cost taxpayers $75 million, as a matter of justice.

“Environmental justice is not just about race, it is about socioeconomics,” Wheeler said. “Everybody deserves to have a clean environment, regardless of what zip code they live in.”

Environmental justice concerns have reverberated this summer during nationwide street demonstrations sparked by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd. Demonstrators are looking beyond criminal justice at broader inequities and demanding fairness in who bears the burdens of human industrial degradation of air, water and soil.

Those demands will intensify, especially as climate warming from burning fossil fuels affects more people, said Denver-based activist Ean Tafoya, a co-director of the Colorado Latino Forum and organizer for the national advocacy group Green Latinos.

“We have to take the offensive,” Tafoya said. “Leaders of the demonstrations understand that our oppression does not stop with police.”

APTIM workers perform a cleanup to ...
Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

A trail off Santa Fe Avenue near Chem-Way Lawn Care leads to a pile of slag waste from the Colorado Smelter on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. The site is part of an accelerated EPA Superfund cleanup.

“An acute health risk situation”

The poisoning in Pueblo began in 1883 when the Colorado Smelting Company set up an ore-processing factory on a mesa south of the Arkansas River, one of five smelters back then. Operators ran 11 furnaces in extracting silver and lead. They dumped molten waste slag into a ravine.

Colorado Smelting merged into the American Smelting and Refining Company, or ASARCO, in 1899. ASARCO maximized profits and in 1908 closed the smelter, selling its property to the Newton Lumber Company. The land later sold to multiple small businesses and individuals. ASARCO has gone bankrupt. EPA officials said they cannot identify anybody responsible for the pollution with the ability to pay for cleanup.

Lead can damage nerves, slow brain development and cause anemia. Children are most susceptible. Long-term exposure also can worsen high blood pressure, kidney problems and dementia. And lead accumulated in the body can stay there for years.

State health department officials first found evidence of trouble here in the early 1990s, records show. Starting in 2015, the EPA measured lead contamination of soil at up to 1,470 parts per million and in houses at up to 2,060 ppm, according to federal records.

EPA officials this week told The Denver Post toxic contamination of soil has measured as high as 2,210 ppm for lead (5.5 times higher than an EPA “action level” threshold), 273 ppm for arsenic and 44 ppm for cadmium (a heavy metal that causes cancer). An agency risk assessment document says the contamination at these levels means children likely absorbed lead in their blood “above 20 micrograms per deciliter,” which is more than twice as high as blood lead levels from 2 to 8 micrograms that can hurt brain functioning.

A lone scooter rests on the ...
Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

A lone scooter rests on the cracked sidewalks of Eilers Avenue on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Ingesting lead is harmful to people of all ages, but children are particularly impacted.

The federal government formally declared an environmental disaster in 2014 and Pueblo rocketed to top priority among the two dozen or so other Superfund sites around Colorado. Some cleanups have dragged out for decades.

At the Bonita Peak Mining District site encompassing the Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado, EPA officials haven’t finalized a cleanup plan five years after an EPA crew triggered a blowout in 2015 that turned the Animas River mustard yellow, let alone complete cleanup, as agency experts struggle to map toxic water seepage through the underground equivalent of Swiss cheese in heavily-mined mountains.

“What’s unique about Pueblo is that you’ve got an acute health risk situation. We’re talking about elevated lead in soil, in neighborhood yards, where children play,” EPA regional administrator Greg Sopkin said in an interview.

“You’re dealing with kids, potential loss of IQ, and a lot of it is irreversible,” Sopkin said. “There’s been blood work done. There have been high levels of lead found in blood. I don’t know about health effects associated with that. There’s certainly evidence there was a problem.”

The testing of soil and dust inside more than 1,700 homes, and roughly 200 commercial properties, has been voluntary, leading to soil replacement where necessary. EPA officials have projected excavation will be necessary at nearly 900 homes and the number could increase. Pueblo and state health agencies can conduct free blood tests when residents request them.

A previous EPA cleanup of toxic soil in Denver — the 4-square-mile Vasquez Boulevard/Interstate 70 Superfund site — required excavations at 823 homes, mostly between 2003 and 2006, where industrial smelting a century ago had spread waste. The arsenic contamination measured up to 1,418 ppm and lead up to 1,715 ppm — lower than the lead levels at the Pueblo site, but also high enough to hurt children.

Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

Cindy Hanson, right, sits with her two grandchildren, Jake Bach, 7, and Jayden Bach, 10, at their home in the Bessemer neighborhood on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Jake and Jayden just moved in with their mother to this home five months ago, but Cindy said she has lived there and known about the environmental issues in Bessemer her whole life.

Environmental disasters

Nearly 50 million people in the United States, about 16% of the population, live within three miles of an environmental disaster so severe that the federal government has stepped in and launched a Superfund cleanup.

Under Trump, EPA officials have focused on cleanups required at about 1,300 National Priority List environmental disasters, and in 2019 they were able to delete all or portions of 27 sites from the list — the most since 2001.

Many cleanups lag due to government bureaucratic processes and a lack of funding, which has dwindled since Congress in 1980 established the Superfund with a tax on industry to cover costs when officials cannot locate a responsible polluter able to pay for cleanup.

“The point of the Superfund program is to someday have no more cleanup to do,” Wheeler, the EPA administrator, said last week at a gathering with Pueblo leaders. “The point of the program is not to get caught up in the process but to focus on the progress of cleaning up a site.”

By 2023, the Colorado smelter cleanup will be done, EPA officials announced, sticking with a five-year expedited schedule instead of the initially anticipated 10 years or more. That’s assuming that cleanup workers will be able to resume their work inside houses to remove contaminated dust, which have been suspended due to concerns about the coronavirus pandemic.

Colorado health officials said Pueblo’s south side is becoming safer as EPA crews roll house to house, and urged action at other Superfund sites.

“We would certainly like to see quicker progress wherever we can,” said Doug Jamison, the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment’s cleanup leader.

APTIM workers perform a cleanup to ...
Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

APTIM workers perform a cleanup of contaminated soil at a home on the corner of B and Palm streets on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.

Replacing soil

Pueblo residents have welcomed the removal of toxic soil, expected to raise property values. However, some are complaining about the quality of imported dirt.

“It is dirt from the mountains, like cement. They told me they were going to give me good dirt,” said Antonia Canas, 79, in front of the house where’s she’s lived since 1959.

Nearby at the house where Karen Garcia, 57, has lived all her life except when she went to Alamosa for college, EPA testing contractors “said I had both lead and arsenic.”

Garcia assumed this contamination hasn’t affected her, yet lamented that now her flowers won’t grow back. “They called it ‘topsoil’ but it wasn’t very good quality. The grass took on it but none of the plants. It’s like clay and doesn’t drain.”

A storm led to flooding in her re-made backyard. “They’d had me sign off on everything,” yet she contacted a project supervisor and sent him a photo showing the flooding. “I’m not satisfied with that ugly dirt they put in my yard. Even weeds aren’t growing.”

Others raised concerns about renters and owners who didn’t request soil tests, leaving contaminated properties interspersed among cleaned ones.

“And I asked them, ‘How about my vents?’ ” Abrina Wilder, 75, said, referring to the cleanup crew that vacuumed inside the house she’s owned for 50 years. “And they said, ‘They didn’t tell us to do the vents.’ ”

Lead and arsenic levels in her home “were pretty high,” she said, adding that she attended EPA-run community meetings and asked questions.

“They said the lead leaves your system after awhile,” Wilder said, reclining on a chair atop polished wood floors looking out at a square green front lawn.

Yet she wondered, with weak bones, about health effects, though she was gone 40 years living in Seattle. “Who knows?”

APTIM workers perform a cleanup to ...
Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

Abrina Wilder poses for a portrait inside of her home on Eilers Avenue on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Wilder has owned her home for 50 years, unknowingly buying a property that had lead contamination in its soil.

“A no-brainer”

The EPA’s Louisiana-based contractor APTIM is relying on local workers to excavate contaminated soil using shovels and heavy yellow machinery. Mask-wearing men in green vests this week said the hours are good, the pay decent. Lifelong residents such as Isaac Hernandez, 42, were motivated to help their home city.

