Births/Deaths Marriages

Hollander, Leonard (Lenny)

Leonard (Lenny) Hollander, passed away May 22, 2020. Born in Bronx, NY March 6, 1935 and family moved to Miami Beach in 1946. He Graduated Class of...


Alfred, Guard "Al" Warrington

Warrington, Alfred Coard "Al" , IV, 84, died May 20, 2020, at 7:15 am in Miami, Florida, of natural causes. He is survived by his wife of...


Krinsky, Alan

Alan Krinsky 1939 - 2020


Lazaro, Raquel

In loving memory of Raquel Lázaro whom the Lord called to His Kingdom on May 13, 2020.  Raquel lived a long and productive life.  She...


Richard, Wolfson "Dick"

Richard "Dick" Wolfson, 4/18/1928-5/28/2020 Richard "Dick" Wolfson,was born in Springfield, MA. Son of Maurice and Julia...


Events

Tired of coronavirus doom and gloom? You’re not alone.

It’s been more than six weeks since our physical worlds began closing in on us, from school and business closures that marooned many at home to travel restrictions that put most of our big, beautiful state out of reach.

Even as much of the Denver metro area remains under a stay-at-home order through Friday, there are increasing signs of fatigue. Each day under the uncomfortable new normal brings a stream of urgent coronavirus headlines and updates — as well as signs that people need an escape, from Denver parks and foothills trails crowded with sun-seekers to busy aisles at suburban home-improvement stores, which never closed down.

Lucy East understands the reasons for the continuing call for masks, social distancing and other precautions. She and her husband, Jonathan, both civil engineers, are working from home in Wheat Ridge. They’re being careful by ordering grocery deliveries and keeping their toddler out of day care to limit the family’s exposure.

But the longer it lasts, the lockdown takes a quiet emotional toll. The couple’s daughter, Alice, turned 1 on Thursday. Her grandparents are eager for family time.

“It’s getting a bit harder as time goes on not to see friends and family, especially for a birthday,” East said.

At times, frustrations have boiled over, as when a post on the Nextdoor site in northwest Denver declared last week: “It’s time to get back to living life.” The post quickly was met with competing torrents of applause and indignation. A day later, it had been taken down.

The rest of the state, along with Douglas County, began transitioning last week to Gov. Jared Polis’ “safer-at-home” order, which allowed many businesses to reopen with certain restrictions. The order keeps certain social distancing measures in place, and Polis still is urging people to wear masks when out in public — though adherence to this is spotty, at best.

But even as the governor called for continued vigilance and sacrifice, a public health expert who’s helped develop state COVID-19 projections says it’s natural that people are letting their guard down.

“More as a human being, I understand how people over time are feeling cooped up and experiencing this restlessness,” said Elizabeth Carlton, an assistant professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. “As someone who’s worked on the modeling team, I think the message that came through really clear when we were in our last set of simulations is that the next phase of this epidemic in Colorado will really be defined by how well we can maintain a certain amount of distance from each other, as hard as that is.”

Uncertainty in the new normal

How long variations on this new normal will last remains an unanswered question. It’s unclear how much longer it will be before we can go to the movies, attend sporting events or gather to hear live music. Or how long before younger children, after adapting to remote learning, can simply play with their friends again.

A look at the little data that’s available shows plenty of people have skirted the rules at times, whether it’s tossing a frisbee or a football in a park — despite Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s order against group sports activities — or venturing outside the house for trips deemed “unessential” by government orders.

Google has released periodic reports tracking movement through aggregate location data from people’s mobile phones. Through late March, its data for Colorado showed significant drops in travel to several types of destinations, compared to baseline levels prior to state and local restrictions taking effect.

But as April progressed, Google’s latest report shows, the extent that travel declined compared to baselines was considerably less, especially for trips to shop, eat and seek entertainment. When it comes to visiting parks and other outdoor places, Coloradans went from a 12% average decrease from normal in the March 29 report to 15% above the baseline in the April 26 report.

Some people are eager to move on.

When Echter’s Nursery and Garden Center in Arvada reopened its doors for in-person shopping on Thursday, after limiting sales to pickup orders for weeks, Gerald and Sandra Grant were among dozens of people in a line outside that snaked along the sidewalk and into the parking lot. The Grants said they relied heavily on President Donald Trump’s near-daily press conferences, calling them “encouraging.”

When asked how they were coping with the lockdown, Gerald laughed.

“What lockdown?” he said, before his wife said: “We’re off lockdown now.”

Another measure of fatigue came in a study released last week by the Pew Research Center. When it comes to following coronavirus news, Americans seem to be bordering on burnout.

Pew found 71% of more than 10,000 U.S. adults it surveyed in late April said they needed regular breaks from the news, compared to 28% who said they needed to stay constantly tuned in. More than 40% said COVID-related news made them feel worse emotionally.

Early on, Lucy East said she followed the news incessantly. Then a wellness challenge from her employer encouraged East and her coworkers to limit their news intake to 30 minutes per day. She says doing that has improved her mental health.

But Allea Ryan of Federal Heights still tunes in to broadcast news daily and receives breaking-news alerts on her phone. She likes keeping up, especially since her daughter is considered an essential worker at Walmart.

“I think if we stop hearing about it is when I’d become worried,” Ryan said.

Grappling with “what life might start to look like”

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski , right, play with their band The Good Kind as they perform in front of house belonging Lisa Cooper on May 3, 2020 in Gunbarrel. The group played in front of four different homes in the Boulder area to help alleviate the isolation caused by the coronavirus. The band kept their performances to groups of small friends that watched from their driveways most wearing masks and keep their distances from one another. The money the band raised from donations goes directly to There With Care that has been providing support for families during the critical phase of a medical crisis, easing their daily stresses with compassion and care.

Given the unprecedented nature of the pandemic response, psychologist Michelle Rozenman says any fatigue that develops often is rooted in prolonged stress, loneliness, guilt or exhaustion from new situations in people’s work or home lives.

“At this point, six weeks in, people have had an opportunity to see what life might start to look like,” said Rozenman, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Denver. “So whatever that means for them, however their routines have changed, if there’s a lack of consistency or structure, that may cause a problem.”

That upheaval has saddled children with anxiety and other challenges, too, she said, citing observations from her doctoral students’ remote therapy sessions with families in recent weeks.

Early last week, Polis acknowledged the pain brought by the stay-at-home orders. He took the tack of applauding the state’s residents for largely abiding by them. And he pleaded for patience, while announcing later in the week that his administration will put more emphasis on addressing the mental health effects of the crisis.

“There’s no easy answers here at all,” the governor said during his April 27 daily news conference. “We’re being challenged — we’re being asked to make sacrifices in our way. God willing, we should continue to be patient and treat each other with respect and love, knowing that better days (are ahead). … It’s a time not for anxiety, not for fear, but for justified caution.”

Rozenman said adults and children alike can enhance their mental calm in times like this by establishing routines, engaging in some kind of daily exercise, eating healthy food and getting consistent sleep as often as possible.

Carlton, the public health professor, urged common sense as restrictions are relaxed, adding that the onus would increasingly be on elected officials to “communicate what’s OK in addition to what’s not OK” to put people at ease.

As some models predict a second wave of coronavirus infections, she worries about limits in the public’s patience with social and physical restrictions.

“That has been a real big question that we’ve wrestled with,” Carlton said. “Nobody sees stay-at-home orders as sustainable for a very long period of time — or people will get restless.”

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


Tired of coronavirus doom and gloom? You’re not alone.

It’s been more than six weeks since our physical worlds began closing in on us, from school and business closures that marooned many at home to travel restrictions that put most of our big, beautiful state out of reach.

Even as much of the Denver metro area remains under a stay-at-home order through Friday, there are increasing signs of fatigue. Each day under the uncomfortable new normal brings a stream of urgent coronavirus headlines and updates — as well as signs that people need an escape, from Denver parks and foothills trails crowded with sun-seekers to busy aisles at suburban home-improvement stores, which never closed down.