“We have people come up to us every day,” Hernandez said, “and ask if we’re still testing.”

EPA officials encouraged participation. “If you have children,” Wheeler told local leaders as television reporters looked on, “make sure you volunteer to have your yard tested.”

Pueblo Mayor Nick Gradisar called the decision to do that “a no-brainer.”

Meanwhile the century-old heaps of black slag, covering 700,000 square feet, still sit in the ravine by train tracks pending completion of agency investigations and a remedy that may require removal. Homeless people camp around the slag despite fences and warning signs.

Once EPA leaders declare the cleanup done, this site can become eligible for federal “brownfields” redevelopment grants. Pueblo city and county officials have made a plan for community revitalization.

Wheeler pointed to the location along the Interstate 25 corridor. “This site clearly has a lot of potential for a lot of industries,” he said, such as commercial “fulfillment centers” for processing customer orders.

Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

A trail off Santa Fe Avenue near Mesa Street leads to piles of slag waste from the Colorado Smelter on the south side of Pueblo on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.


Post Premium: Our best stories for the week of July 27-Aug. 2


With the start of school just weeks away and COVID-19 still spreading in Colorado, parents across the state are grappling with the question of how to continue their children’s education.

Send them back into the classroom where they may be at greater risk of contracting or helping spread the virus? Or keep them home and opt for remote learning?

Faced with constantly shifting school reopening plans and public health guidance, It’s a decision about safety and education. But for many, it’s also financial. Can parents even afford to stay home to help their kids through online schooling?

As Elizabeth Hernandez, one of The Denver Post’s education reporters, found, it’s an agonizing dilemma for many parents as they try to decide what’s best — and maybe most realistic — for their children and families.

Read more in today’s Post.

— Matt Sebastian, The Denver Post 

In-person or remote learning? Colorado parents agonize over decision — especially those who feel they have no choice

Ruthie Garnett-Alvarez, center, holds her 18-month-old ...
Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Ruth Barnett-Alvarez, center, holds her 18-month-old son Damien at the dinner table with her husband Matthew, left, and their kids at their home in Colorado Springs on July 29, 2020. Ruth is a paralegal and Matthew is a truck driver. Both are struggling with whether to send their kids back to school or to attempt to balance working while supervising remote learning.


Five in-depth looks at Colorado in the age of coronavirus

Polis says it’s “reasonably safe” to reopen schools as Colorado tells educators how to handle COVID-19 outbreaks

Colorado Governor Jared Polis holds up ...
David Zalubowski, The Associated Press

Colorado Governor Jared Polis holds up his face mask to make a point during a news conference on the state’s efforts against the new coronavirus, Tuesday, July 21, 2020, in Denver.

Gov. Jared Polis on Thursday said it’s “reasonably safe” to reopen Colorado’s schools in the coming weeks, as the state health agency released specific steps local educators should take to address any COVID-19 outbreaks within their facilities. Read more here…

RELATED: Colorado teachers worried about COVID-19 protest school reopening plans


Stapleton residents vote “Central Park” as new name; “It really is a meaningful first step”

Rachel Ellis, The Denver Post

Praire Young, 4, center, takes part in a rally in support of Stapleton neighborhood’s name change in Central Park in Aurora on June 20, 2020.

After weeks of voting and decades of activism, a neighborhood named after a former Denver mayor and Ku Klux Klan member finally will be rebranded.

Central Park soon will become the new neighborhood name, an ode to the green space that runs through town, Amanda Allshouse, the president of the board of Stapleton United Neighbors, announced Saturday. Read more here…


COVID-19 cases hit new weekly high in Colorado, but virus’ trajectory unclear

STRIDE RN Stephanie Campell holds Colorado ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

STRIDE nurse Stephanie Campell holds Colorado Gov. Jared Polis’ COVID-19 test after he was tested following a press conference outside of STRIDE Community Health Center in Wheat Ridge on Monday, May 18, 2020.