Lucy East understands the reasons for the continuing call for masks, social distancing and other precautions. She and her husband, Jonathan, both civil engineers, are working from home in Wheat Ridge. They’re being careful by ordering grocery deliveries and keeping their toddler out of day care to limit the family’s exposure.

But the longer it lasts, the lockdown takes a quiet emotional toll. The couple’s daughter, Alice, turned 1 on Thursday. Her grandparents are eager for family time.

“It’s getting a bit harder as time goes on not to see friends and family, especially for a birthday,” East said.

At times, frustrations have boiled over, as when a post on the Nextdoor site in northwest Denver declared last week: “It’s time to get back to living life.” The post quickly was met with competing torrents of applause and indignation. A day later, it had been taken down.

The rest of the state, along with Douglas County, began transitioning last week to Gov. Jared Polis’ “safer-at-home” order, which allowed many businesses to reopen with certain restrictions. The order keeps certain social distancing measures in place, and Polis still is urging people to wear masks when out in public — though adherence to this is spotty, at best.

But even as the governor called for continued vigilance and sacrifice, a public health expert who’s helped develop state COVID-19 projections says it’s natural that people are letting their guard down.

“More as a human being, I understand how people over time are feeling cooped up and experiencing this restlessness,” said Elizabeth Carlton, an assistant professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. “As someone who’s worked on the modeling team, I think the message that came through really clear when we were in our last set of simulations is that the next phase of this epidemic in Colorado will really be defined by how well we can maintain a certain amount of distance from each other, as hard as that is.”

Uncertainty in the new normal

How long variations on this new normal will last remains an unanswered question. It’s unclear how much longer it will be before we can go to the movies, attend sporting events or gather to hear live music. Or how long before younger children, after adapting to remote learning, can simply play with their friends again.

A look at the little data that’s available shows plenty of people have skirted the rules at times, whether it’s tossing a frisbee or a football in a park — despite Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s order against group sports activities — or venturing outside the house for trips deemed “unessential” by government orders.

Google has released periodic reports tracking movement through aggregate location data from people’s mobile phones. Through late March, its data for Colorado showed significant drops in travel to several types of destinations, compared to baseline levels prior to state and local restrictions taking effect.

But as April progressed, Google’s latest report shows, the extent that travel declined compared to baselines was considerably less, especially for trips to shop, eat and seek entertainment. When it comes to visiting parks and other outdoor places, Coloradans went from a 12% average decrease from normal in the March 29 report to 15% above the baseline in the April 26 report.

Some people are eager to move on.

When Echter’s Nursery and Garden Center in Arvada reopened its doors for in-person shopping on Thursday, after limiting sales to pickup orders for weeks, Gerald and Sandra Grant were among dozens of people in a line outside that snaked along the sidewalk and into the parking lot. The Grants said they relied heavily on President Donald Trump’s near-daily press conferences, calling them “encouraging.”

When asked how they were coping with the lockdown, Gerald laughed.

“What lockdown?” he said, before his wife said: “We’re off lockdown now.”

Another measure of fatigue came in a study released last week by the Pew Research Center. When it comes to following coronavirus news, Americans seem to be bordering on burnout.

Pew found 71% of more than 10,000 U.S. adults it surveyed in late April said they needed regular breaks from the news, compared to 28% who said they needed to stay constantly tuned in. More than 40% said COVID-related news made them feel worse emotionally.

Early on, Lucy East said she followed the news incessantly. Then a wellness challenge from her employer encouraged East and her coworkers to limit their news intake to 30 minutes per day. She says doing that has improved her mental health.

But Allea Ryan of Federal Heights still tunes in to broadcast news daily and receives breaking-news alerts on her phone. She likes keeping up, especially since her daughter is considered an essential worker at Walmart.

“I think if we stop hearing about it is when I’d become worried,” Ryan said.

Grappling with “what life might start to look like”

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski , right, play with their band The Good Kind as they perform in front of house belonging Lisa Cooper on May 3, 2020 in Gunbarrel. The group played in front of four different homes in the Boulder area to help alleviate the isolation caused by the coronavirus. The band kept their performances to groups of small friends that watched from their driveways most wearing masks and keep their distances from one another. The money the band raised from donations goes directly to There With Care that has been providing support for families during the critical phase of a medical crisis, easing their daily stresses with compassion and care.

Given the unprecedented nature of the pandemic response, psychologist Michelle Rozenman says any fatigue that develops often is rooted in prolonged stress, loneliness, guilt or exhaustion from new situations in people’s work or home lives.

“At this point, six weeks in, people have had an opportunity to see what life might start to look like,” said Rozenman, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Denver. “So whatever that means for them, however their routines have changed, if there’s a lack of consistency or structure, that may cause a problem.”

That upheaval has saddled children with anxiety and other challenges, too, she said, citing observations from her doctoral students’ remote therapy sessions with families in recent weeks.

Early last week, Polis acknowledged the pain brought by the stay-at-home orders. He took the tack of applauding the state’s residents for largely abiding by them. And he pleaded for patience, while announcing later in the week that his administration will put more emphasis on addressing the mental health effects of the crisis.

“There’s no easy answers here at all,” the governor said during his April 27 daily news conference. “We’re being challenged — we’re being asked to make sacrifices in our way. God willing, we should continue to be patient and treat each other with respect and love, knowing that better days (are ahead). … It’s a time not for anxiety, not for fear, but for justified caution.”

Rozenman said adults and children alike can enhance their mental calm in times like this by establishing routines, engaging in some kind of daily exercise, eating healthy food and getting consistent sleep as often as possible.

Carlton, the public health professor, urged common sense as restrictions are relaxed, adding that the onus would increasingly be on elected officials to “communicate what’s OK in addition to what’s not OK” to put people at ease.

As some models predict a second wave of coronavirus infections, she worries about limits in the public’s patience with social and physical restrictions.

“That has been a real big question that we’ve wrestled with,” Carlton said. “Nobody sees stay-at-home orders as sustainable for a very long period of time — or people will get restless.”

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


Tired of coronavirus doom and gloom? You’re not alone.

It’s been more than six weeks since our physical worlds began closing in on us, from school and business closures that marooned many at home to travel restrictions that put most of our big, beautiful state out of reach.

Even as much of the Denver metro area remains under a stay-at-home order through Friday, there are increasing signs of fatigue. Each day under the uncomfortable new normal brings a stream of urgent coronavirus headlines and updates — as well as signs that people need an escape, from Denver parks and foothills trails crowded with sun-seekers to busy aisles at suburban home-improvement stores, which never closed down.

Lucy East understands the reasons for the continuing call for masks, social distancing and other precautions. She and her husband, Jonathan, both civil engineers, are working from home in Wheat Ridge. They’re being careful by ordering grocery deliveries and keeping their toddler out of day care to limit the family’s exposure.

But the longer it lasts, the lockdown takes a quiet emotional toll. The couple’s daughter, Alice, turned 1 on Thursday. Her grandparents are eager for family time.

“It’s getting a bit harder as time goes on not to see friends and family, especially for a birthday,” East said.

At times, frustrations have boiled over, as when a post on the Nextdoor site in northwest Denver declared last week: “It’s time to get back to living life.” The post quickly was met with competing torrents of applause and indignation. A day later, it had been taken down.

The rest of the state, along with Douglas County, began transitioning last week to Gov. Jared Polis’ “safer-at-home” order, which allowed many businesses to reopen with certain restrictions. The order keeps certain social distancing measures in place, and Polis still is urging people to wear masks when out in public — though adherence to this is spotty, at best.

But even as the governor called for continued vigilance and sacrifice, a public health expert who’s helped develop state COVID-19 projections says it’s natural that people are letting their guard down.

“More as a human being, I understand how people over time are feeling cooped up and experiencing this restlessness,” said Elizabeth Carlton, an assistant professor at the Colorado School of Public Health. “As someone who’s worked on the modeling team, I think the message that came through really clear when we were in our last set of simulations is that the next phase of this epidemic in Colorado will really be defined by how well we can maintain a certain amount of distance from each other, as hard as that is.”