Cases of COVID-19 in Colorado hit a new high last week, but it’s not yet clear if that partly reflects the fallout of an early July blip.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reported 3,799 cases of the new coronavirus in the week ending Sunday, marking the sixth week of increasing cases. The total likely will rise, though, because the state on Monday said newly reported cases “may be artificially low” due to a computer issue. Read more here…


Gov. Jared Polis: “I’m calling on Coloradans not to be stupid”

David Zalubowski, The Associated Press

Colorado Governor Jared Polis makes a point during a news conference on the state’s efforts against the new coronavirus Tuesday, July 21, 2020, in Denver.

Coloradans who attend large events, don’t wear masks and don’t follow social-distancing guidelines are not only putting themselves but others at risk, Gov. Jared Polis said Tuesday in response to concerns about a large event in Weld County over the weekend. Read more here…


Meteorologist Marty Coniglio leaves 9News after comparing federal troops to Nazis

Screenshot

Meteorologist Marty Coniglio, a staple of Denver TV weather for three decades, left 9News Friday, a day after he compared, on social media, federal troops in U.S. cities to Nazis. Read more here…


A few more important stories from the past week

+ Construction starts on Denver’s second tiny-home village, aided by company tied to bid-rigging scandal

+ Legal motions for and against new rules, the prospect of future initiatives: Are the oil and gas wars really over?

+ Science points to in-person learning as safe amid COVID-19 pandemic — but is it safe enough for Colorado’s school districts?

+ Man suspected of firing shots on I-225 during Aurora protest is arrested

+ “Frightening.” “Terrifying.” Coloradans brace for fiscal fallout as federal $600 weekly unemployment aid ends

+ CU community feared Mark Kennedy was unqualified to be president. How has he done leading during a pandemic?

+ Do Colorado hospitals get extra money for coronavirus cases and deaths? Yes and no.

+ Castle Rock restaurant that defied public health order in May closes permanently two months later

+ Westminster Public Schools moves to fire teacher over “appalling” comments about students with special needs


Photo of the week

See more great photos like this on The Denver Post’s Instagram account.

Colorado Rockies home opener against the ...
Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Colorado Rockies home opener against the San Diego Padres at Coors Field July 31, 2020.

+ PHOTOS: The Colorado Rockies 26th home opener at Coors Field


Scituate Barracks

On August 2, 2020 at 2:15AM, Troopers arrested Ryan Pena, age 31, of 15 Gesler Street, Providence Rhode Island, for 1. Driving Under the Influence 1st Offense B.A.C. Unknown and 2. Refusal to Submit to a Chemical Test. The arrest was the result of Troopers responding to a motor vehicle accident...


Isaias Moving Along Florida’s East Coast

Isaias has been a bit more disorganized in the past 24 hours. The low level circulation has been more exposed, and despite some strong convection offshore, Isaias has not been able to wrap that convection around the low level center.

Isaias moving near Florida’s East Coast

This has led to some weakening. Isaias is now a Tropical Storm with winds of 65 mph, and some gradual weakening is expected as it interacts with the coast. Still, this system will have impacts along most of the U.S. East Coast. You can track Isaias using our Interactive Radar

Isaias will hug the East Coast over the next several days, bringing heavy rains, gusty winds, dangerous rip currents, and coastal erosion.

Download Live Alert 19 for iOS or Android.

– Alex Puckett
Follow me on Twitter and Facebook


Detective Bureau

MEDIA CONTACT: 401-764-5606 Major John C. Alfred, Detective Commander

No arrests to report.


He promised his friend he’d split the cash if he won the lottery. He’s doing just that with his $22 million jackpot

(CNN) — Years ago, Thomas Cook and Joseph Feeney made a pact: if either of them ever won the lottery, they’d split the winnings. Then they shook on it.

Twenty eight years later, Cook kept his word.

The Elk Mound, Wisconsin, man won a whopping $22 million playing the Powerball.

And true to his word, he reached out to his old fishing buddy Feeney.

“Are you jerking my bobber?” an incredulous Feeney asked, according to a Wisconsin Lottery office release Thursday.

The two friends had been buying tickets every week and were stunned their luck finally came around.

After reality set in, Cook did what any hard-working American would do : he quit his job!

He’s now enjoying the retired life alongside Feeney, a retired firefighter.

The pair chose the cash option of $16.7 million, which means they each took home about $5.7 million after taxes.