Uncertainty in the new normal

How long variations on this new normal will last remains an unanswered question. It’s unclear how much longer it will be before we can go to the movies, attend sporting events or gather to hear live music. Or how long before younger children, after adapting to remote learning, can simply play with their friends again.

A look at the little data that’s available shows plenty of people have skirted the rules at times, whether it’s tossing a frisbee or a football in a park — despite Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s order against group sports activities — or venturing outside the house for trips deemed “unessential” by government orders.

Google has released periodic reports tracking movement through aggregate location data from people’s mobile phones. Through late March, its data for Colorado showed significant drops in travel to several types of destinations, compared to baseline levels prior to state and local restrictions taking effect.

But as April progressed, Google’s latest report shows, the extent that travel declined compared to baselines was considerably less, especially for trips to shop, eat and seek entertainment. When it comes to visiting parks and other outdoor places, Coloradans went from a 12% average decrease from normal in the March 29 report to 15% above the baseline in the April 26 report.

Some people are eager to move on.

When Echter’s Nursery and Garden Center in Arvada reopened its doors for in-person shopping on Thursday, after limiting sales to pickup orders for weeks, Gerald and Sandra Grant were among dozens of people in a line outside that snaked along the sidewalk and into the parking lot. The Grants said they relied heavily on President Donald Trump’s near-daily press conferences, calling them “encouraging.”

When asked how they were coping with the lockdown, Gerald laughed.

“What lockdown?” he said, before his wife said: “We’re off lockdown now.”

Another measure of fatigue came in a study released last week by the Pew Research Center. When it comes to following coronavirus news, Americans seem to be bordering on burnout.

Pew found 71% of more than 10,000 U.S. adults it surveyed in late April said they needed regular breaks from the news, compared to 28% who said they needed to stay constantly tuned in. More than 40% said COVID-related news made them feel worse emotionally.

Early on, Lucy East said she followed the news incessantly. Then a wellness challenge from her employer encouraged East and her coworkers to limit their news intake to 30 minutes per day. She says doing that has improved her mental health.

But Allea Ryan of Federal Heights still tunes in to broadcast news daily and receives breaking-news alerts on her phone. She likes keeping up, especially since her daughter is considered an essential worker at Walmart.

“I think if we stop hearing about it is when I’d become worried,” Ryan said.

Grappling with “what life might start to look like”

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski ...
Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

People dance as guitarist Russ Grabski , right, play with their band The Good Kind as they perform in front of house belonging Lisa Cooper on May 3, 2020 in Gunbarrel. The group played in front of four different homes in the Boulder area to help alleviate the isolation caused by the coronavirus. The band kept their performances to groups of small friends that watched from their driveways most wearing masks and keep their distances from one another. The money the band raised from donations goes directly to There With Care that has been providing support for families during the critical phase of a medical crisis, easing their daily stresses with compassion and care.

Given the unprecedented nature of the pandemic response, psychologist Michelle Rozenman says any fatigue that develops often is rooted in prolonged stress, loneliness, guilt or exhaustion from new situations in people’s work or home lives.

“At this point, six weeks in, people have had an opportunity to see what life might start to look like,” said Rozenman, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Denver. “So whatever that means for them, however their routines have changed, if there’s a lack of consistency or structure, that may cause a problem.”

That upheaval has saddled children with anxiety and other challenges, too, she said, citing observations from her doctoral students’ remote therapy sessions with families in recent weeks.

Early last week, Polis acknowledged the pain brought by the stay-at-home orders. He took the tack of applauding the state’s residents for largely abiding by them. And he pleaded for patience, while announcing later in the week that his administration will put more emphasis on addressing the mental health effects of the crisis.

“There’s no easy answers here at all,” the governor said during his April 27 daily news conference. “We’re being challenged — we’re being asked to make sacrifices in our way. God willing, we should continue to be patient and treat each other with respect and love, knowing that better days (are ahead). … It’s a time not for anxiety, not for fear, but for justified caution.”