So, what big plans are these two friends hatching now? The answer is simple: Spend more time together.

The longtime friends and their wives took a road trip some time ago, and they plan to do it again.

But this time, instead of a Chrysler PT Cruiser Convertible, they’ll be rolling out in something more stylish.


Coronavirus travel restrictions inspire cooperation in border communities

When the COVID-19 pandemic closed the Canada-U.S. border to non-essential travel, Donna Peter suddenly lost access to her nearest source of bulk groceries.


Man arrested after woman dies in Nottingham car park

The woman was given CPR by paramedics, but pronounced dead a short time later, police say.


Wickford Barracks

At 12:05 AM, Troopers arrested Zulma A. Esturban, age 41, of 3 May Street, North Providence, Rhode Island, for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicating Liquor and/ or Drugs – First Offense / B.A.C. .10% -.15%. The arrest was the result of reports of an erratic operator and subsequent motor...


Can’t download the COVID Alert app? Your operating system may be too old (or new)

The underlying framework the app is built on is only available on Apple and Android phones 'released with the past 5 years,' according to the Canadian Digital Service.


Two Haleyville residents arrested on methamphetamine trafficking charges

FRANKLIN COUNTY, Ala. – Two people were arrested after a traffic stop in Franklin County Friday.

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office said investigators assigned to the ALEA Division E Drug Enforcement Task Force stopped a car US-43 North.

During a search of the car, they said they found a pound of crystal methamphetamine that was being trafficked into Franklin County.

Phillip Camp, 60, and Nicole Ellenburg, 37, were arrested and charged with trafficking methamphetamine.

In addition, Ellenburg was charged with resisting arrest.

Both were taken to the Franklin County Jail and were being held without bond.

In addition to the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, multiple agencies were involved in the investigation, including the Colbert County Sheriff’s Office, Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office, and the 25th and 34th Judicial District Attorney’s Offices.


Mainland Chinese medical team is here to help Hong Kong fight Covid-19 – but it’s not so simple

In the business of journalism, a major event warrants breaking news, but what is omitted can be an even bigger story sometimes.On Friday evening, as I watched Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor live on television announcing the postponement of the Legislative Council elections in September, I was suddenly bombarded by news alerts about a mainland Chinese medical team being sent to Hong Kong.The alerts about the team coming from across the border to help with Covid-19 testing started to…


Authorities searching for missing south Alabama senior

FARIHOPE, Ala. – Fairhope Police are searching for a missing senior from south Alabama.

Robert Leon Whitley, 81, was last seen in the area of Lake Ridge Drive around 7:15 Saturday night.

Police said he may be traveling in a silver Toyota 4Runner with license plate number 8374AL5.

He is 5′ 11,” weighs 191 lbs., with gray hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a teal polo shirt and blue jeans.

Anyone with information on his whereabouts should call Fairhope Police at (251) 928-2385.


Forest of Dean roads closed as police shut down rave

A "large number" of people are being dispersed from the site in the Forest of Dean.


Hong Kong third wave: Financial Secretary Paul Chan warns government handouts won’t last, even as Covid-19 piles more pressure on economy

Hong Kong’s economy faces even greater pressure from the coronavirus crisis in the coming months but endlessly rolling out government support packages cannot be the long-term solution, the city’s financial chief has warned.Paul Chan Mo-po said on Sunday the “really worrying” surge in Covid-19 cases had taken its toll on the economy, which already slipped last year into its first recession for a decade and contracted sharply year-on-year over the first half of 2020.Predicting conditions were…


Vancouver police searching for missing woman with dementia

Vancouver Police are requesting the public’s help in locating a missing 77-year-old female who suffers from dementia. Teresa Gabriel was last seen at 4:00 p.m. Saturday afternoon in the area of East 45th Avenue and Tyne Street. Ms. Gabriel is an Asian female, 5’ tall with a medium build. She has shoulder length gray and...


Robbery

2901 Dryden Dr
Two McDonalds employees were held at knife point by a suspect who was demanding money from the safe. The suspect punched one employee several & #8230;


Weapons Violation

1000 block of S Thompson Dr
Madison police were called to a domestic disturbance where the suspect had fired a gun in the residence. The suspect pointed the gun at a family & #8230;


Stuart Broad ‘100%’ considered retirement after being dropped

Stuart Broad says he considered retirement after being left out by England for the first Test with West Indies.


Coronavirus weddings: ‘It’s heartbreaking to see my fiancee’s face’

Couples are frustrated that wedding receptions of up to 30 people are still not allowed in England.


From Singapore to India, urban farms sprout up as coronavirus leaves Bollywood celebrities with thyme on their hands

As the coronavirus ravages economies, forces countries into lockdowns and empties supermarket shelves, millions of people across Asia have been forced to put their former lifestyles on hold. But amid all the destruction, one pastime has just kept on growing: gardening.In the half a year since the virus first came to public attention, urban farming has boomed in popularity, as green-fingered Asians spot an opportunity to while away those lockdown hours while cutting living costs and putting food…


Traffic Safety Unit

At 2:00AM, Troopers of the Traffic Safety Unit arrested Stephen Arcand age 48 of 137 Scituate Avenue, Johnston RI for 1. Driving Under the Influence-1st Offense BAC Unknown and 2. Refusal to Submit to a Chemical Test. This arrest was the result of a motor vehicle stop on Route 6 in the Town of...


Hong Kong elections: set up polling stations for locals based in Greater Bay Area to cast votes, pro-establishment heavyweight urges

Hongkongers based across the border should be allowed to vote in the city’s future elections through polling stations set up in Guangdong, a pro-establishment heavyweight said on Sunday.Tam Yiu-chung, Hong Kong’s sole delegate to the National People’s Congress Standing Committee (NPCSC), made the comments after the city’s Legislative Council elections were postponed for a year amid the Covid-19 pandemic.“We have been calling on the public to move to [mainland cities] in the Greater Bay Area,”…


US-China relations: Mike Pompeo urges Hong Kong to reverse decision to suspend elections

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has urged Hong Kong to reverse a decision to suspend its legislative elections for a year amid a resurgence of the coronavirus, saying the delay would be another blow to its autonomy from Beijing.In a statement published on Sunday morning, Pompeo condemned the decision by Hong Kong’s embattled leader Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor to invoke her emergency powers to postpone the Legislative Council elections – scheduled for September 6 – until September 5, 2021.“We…


Hong Kong third wave: prioritise high-risk groups for Covid-19 tests instead of universal screening, health minister says

Hong Kong residents from high-risk groups such as the elderly should be given priority for Covid-19 tests, the city’s health minister said on Sunday as mainland authorities pledged free screenings for some 7.5 million people.Secretary for Food and Health Professor Sophia Chan Siu-chee was speaking a day after state broadcaster CCTV cited unidentified sources in saying that the central government would be offering free Covid-19 nucleic tests for Hongkongers. About 60 clinical technicians…


Final Update-Crash Blocks US95 North of Parma

IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE - generated by our News Release ListServer

DO NOT REPLY

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IDAHO STATE POLICE NEWS RELEASE

District 3 Patrol 700 S. Stratford Dr., Meridian, ID 83642 (208) 846-7550

Fax (208) 846-7520

For Immediate Release: 08/01/2020 11:52 P.M.

Please direct questions to the District Office

***Final Update***

All lanes are now open.

3933

***End of Final Update***

***Update 1***

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, at approximately 7:47 P.M., Idaho State Police investigated a two-vehicle, fatality crash, northbound on US95 near Ward Lane, north of Parma.

Dena Price, 64, of Parma, was driving southbound on US95 in a 2018 Chevy Colorado pickup. Juan Cardona-Velasco, 42, of Aguascalientes, Mexico was driving northbound on US95 in a 2005 Freightliner semi. Cardona-Velasco crossed the center line and collided head on with Price's vehicle.

Price was transported by air ambulance to St Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. She was wearing a seatbelt. Cardona-Velasco succumbed to his injuries on scene. He was not wearing a seatbelt. Next of kin has been notified.

Both northbound and southbound lanes are currently blocked while crews investigate.

3933/4183

***End of Update 1***

Idaho State Police are investigating a crash at US95 at Ward Lane, just north of Parma. Lanes are currently blocked.

4115

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