Rozenman said adults and children alike can enhance their mental calm in times like this by establishing routines, engaging in some kind of daily exercise, eating healthy food and getting consistent sleep as often as possible.

Carlton, the public health professor, urged common sense as restrictions are relaxed, adding that the onus would increasingly be on elected officials to “communicate what’s OK in addition to what’s not OK” to put people at ease.

As some models predict a second wave of coronavirus infections, she worries about limits in the public’s patience with social and physical restrictions.

“That has been a real big question that we’ve wrestled with,” Carlton said. “Nobody sees stay-at-home orders as sustainable for a very long period of time — or people will get restless.”

Join our Facebook group for the latest updates on coronavirus in Colorado.


The Killers

The Killers
Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at 7:30 PM

American Airlines Arena

601 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33132 United States

Tedeschi Trucks Band

Tedeschi Trucks Band
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 at 7:00 PM

Broward Center for the Performing Arts - Au Rene Theater

201 SW 5th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 United States

School/Class News

 

 

 

 

Pictures

Sports

Colorado may start allowing guided groups for fishing, biking, climbing and other outdoor recreation

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is soliciting public input on a draft of proposed rules regarding outdoor recreation with new Safer at Home guidelines due to be finalized on Thursday.

The invitation to public comment came as Gov. Jared Polis issued an executive order on Monday relaxing restrictions on “high-risk” Coloradans — those 65 years old and older, along with those who have underlying health conditions — who were previously required to stay at home due to COVID-19. Monday’s executive order says they are now “encouraged” to enjoy the Colorado outdoors, with social distancing, while staying at home “as much as possible.”

The draft guidance for outdoor recreation would allow unguided outdoor recreation of any kind for groups of up to 10 people. It would allow guided groups for fishing, biking, horseback riding, canoeing, kayaking, climbing and other activities for groups of up to 10. River outfitters, rafting and Jeep tours could occur if parties in boats or Jeeps were limited to household members.

The draft also includes a long list of rules for operators and recreators to follow. The public has until noon on Wednesday to weigh in.

Regarding the relaxation of at-risk people recreating outdoors, Monday’s executive order says “vulnerable individuals” should “stay at home or in the vast, great outdoors away from others as much as possible” while continuing to limit social interactions, maintaining 6-foot distancing and wearing face coverings. Vulnerable individuals include those 65 or older along with individuals with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma, serious heart conditions, those who are immunocompromised, pregnant women and those “determined to be high risk by a licensed healthcare provider.”

“Our state has some of the most beautiful natural open spaces in the world and we want Coloradans to enjoy our vast, great outdoors,” Polis said in a news release. “Coloradans have to remain diligent, and must continue staying home or in the great outdoors away from others as much as possible, wearing masks when we leave the house, and washing our hands. Over these next few weeks, each and every one of us has a responsibility to protect ourselves and others, especially as we begin venturing out onto our trails and open space.”

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, The Adventurist, to get outdoors news sent straight to your inbox.


Former Stampeder Jon Cornish never experienced racism in Calgary ‘until last week’

Speaking candidly about racism, Cornish said, “it is here. It’s not like this is some issue that’s far away.”


After postponing, Bolder Boulder decides to officially cancel 2020 race

Citing ongoing concerns over COVID-19 and uncertainty over when it will be safe for runners to gather in large crowds, officials of the Bolder Boulder have scrapped plans to run the postponed race on Labor Day and canceled it for this year.

“It’s the most difficult decision we have ever had to make,” said race director Cliff Bosley. “At the core of the decision is the health and safety of our participants and the community. That’s paramount.”

On March 16, race officials announced a postponement of the annual Memorial Day race. Ten days later, they said they would try to run the race on Labor Day. But now they have decided that that is not feasible.

“In the eleven or twelve weeks that have passed, there are still a lot of unknowns that really have health and safety implications,” Bosley said. “The state is still under orders for no gatherings larger than 10 people. The closer we get to Labor Day, the more that landscape makes it difficult to consider staging the race.”

The Bolder Boulder, which dates back to 1979, typically attracts about 45,000 runners, ranking it as the fourth-largest running race in the United States. More than 14,000 runners were already signed up for this year’s race when Bosley suspended registration in March. Those runners are now automatically re-registered for next year’s race at no additional cost and will receive their race packets through the mail, including whatever shirt package they selected.

They also have the option of deferring their registration to 2022 or beyond.

About 14,500 people in the U.S. as well as in 21 other countries signed up to run the Bolder Boulder virtually last week, Bosley said, with nearly 600 of them running on the streets of Boulder on Memorial Day. Some residents with homes along the race course kept their Memorial Day rituals intact, making signs and keeping water hoses at the ready. Some ran as families, and many of the runners ran all the way up the steep climb to the entryway to Folsom Field — the traditional finish of the race — and posed for pictures at a locked gate there.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, The Adventurist, to get outdoors news sent straight to your inbox.


Yoga studios, boutique fitness not sure if they’ll be able to make it through coronavirus closures

Contemplating existential threats confronting the boutique fitness industry in the wake of COVID-19, Patrick Harrington finds a lesson in savasana, the “Corpse Pose” that typically brings yoga classes to a close.

“The reason that pose is practiced as often as it is — every single time — is because, philosophically, if you’re not willing to face your own death and let go of the parts that aren’t working in order for you to be reborn when you stand back up off the mat, life is really hard,” said Harrington, the founder of Kindness Yoga with nine locations in the Denver area. “I’m embracing every day dying a little death around the future of our business, because it’s unknown. Will boutique fitness make it? Will people come back?”

The degree to which members will come back when gyms reopen is a question vexing the entire fitness industry, but boutique studios face special challenges. By definition, they are smaller than big-name, big-box gyms, so conducting classes with social distancing severely limits the number of people they can serve in a given class. Often they are small privately owned businesses with high overhead costs, especially in Denver with its steep real estate prices.

RELATED: Denver gyms are preparing to reopen. Here’s how they plan to get you sweating safely.

Harrington said some yoga teachers have responded to the shutdown of studios by marketing their own online classes, creating a new source of competition in an industry that already had a lot of it.

“The average profit margin for a yoga studio is 7%,” Harrington said. “That’s a very thin margin, and it relied upon maximum occupancy. If you don’t have a business where you can have maximum occupancy, you don’t have a business. We are having to negotiate with all of our landlords and/or walk away, and/or declare bankruptcy because the opportunity to be four walls where people come together and spiritualize, practice yoga, work out, is no longer an advantage. It’s actually a disadvantage. All the risk the entrepreneurs took to become a boutique fitness location, there’s no upside to our risk anymore, at all. What used to be an upside potential for the risk has now shifted to be a complete downside.”

Danielle Barbeau, the sole owner of The River Yoga’s two Denver locations, says she is optimistic by nature and ”hopefully not naïve” regarding the future of boutique fitness. She is going forward with construction on a third studio but concedes it is an act of hope.

“I don’t think the boutique industry is dead by any means,” Barbeau said. “I do think it’s in a space of some transformation, and I don’t think everyone is going to survive this.”

Corina Lindley owns six Denver Endorphin studios and another in Eagle that offer yoga, barre, indoor cycling, high-intensity training and strength training. Having founded the business in 2007, she once had 11 studios but closed five in the past four years because of competition from national chains. She calls Endorphin, which she co-owns with her husband, a “creative passion project,” but even before COVID-19, there were times when she wondered if it was worth it.

“We’ve never had a year when it’s been so financially bad that we’ve decided to quit, but we’ve had plenty of years when we almost did,” Lindley said. “It’s the community that keeps us together, the faces and the emails that say, ‘Thank you for doing what you’re doing’ that keep us going.”

Lindley has been working 18-hour days since Colorado gyms closed in March, trying to hold her company together.

“I think that’s what it’s going to take,” Lindley said. “Hopefully that kind of work ethic is going to help take these boutique gyms into survival and success. We hope there’s enough people who still want that type of environment to work out. We feel strongly that we will survive. What that looks like going forward, we don’t know.”

Barbeau believes the fragmented boutique industry needed to “organize and professionalize” itself even before COVID-19.

“Now we are being challenged to organize and think ahead about what is going to make this industry sustainable for entrepreneurs and for individuals,” Barbeau said. “We as business owners are going to have to look at how do we increase our margins, how do we diversify our revenue streams, and how do we bring value in different ways to people who are willing to stick with us.”

Barbeau is investing in high-quality video technology for online classes, acknowledging that it’s a gamble while hoping members find it a lot more appealing than “Joe Schmo who is filming with his iPhone in his living room,” she said. The River is currently streaming five live classes daily, and on June 1 she will launch an on-demand membership site.

“That will be like Netflix for yoga classes, where you can get on at any time, you can pick which kind of class you want, and off you go,” Barbeau said. “We’re hoping a long-term investment in that will be another way to support our people, even once they can come back into the studio.”

There is still the dilemma that the appeal of boutique fitness is based in part on the social benefits of working out in groups, but COVID-19 isolates people who pursue fitness. Even after restrictions on gatherings are relaxed, some will be reluctant to return to group workouts.

Lindley can speak to the health side of the issue, having founded her studios following a career in public health where she worked in HIV, chronic disease and obesity prevention. She has a master’s degree in public health and epidemiology.

“We are human and social and connecting beings,” Lindley said. “This is a virus that is not going away. With the population of under 40, or even under 50, the mortality rate is very low. Yeah, it’s a little bit more than the flu, but we also have to live our lives and get on with things. The economic and mental and psychological effects of not going to the gym, I think, way out-weigh the risk of potentially getting COVID in these populations.”

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter, The Adventurist, to get outdoors news sent straight to your inbox.


Love of hockey kept Saskatchewan referee officiating for nearly 45 years

After nearly 45 years of officiating hockey, Bruce Skilliter officiated his last SJHL game in November 2019.


Weather

Weather Reports

The Single Guy Blog

My New Dream Girl

Well it has been a while since I posted. I guess after finding out my dream girl was having a baby by another guy I just wasn’t in the mood to post. But I’m back folks! So I have a new dream girl. It is a bit of a long story so sit back,pour a cup of coffee and relax. So I have been stalking the Facebook page of the bar I use to work at-ya know how a single guys does when he has no life. I saw some pictures of a beautiful girl that bartends there. Blond hair,beautiful smile…just perfect. Of course I figured I would never have a chance with her-specially since she is about 20 years younger. But a guy can dream right? So a couple days ago I was looking around seekingarrangements to see if anyone new had signed up and who do I see? Yep that girl! We will call her…Tanya…So I figured hey send her a message who knows what might happen. She sent me a message back and we sent a few more messages back and forth. I gave her my number and SURPRISE she sends me a text! So we have been talking for a couple days now. She even says she likes older guys and not the young military guys that come into the bar where she works. We are planning on meeting this week. So we will see what happens…I have my fingers crossed and won’t be surprised if she disappears before we actually meet….but I might just actually have found my future wife-or she may just “ghost” on me like so many flakey girls do. Stay tuned..maybe the Single Guy won’t be single much longer!


Whats Really
News Blog

Two men killed in separate Denver stabbings are identified

A man stabbed to death in Denver on South Broadway and another man fatally stabbed on South Quebec Street have been identified.

Paul Evans, 49, was stabbed Thursday night in the 1500 block of South Broadway and was pronounced dead at Denver Health Medical Center, according to the Office of the Medical Examiner.

Allen Menendez,47, is being held for investigation of first-degree murder for  Evans’ death. Police have said that the incident is not related to George Floyd protests in Denver.

The coroner’s office on Monday also announced the identity of a man who was stabbed in the 1800 block of South Quebec Street.

Joshua Spielman, 31, died May 22 at the University of Colorado Hospital, according to a news release. Spielman died of sharp force injuries and his manner of death is a homicide.

A police investigation is ongoing.


Miami Blog

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

Read Full Story